Solved Startup problem on other homemade PC built by friend

September 21, 2016 at 10:14:45
Specs: Windows 7 home, Intel Pent., cpu g630, 4.00 GB, 64 bit
It is a homebuilt by a friend and is about 5 yrs old. It has Win 7 Ultra.

When I push the start button, it lights up momentarily then nothing. If I push and hold it in, sometimes it starts up and runs well.

Was wondering if it could be the power supply or just the button itself.

I don't use it much at all, but run virus checks about once a month, but I want it as a spare.


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✔ Best Answer
September 21, 2016 at 15:07:38
Hi again WarrenTSI.

I would disconnect the power supply from the MB, reconnect & test.
Repeat the process for the on/off switch on the MB.
Remove your memory 1 stick at a time & power on.
Final test being with no memory in & powering on.

Repeat the process if needed, on all drives, 1 by 1 disconnected from the MB.

message edited by Johnw



#1
September 21, 2016 at 10:48:08
If you can post the make/model & wattage of the power supply, one of will let you know if it's a decent one or a cheapie.

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#2
September 21, 2016 at 11:29:54
Are you comfortable with going inside the case? And do you have a multi-meter/test meter; even a very basic one. Even an analogue as opposed to a digital? I prefer analogue meters for many situations; not the least continuity tests... The needle moving is very clear indicator rather than wondering if flashing digits are really telling the truth...

If so, locate the on/off switch and see if per chance it has removable connectors between it and the motherboard. (With power removed of course) disconnect the switch from the motherboard. Fix/clip test leads across the switch terminals - the meter will be in the highest (for safety) ohms setting for this test. Operate the switch and see if it is either a permanent/proper/stable connection (i.e. latched on/closed) when in the "on" mode, or if it's actually intermittent or even mostly doesn't close at all.

On/off switches can and do fail; especially cheap versions; and it may simply be the switch is faulty - which is a little what it sounds like - pending the above test?


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#3
September 21, 2016 at 11:39:34
Yes, I am going to open it up and do some clean-up and will check it out. Don't have a meter anymore tho.

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Related Solutions

#4
September 21, 2016 at 12:14:01
mmm... A small neon mains tester might help... Identify which side of the switch is mains in and which out. Ensure mains is on into the system; and ensure the "in" side of the switch does light the neon. Then operate the on/off switch. If it doesn't light the neon on the "out" side of the switch then quite possibly it "is" the switch.

A small test meter can be bought from Radio Shack (presuming you're in Canada/USA) for about $10 or so...? Or see if you can borrow one. Ensure that when you do test continuity - using the ohms settings, the mains in is totally disconnected; otherwise you will blow/burn out the meter.


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#5
September 21, 2016 at 12:14:57
The power supply is an Antec True Power 2.0, Model TPII - 550.

I got sides off and blew out little bit of dust, but can't get to button. Don't know how to take off the front of unit. Got some black plastic screws, never seen that type before, look like maybe an Allen wrench type.


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#6
September 21, 2016 at 12:19:15
They maybe are just pressure type because they are the same material as the front piece? Don't want to try and pop them out .

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#7
September 21, 2016 at 13:08:57
Your power switch's life is almost over. It is worn out and now it is sporadically working. Get a nice flathead screwdriver and work at the panel and remove it. A tab might break. Its not the end of the world. Find the switch and follow the wires to the motherboard. Unplug the old switch from the motherboard. Buy a new one like this (https://www.amazon.com/Switch-Power-Style-Push-Button/dp/B000NWFEZQ) or a different style of your choice and plug it into the motherboard and then mount the switch.

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#8
September 21, 2016 at 14:57:44
The test for linuxman's statement would be to find the pair of pins on the motherboard that connect to the power switch. Touch both of them with something conductive. I like to use a screwdriver since I probably had to find one to take off the PC cover. This is the same as pushing the button. If everything behaves as normal, linuxman is correct and the switch is faulty. If not, there's something else going on.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#9
September 21, 2016 at 15:07:38
✔ Best Answer
Hi again WarrenTSI.

I would disconnect the power supply from the MB, reconnect & test.
Repeat the process for the on/off switch on the MB.
Remove your memory 1 stick at a time & power on.
Final test being with no memory in & powering on.

Repeat the process if needed, on all drives, 1 by 1 disconnected from the MB.

message edited by Johnw


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#10
September 21, 2016 at 16:51:20
linuxman

A quick tip regarding your #7 posting. If you put a link in full as you have done but "without the brackets" it will be automatically active so folk can just click on it and go there.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#11
September 23, 2016 at 10:20:00
Well, it was the power supply. Thot for sure was the button because when I did get it started, it would run good.

However, now it runs like a new computer. For couple of years, ran real slow, like clicking on an icon on the desktop, would take more than a few clicks to get it to open. Was like that on all the icons.

I guess the power supply was slowly burning out?

Anyway, thanks to all of you for the assistance. This site is the best and so are you guys/gals.

And especially to Johnw, good to talk to you again. I have copied most of your posts to a folder on my desktop, and run most of those apps you advise to keep my computers clean and running well.

Thanks again.


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#12
September 23, 2016 at 16:30:37
"However, now it runs like a new computer"
Nice work.

"And especially to Johnw"
Thanks WarrenTSI .


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#13
September 24, 2016 at 02:17:29
Good to see a positive outcome. Well done each.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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