toshiba satellite

January 22, 2009 at 11:39:22
Specs: Windows XP, 1.9ghz/512 sdram
hi everyone

one of my previous topics involved a laptop hard disk which was locked by ways of a password. i now have the laptop it came from, and i'm trying to fix it.

here's the thing. the '9' seems to be stuck on the keyboard. but aside from that, when i tried booting it, the system asked for a password, which means the password is set from the bios, and it's a boot pass. i took the thing apart. all of it. i'm looking for the battery or a cmos clear jumper. don't see them.

the system is a toshiba satellite pro a120 model no psac1e-05v021en

any help is appreciated, including mounting all these components back if i get stuck :) but i'll want to test it out first out in the open, boot the board see what's up. can i use a usb keyboard, and leave the laptops keyboard removed for testing ?

and can I do the tests without the display, just plugging in my own monitor into the board's vga out ?
I always say it's best to doublecheck.


See More: toshiba satellite

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#1
January 22, 2009 at 12:48:05
i found the manual.
http://uk.computers.toshiba-europe....

does not say where i can remove the cmos battery opr clear cmos.

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#2
January 22, 2009 at 13:36:22
where is this damn RTC battery i dont see it onboard

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#3
January 22, 2009 at 13:57:55
nevermind i found it :)

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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Related Solutions

#4
January 23, 2009 at 01:42:32
ok removing rtc battery did not remove the bios / startup passsword. i've been reading up forums, this one and others, and found that these laptops may have a jumper to be shorted on the mainboard. it's a satellite pro a120, on the mobo it says FHBIS2 A5A001860 which i gather may also be known as Tecra A8. I've seen posts where the above mentioned jumper is under the ram, well not on this machine. i have the mainboard removed, and would appreciate a helping hand clearing the bios. thank you

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#5
January 23, 2009 at 06:58:29

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#6
January 23, 2009 at 07:33:11
without a floppy ? i just downloaded that, and extracted it in my pc and it says 'toshiba common modules not installed'. what now?

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#7
January 23, 2009 at 07:48:04
Common Module Download for WinXP

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#8
January 23, 2009 at 07:52:59
wow dude what is that:) i mean i see that it's the common module thing. but i'm on my pc. am i to install that madoule on my pc so i can make a bios flashing cd somehow? the laptop has no floppy. thanks a lot jam for helping me out. i've heard a bvios flash will get the problem fixed. let me know what do to next please.

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#9
January 23, 2009 at 07:59:21
NO!! You have to install both on the Toshiba!! You can't run the BIOS update on a different machine. No wonder you got the error...lol

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#10
January 23, 2009 at 08:03:57
well dude. how can i do that since i can't access the laptop? here's the issue: i power it on, first thing it does is ask for a password. nothing i can do. esc, F1, f12, nothing helps. i've been going thru toshiba forums and there are ways to reset the bios on the satellite pro. shorting out a jumper behind the ram, or using a parallel port dongle. this laptop has no parallel port so thats out of the question. i didn't find the pin shorting instructions for this particular model, the A120, probably because it was marketed in the uk. and those forums are by usa people. so i figured maybe you or jenny or someone with some experience in satellites pros can tell me the trick. i've been looking all over the board, to no avail. a manual bios reset is definitely in order.

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#11
January 23, 2009 at 09:44:28
OK, I just did a quick read thru the manual. You saw this, right?

"If you forget your HDD User Password, TOSHIBA will NOT be able to assist you, and your HDD will be rendered COMPLETELY and PERMANENTLY INOPERABLE. TOSHIBA will NOT be held responsible for any loss of any data, any loss of use or access to your HDD, or for any other losses to you or any other person or organization that result from the loss of access to your HDD. If you cannot accept this risk, don't register the HDD User Password."

