significance of graphics card upgrade

September 28, 2010 at 02:41:18
Specs: Windows 7, i7 / 4g
Can some one explain to me what the significant of the graphics card is in a computer. When I think of a graphics card upgrade I think of improved graphics and better performance when playing movies or games. However, is it possible that a better graphics card could improve the performance of my computer in other areas. For example, it I am compiling a large program, is it possible that a better graphics card could lead to faster performance?

Also, is the graphics card the same as the GPU?

Thanks


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#1
September 28, 2010 at 04:05:29
A high performance graphics card will be of little value to you unless you are running graphics intensive progs such as modern games, CAD or video-editing.

GPU stands for Graphics Processing Unit and refers to the processing chip on the graphics card.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#2
September 28, 2010 at 05:49:51
GPU = Graphics Processing Unit. Although many people refer to video cards as GPUs, it's really the primary chip that's used on the graphics card.

IGP = Integrated Graphics Processor. It's a GPU that's built into a motherboard. IGP's generally share the system memory & use the CPU to help display graphics.

I agree that a "high performance" card is of little value if you don't do anything that makes use of it, but adding an inexpensive dedicated video card can boost overall performance by eliminating the sharing of system memory & the CPU usage due to the integrated graphics.




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#3
September 28, 2010 at 06:29:54
Just as a faster hard disk will improve disk performance, a faster graphics card will improve graphics performance. For most applications the performance of the graphics card is of little or no importance. This is why high performance server systems have very basic video systems, because it has no impact on what they do.

But for best performance it is important that the video system does not use system memory, as many modern cards do.


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Related Solutions

#4
September 29, 2010 at 01:14:18
Thanks for those responses. Is there any way to tell weather I have an IPG or not?


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#5
September 29, 2010 at 02:21:46
Very simple. Look at the rear of the case.

The motherboard lies flat along the side of the case. and if you have onboard graphics (IGP) the connection will be in line with all the other motherboard connectors

If you have a plug-in graphics card the connector will be in one of the vertical slots at 90 Deg to the motherboard connectors

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#6
September 29, 2010 at 03:27:02
What about for a laptop?

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#7
September 29, 2010 at 03:33:16
labtops always have igp's all graphics chips in a labtop are integrated built into the motherboard basically no card fits in a labtop..lol

computers are a second home
NVIDIA GeForce
toxict51


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