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two routers off existing cable,

May 27, 2009 at 12:43:19
Specs: Windows Vista and xp

I have existing cable into my house, with 3 computers running off one router from the incoming cable modem, which is both tv and internet. Now we want to add computer access to another room. All thats available in that room is the existing cable. Can I put a router on that cable line, then connect another computer in that room? Running a ethernet cable would be a real pain from existing router. Thanks

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#1
May 27, 2009 at 12:59:40

Yep you can. Might just need to connect it with a crossover cable and be sure you understand if you really want to use the switch part of the router or the actual routing features.

"Best Practices", Event viewer, host file, perfmon, antivirus, anti-spyware, Live CD's, backups, are in my top 10


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#2
May 27, 2009 at 13:10:55

No. If you only have coax cable (like that that plugs into TV) in the other room, you will have to buy another cable modem and also pay for additional service.

If you won't want to run an ethernet cable, you still have several options. You can get a wireless access point and a wireless adapter for the computer, or you can look into the various networking over power line adapters available (http://www.dlink.com/products/category.asp?cid=106&sec=1)

-Ryan Adams
Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com

Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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#3
May 27, 2009 at 18:18:45

Guess we have to re-investigate this whole thing.

"Best Practices", Event viewer, host file, perfmon, antivirus, anti-spyware, Live CD's, backups, are in my top 10


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#4
May 27, 2009 at 18:37:31

@jefro: From the original post, it sounds like he does NOT have an Ethernet cable in that room (and does not want to run one). He was asking if he could somehow attach a second router to the existing cable (meaning the coax TV cable). To do that, he would have to also get a second cable modem, and activate it with his service provider (for a monthly fee).

If I somehow misread that, and there is at least one working Ethernet cable in the room, then I don't understand why he would need anything at all. Just plug the computer into that cable. If he wants to connect more than one computer, a switch (but not a router) is in order.

-Ryan Adams
Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com

Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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#5
May 27, 2009 at 18:46:14

ok, after reading both reponses, and thanks for the help, I got to thinking. How about I put a switch in the closest room that has a computer, and run the e cable from the switch to the new location. Mapping it out would be like this: incoming cable- cable modem- router- 2 computers-e cable to switch-2 computers. Can I use a switch in this configuration or would a router be better. Guess I'm confused on the correct hardware for the application. I have both on hand, nothing I owm atm is wireless :(
Thanks again

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#6
May 27, 2009 at 19:22:49

You should have your coaxial cable (coming from the wall) connected to the cable modem. Then the cable modem connects with a Ethernet cable to the routers "WAN" port. Your router will then have (probably) 4 "LAN" ports. You can connect one of two things to these "LAN" ports: a) a computer b) a switch. If you connect a switch to the LAN port, you will then have several more LAN ports on the new switch which you can again connect one of two things to: a) a computer b) a switch. And so on...

You do not need to use a router (and I would advise against it as it may complicate things in your setup).

One last thing of importance, some older switches require a crossover cable between the switch and the router (or previous switch). Most modern switches will work with either a crossover cable or a standard cable.

-Ryan Adams
Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com

Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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#7
May 27, 2009 at 19:46:13

ok, that sounds good, my switch is a linksys 5 port workgroup switch ezxs55w. Will only be running 2 computers off it, one for my child, the other just a guest room, rarely at best. The cable company boosted my signal when I told them I was running 3 computers.

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#8
May 28, 2009 at 00:06:31

"The cable company boosted my signal when I told them I was running 3 computers"

As long as everything is working, i wouldn't worry about it, but that doesn't make sense. The only "device" that would have any effect on the cable signal is the cable modem. It doesn't matter if you have 1 or 1000 computers behind it.

-Ryan Adams
Free Computer Tips and more:http://RyanTAdams.com

Paid Tech Support: Black Diamond


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#9
May 28, 2009 at 08:14:25

interesting, probably in the interest of good customer service, they told us that. Since it can't be measured except by their tech, they did come out and do some work in the cable feed box at the street, then replaced our modem. Said we had a weak signal. Now everything is good, no more drops at 3pm every afternoon. How does joe customer know when someone is blowing smoke, so to speak.Thanks for the responses all.

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#10
May 28, 2009 at 08:25:41

You probably had a weak signal because of a loose connection or fitting on the end of the coax.

As was already stated by RT, you don't send your internet via the coax cable. Also, you can't piggyback routers. You can use many switches/hubs. I believe the limitation in this case would be 255 ports.

You either need to use wireless, or run CAT5/6 cable to each computer.

Most wireless routers have wired ports too. So replacing the existing router with the appropriate wireless model may solve your problem. You would also need a compatible wireless LAN card for the remote computer.


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