Slow cpu after power outage

September 5, 2013 at 22:28:08
Specs: Windows Vista, Intel Core 2 DUO E8400/8GB
After power outages cpu is very slow. So here is what happened before the power outage:

Bought new graphics card, installed it worked great. Than I realized that it needed more vats than my psu (at that time) had so I bought new PSU installed it, works great. Than I realized that my cpu fan wasn't completely attached to the cpu so I went and bought new one. Left it on for a few hours was working fantastic but after several power outages within 4 hours with it turning on for a few seconds and than instantly off my cpu became slow. Any ideas? Never had it happening before but this is the first time I'm seeing this weird reaction. Now I can tell you this, cpu temperatures are fine and there is enough off cooling in the case itself.
Any thoughts or ideas are much appreciated..


See More: Slow cpu after power outage

Report •


#1
September 5, 2013 at 23:51:56
Improper shutdowns (eg power outages) can affect Windows itself, especially several power cuts within an hour. Try running Windows Error Checker on the C: drive.

right-click C: drive icon and choose properties.
Click the "tools" tab.
Click "Check Now".
Tick both tick-boxes.
Click "Start"
Restart Windows.

If that doesn't improve performance, consider re-installing Windows (Factory Recovery).


Report •

#2
September 6, 2013 at 06:43:06
I'll try that, anything that can be caused by any other hardware by any chance?
I'm very tempted to run memtest and HDD tests.

Report •

#3
September 6, 2013 at 07:36:02
I'm a little confused. Your CPU is an "Intel Core 2 DUO E8400" & you use the term "CPU" correctly several times within your post. But your main question/complaint is that the "cpu is very slow". So are you saying that instead of your E8400 running at 3.0GHz as it should, it's now running at a much lower clock speed? Or did you do a change-up on the term & are referring to your entire computer as a CPU? A little more info about your system, the graphics card & PSU would be helpful. If your system had been working OK after the graphics upgrade, why did you feel the PSU needed to be replaced? Which PSU did you have & what did you replace it with?

"I realized that my cpu fan wasn't completely attached to the cpu so I went and bought new one"

The CPU fan attaches to the heatsink, the heatsink "attaches" to the CPU. If it was loose, why didn't you just reattach it rather than buying a replacement? You said the CPU temps are fine but didn't post the temp(s). I'm guessing 30C-ish at idle? If the temp is significantly higher than that, it could be the CPU is throttling back to prevent overheating. Did you apply thermal paste? As for case cooling, a single rear exhaust fan is generally all that's necessary. Did you run thru your BIOS settings to make sure the power outage didn't cause them to reset?

message edited by riider


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
September 6, 2013 at 11:50:56
It does run at much lower clock speed. I'm not a dumbass I know what I'm talking about. Now after graphics card upgrade it worked okay for about a week and than I noticed my cpu performance being lower than it usually is. I did a test on psu 16 pin cable and there was a shortage of vats and my new graphics card needs at least 400W where as my old PSU only had 650 so either way I had to replace it.

Now my cpu fan needed a replacement because those plastic pieces that attach to heatsink were broken off so it wouldn't hold cpu fan in place which would explain why overheating occurred. Now my regular cpu temp is 25C which is where it is at right now. Thermal paste was applied few days ago so that's not part of the problem.

BIOS settings haven't been changed. I'm very tempted to run HDD short and long tests I don't think its window causing for my pc to turn off I think its more of a hardware issue rather than OS issue.


Report •

#5
September 6, 2013 at 21:46:06
Could be hardware or software issues. Run Memtest as well as hard drive long test. If both work OK then run a system restore to before the power outages, then make sure that you have not loaded your old graphics drive, if so, the upgrade driver again.
Please note that when a graphics card specify's 400Watts, that is generally what they predict you will need with the average system set up with the average quality power supply. With a better quality power supply, you probably could get away with less (higher available 12Volt Amperage on a single high power rail).
Post your complete specs if you are interested in us verifying your requirements.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#6
September 7, 2013 at 11:14:08
"It does run at much lower clock speed. I'm not a dumbass I know what I'm talking about"

OK, then explain your situation more clearly. If the CPU isn't running at 3.0GHz, what speed IS it running at? And what program are you using to determine what the clock speed is? Could it simply be that you have SpeedStep enabled & the CPU is underclocking under light load conditions (as it should)?

"I did a test on psu 16 pin cable and there was a shortage of vats and my new graphics card needs at least 400W where as my old PSU only had 650 so either way I had to replace it"

Excuse my ignorance, but what is "vats"? 16-pin cable? Which one would that be? And I don't think there's a card out there that requires 400W (yet). If you had such a high power card, it would require power from the PCIe slot (75W) + two 8-pin PCIe plugs (150W each) & then some. Did you have to connect multiple aux power plugs to your card? How about posting the make/model of the card & I can tell you exactly how much power it actually consumes? Here's a list of some older cards to give you an idea, newer cards have become more efficient & generally don't require as much:

http://www.geeks3d.com/20100226/the...

Graphics card manufacturers are aware that most consumers are clueless when it comes to PSUs so they deliberately over-recommend the wattage requirement as a way to cover their butts. However, the requirement is NOT for the card alone, it's the minimum requirement for an entire system that has a particular graphics card installed.

EDIT: This database is more up to date: http://www.geeks3d.com/20090618/gra...

message edited by riider


Report •


Ask Question