"Changes to the settings within the BIOS setup program will not be erased even if the power supply is switched off and the main battery removed. However, if the built-in Real Time Clock (RTC) battery runs out of power, most of the settings will revert back to their default values. However, please note that the following items will not be affected in this instance:
* Password
* Hard Disk Drive Password
* Security controller"


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#12
January 23, 2009 at 09:59:00
right, i read all of that, and that's why i went looking on toshiba forums :) there's a trick. there's a point on the mobo that has to be grounded. and the bios will clear.

however, the owner of the laptop will come over here tomorrow to try out passwords he may have possibly set a year ago. jam, what happened is like this : the 9 key got stuck to ON, and obviously he could no longer type in his password anymore at boot. hence, he threw this laptop in a shelf and bought an Asus he still has and which I cleaned up for him yesterday and replaced thermal paste because it was restarting itself due to overheats. back to the issue at hand... i went and practically broke the aluminium contact under the 9 key, thus fixed that problem. now he can try and remember his password tomorrow and be able to type it in. if he does remember it, it'll unlock the hd aswell. btw, the tests i've run were done with the hd removed. so the problem is a bios AND hd pass, but i was hoping to resolve the bios password problem. i hear toshiba charges like 150usd to reset these, it's way too expensive.

i'm not charging the dude at all, he is a tenant of mine rents out one of my studios. if in the meantime you find that trick somewhere.. i'll be forever indebted. but hopefully he can remember his damn pass that way the hd is ok too. cheers

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#13
January 23, 2009 at 10:19:17
What about KILLCMOS?

http://www.majorgeeks.com/download2...


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#14
January 23, 2009 at 10:25:42
"Note that the operating system system requirement for this program is DOS. This means you need to be able to boot from a floppy or CD to DOS and execute the program. "

i cant get into anything.. do you think i can make the laptop boot to the cd-rom if the flash or killcmos was on it? I tried with a bootable xp cd, couldn't get past the password part.

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#15
January 23, 2009 at 11:59:34
Hi.
Go this from a Toshiba A200 Service Manual maybe it will help.
"If the user has forgotten the system password, use a jump wire to make a
short circuit on M/B C88 , then turn the computer power on. When booted, the
computer overrides password protection and automatically erases the current
password."

C88 means Capacitor number 88, so find it and short its pins with a wire.

Good luck.

Once upon a time the floppy disk was king.


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#16
January 23, 2009 at 15:24:26
ok i'm gonna try finding it now. thank you.

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#17
January 23, 2009 at 16:02:25
no good, the a120 doesn't have that cap. thanks anyway though

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#18
January 23, 2009 at 18:30:44
Did you find the place for the C88 and the capacitor wasnt there?

It has to have a C88 even if the capacitors is not there you could try to short the solders for the C88.

For eg if you find a bigger number such as C90 that means that all numbers before are there.

At least you now know that you need to short a capacitor to remove the password, maybe its another cap number for your model.

Good luck.

Once upon a time the floppy disk was king.


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#19
January 23, 2009 at 18:33:27
Another thing.

Got the service manual for the Satellite A100/A105 they also say to short the C88 Capacitor.

Have a better closer look at the board from both sides.

Good luck

Once upon a time the floppy disk was king.


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#20
January 23, 2009 at 19:22:46
Also found this, althou doubt it will work.

"Most Toshiba laptops and some desktop systems will bypass the BIOS password if the left shift key is held down during boot"

Good luck

Once upon a time the floppy disk was king.


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#21
January 23, 2009 at 23:31:48
hey as a matter of fact i did find capacitor numbers above 88, and close to it which made me wonder. let me ask you this, is there a link i can look up to see what different types of laptop caps look like ? because honestly, i only see three caps on the board which i KNOW are caps. and i know there are more, i just dont know all the different formats. left shift has been tried. i just took about 20 close-up snaps of the board and i'm gonna find a place to post them to show you.

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#22
January 24, 2009 at 00:41:52
Good news is, there may be an answer at this link.

http://www.pwcrack.com/security_chi...

Bad news is ther may not be any solution. Depends on EXACT Model number

There is nothing to learn from someone who already agrees with you.


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#23
January 24, 2009 at 07:22:37
There are many types of capacitors with diferent design, most cap's on notebook mobos are SMD caps little square/rectangulare components.

They can be black, yellow, brown, most of them will have no values writen on them for they are too small.

Here's an example but there are many more.

http://www.geocities.com/vk3em/smtg...

I would get a nice big magnifying glass with a good light and would do a close search for the C88.
Sometimes I just place the circuit on the window during daylight for a better view.

Good luck.

Once upon a time the floppy disk was king.


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#24
January 24, 2009 at 07:57:57
I was taking a look at a Tecra A8 board that i'm repairing, I found many, many capacitors that aren't numbered due to space on PCB. These numbers are on Toshiba's Board Schematics, in order to have access to one schematic you have to work on Toshiba, know someone that does or be God.

