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Solved Transferring Files from Win95 Hell

December 4, 2012 at 10:42:37
Specs: Windows 95

I have an old Dell running Windows 95, which we are attempting to phase out. However, we need about 2GB of data transferred from the machine to the new Win7 machine.

-It is my understanding that USB devices such as flash drives will not work win the version of Win95 I have.

-This machine is not recognizing any networks and will not connect to the internet.

-About 40% of the keys on the keyboard are non-functional, and we do not have a spare.

-It is my understanding that transferring data via parallel to USB would be potentially dangerous to the files.

-This machine cannot be down/off for more than 5-10 minutes at a time, thus ruling out removing the hard drive.

Does anyone have an ideas as to how I can get the data onto a newer machine despite all the problems I am running into? I was thinking maybe a crossover cable but am unsure of how that would work, and whether or not I would need software to do so... and since it is having issues with networking anyway, I'm wondering if it may not work at all.

Thanks!

Jessie


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✔ Best Answer
December 4, 2012 at 14:16:13

If I were faced with this situation I would put a second hard drive in the Windows 95 machine, copy the files to it and then transfer that drive to the Windows 7 machine. You only need to take the machine down for a few minutes to put the drive in and then again to take it out.

This does depend upon your being able to put your hands on a hard drive of at least 2GB (which wouldn't be a problem - I have half a dozen or more hard drives lying around) and both computers having the same interface - it must be IDE on something that old. So it relies on the Windows 7 machine having an IDE interface (or you could probably get a cheap interface card).

Transferring that much data via parallel or serial port is going to take an age. I remember using LapLink for that sort of thing many years ago, but not with such a relatively large amount of data.



#1
December 4, 2012 at 11:46:00

How big are the files? You might be able to get your hands on an old parallel port Zip drive and transfer them that way.

There is also hardware with corresponding software made for data transfer between two computers with parallel ports. Do a Google search for parallel port data transfer and you will get a few hits for these devices.


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#2
December 4, 2012 at 12:20:59

"It is my understanding that transferring data via parallel to USB would be potentially dangerous to the files."

If you COPY, not cut, you shouldn't have any problems if you can establish a connection.

Are these files 16 bit?

Is the Windows 7 computer running the 64 bit version?


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#3
December 4, 2012 at 12:47:52

It is Windows 7 64 bit.. Not really sure about the files themselves.

I'm going to go ahead and try the USB/Parallel connection, with your advice in mind. Thanks!


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Related Solutions

#4
December 4, 2012 at 12:48:55

I'd been looking into zip drives but this is something I am trying to get done quickly and cheaply. It looks like parallel is the way to go though.

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#5
December 4, 2012 at 14:16:13
✔ Best Answer

If I were faced with this situation I would put a second hard drive in the Windows 95 machine, copy the files to it and then transfer that drive to the Windows 7 machine. You only need to take the machine down for a few minutes to put the drive in and then again to take it out.

This does depend upon your being able to put your hands on a hard drive of at least 2GB (which wouldn't be a problem - I have half a dozen or more hard drives lying around) and both computers having the same interface - it must be IDE on something that old. So it relies on the Windows 7 machine having an IDE interface (or you could probably get a cheap interface card).

Transferring that much data via parallel or serial port is going to take an age. I remember using LapLink for that sort of thing many years ago, but not with such a relatively large amount of data.


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#6
December 4, 2012 at 15:20:08

ijack has a good idea. Besides those parallel to USB cables are sometimes dodgy.

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#7
December 4, 2012 at 15:35:32

Yep, go with ijack's suggestion.

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