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Solved Switch windows 7 from SSD to conventional hard drive

December 29, 2012 at 07:08:37
Specs: Windows 7 64 bit, Core i7 Dual Core

How do I optimize windows 7 to switch from an SSD back to a conventional hard drive? I remember when I got an SSD there were all kinds of settings that had to be changed for optimal performance. Now I've switched back to a regular hard drive and performance is WAY slower than it should be. Thanks.

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✔ Best Answer
December 29, 2012 at 09:10:05

There's, like, a dozen SSD optimization guides out there. Most of them boil down to:
1) Make sure delete notify is enabled
2) Make sure defrag is disabled
3) Disable prefetching
4) Disable indexing

#1 is irreverent to traditional HDDs and can be ignored. #2 will probably happen automatically once Windows notices it's running a traditional drive. #3 should probably be enabled. #4 is up to you; if you use Windows search a lot, you should probably enable it.

Because I'm too lazy to do any real research, I pulled up a chart showing max SSD I/O operations a second and another chart showing traditional drive I/O ops a second. The high-end SSD beat the fastest spinning platter drive by a factor of 270, and the platters were spinning at 10,000 RPM, or potentially twice the rotational speed of your drive.

Is this a good comparison? Probably not; you're comparing the strength of the former to the weakness of the latter, but having your I/O take 10x longer isn't entirely unexpected. This is why SSDs cost. Prefetching and defragging attempt to turn random reads to sequential reads, so do make sure they're enabled.

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#1
December 29, 2012 at 07:28:56

Of course your system is going to be much slower. Why would you switch back from a fast SSD to a much slower mechanical HDD?

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#2
December 29, 2012 at 07:48:14

Because I am getting rid of it and I wanted to keep my SSD for other uses! I remember there were a whole bunch of settings that needed to be optimized to take full advantage of the SSD. DOn't those need to be switched back? The slowness I'm experiencing is way more than normal and way more than expected.

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#3
December 29, 2012 at 08:06:06

"I wanted to keep my SSD for other uses!"

I'm curious what these other uses might be? A SSD should be used to run the OS & a few of the most important programs. It should not be used for ALL programs or for storage, that's what the standard HDD is for. If you're used to the SSD performance, there's going to be a significant dropoff going back to a HDD.

I don't know what setting's you're asking about, BIOS? Can't help you with that without knowing the make/model of your board. In fact, you should post all your specs - CPU, RAM, graphics, make/model of your drives, etc.


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Related Solutions

#4
December 29, 2012 at 09:10:05
✔ Best Answer

There's, like, a dozen SSD optimization guides out there. Most of them boil down to:
1) Make sure delete notify is enabled
2) Make sure defrag is disabled
3) Disable prefetching
4) Disable indexing

#1 is irreverent to traditional HDDs and can be ignored. #2 will probably happen automatically once Windows notices it's running a traditional drive. #3 should probably be enabled. #4 is up to you; if you use Windows search a lot, you should probably enable it.

Because I'm too lazy to do any real research, I pulled up a chart showing max SSD I/O operations a second and another chart showing traditional drive I/O ops a second. The high-end SSD beat the fastest spinning platter drive by a factor of 270, and the platters were spinning at 10,000 RPM, or potentially twice the rotational speed of your drive.

Is this a good comparison? Probably not; you're comparing the strength of the former to the weakness of the latter, but having your I/O take 10x longer isn't entirely unexpected. This is why SSDs cost. Prefetching and defragging attempt to turn random reads to sequential reads, so do make sure they're enabled.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#5
December 29, 2012 at 21:36:22

That sounds like what I was looking for. Thanks.

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