I did find the C1088 and the C2088 capacitors on this mobo, this means C1088 for e.g.
C-Capacitor
1 - First series of capacitors
088 - Capacitor number.
Same goes for C2088 with 2 being the capacitor series.
Also found C3088 and C4088.

The series represent the capacitor circuit area, 1 could mean PSU area and 2 Chipset Area and so on.

Also so noticed that the capacitors arround the CPU are numbered C90xx meaning that the ninth series are for the CPU.

For you case of system password I would try to found an Cxx88 near the CMOS area, find the CMOS/BIOS IC and look arround it, and maybe arround the internal BIOS battery connector.

Good luck.

Once upon a time the floppy disk was king.


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#25
January 24, 2009 at 08:23:03
dark, would i have to short out the cap with the rtc battery connected ? and the laptop's battery taken out ?

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#26
January 24, 2009 at 08:25:31
a lot of them start with 88. like c8855. i took some pics, should i upload them somewhere and post link ?

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#27
January 24, 2009 at 16:04:26
Well thats a good question.

From what I understand from the service manual for A100 series you short the cap without battery and without AC but with the RTC battery.

In the manual it mentions removing AC and battery but doesn't mention the RTC battery I assume you don't remove the CMOS battery.

As for the capacitor you should look for caps that end with 88 e.g. C1088 or C2088 or even C0088. From the manual I would bet that the capacitor to short is either C0088 or C1088, but thats just a guess.

Of course theres always the risk of damaging the board althou its very unlikely because you are working without direct power such as AC transformer and Battery.

Althou i've seen damaged boards from direct malfunction from the CMOS battery.

Basicaly when you short the pins from a capacitor your doing a bypass to the capacitor there shouldn't be any damaged from doing that.

If it was my notebook and I couldn't find the C88 capacitor I would short every capacitor with the 88 number on it one by one, of course this is a last resource.

If you could post really big and upclose photos from the entire board I could try to take a look, althou it will be hard from a photo.

Good luck

Once upon a time the floppy disk was king.


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#28
January 25, 2009 at 09:16:12
i will load the photos and post links maybe you can help. i found two solder blobs, near what CAN be the bios chip, it says Reset near them. i sshorted them out for 15 seconds with and without rtc plugged in, no change at all though.

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#29
January 25, 2009 at 10:54:08
Those solder joints that say reset are the place where you solder the CMOS reset button.

Some notebooks have a small hole on the bottom part that you push it with a pencil or pen in order to clear CMOS.

But that gave me an ideia for the Tecra i'm repairing, could you also post an upclose photo of those solder joints that say reset?
Also an upclose photo of the CMOS area.

Good luck.

Once upon a time the floppy disk was king.


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#30
January 25, 2009 at 11:00:00
okay, will do right away. keep in mind though, I'm not CERTAIN that chip is the bios, I'm assuming.

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#31
January 25, 2009 at 11:16:38
http://www.turboimagehost.com/p/123...

that's the one you asked for.


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#32
January 25, 2009 at 11:19:44

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#33
January 25, 2009 at 11:20:52
and those ^^^ are all the photos i took of the board, i don't think i missed any spot on it

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#34
January 25, 2009 at 13:21:45
No thats not the BIOS chip, you see next to it it says T4100 T stands for transformer.

Also the TLA-6T215LF is a Pulse Transformer not an EEPROM.

And like I said before those reset pins are the place for the reset button. If you short them you will clear the CMOS, but the password will stay.

Once upon a time the floppy disk was king.


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#35
January 25, 2009 at 13:31:02
There is however another way!

Note that this is the ultimate solution.
Find the BIOS IC (chip). Desolder it!
Replace it with a socket!

Open the Toshiba bios updater (don't know how) and extract the binary ROM file.

Buy a new empty EEPROM the same as the one that was desoldered only for socket instead of solder and flash it with an EEPROM burner and the extracted binary.

Put the new chip on the socket, it should boot password free.

Needed tools for this:

Precision soldering station or Hot air station.
Also need the know how, maybe you know someone in electronics?

This is the ultimate way! Of course i'm pretty sure there's another way just don't have anymore ideas right now! Maybe later! he he

Good luck

Once upon a time the floppy disk was king.


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#36
January 25, 2009 at 14:47:37
well, i guess i gave it all I had. owner coming over soon to try out passwords he may have used. hope that works, otherwise it's trashed. thank you all so much for trying.

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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