secound hdd disapear

Hewlett-packard / Proliant ml310
March 2, 2009 at 04:35:21
Specs: win2003 , 4gb
hi there i have HP proliant ml310 server
with 2HDD at bay 1 and bay 2.
each one have 72 GB .ihave installed win2003 OS everything ok but when i want to make D partition i didnot find the unlocated space. only c: partition that appeas may i have solutin please.

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#1
March 2, 2009 at 07:55:57
Does the second hard drive show up in the mboard's bios Setup?

Did you may any changes to the connections inside the case, or were you fiddling inside the case, before you installed the operating system?

Are the drives in a RAID mode, as in, did you set up a RAID array before you installed the operating system. or was one already set up?
(If you did, the operating system may see the two drives as one. If you made a single partition during Setup that uses the entire space, there is no unallocated space left to make another partition from. )

Did you install the drivers for the mboard after Setup was finished?

Whenever you load Windows from a regular Windows CD (or DVD) from scratch, after Setup is finished you must load the drivers for the mboard, particularly the main chipset drivers, in order for Windows to have the proper drivers for and information about your mboard hardware, including it's AGP or PCI-E, ACPI, USB 2.0 if it has it, and hard drive controller support. If you have a generic system and have the CD that came with the mboard, all the necessary drivers are on it. If you load drivers from the web, brand name system builders and mboard makers often DO NOT have the main chipset drivers listed in the downloads for your model - in that case you must go to the maker of the main chipset's web site, get the drivers, and load them.


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#2
March 2, 2009 at 21:51:52
thanks in advanced. about your questions
1-Does the second hard drive show up in the mboard's bios Setup?
yes
2-Did you may any changes to the connections inside the case?
yes i have installed a controller.
3- did you set up a RAID array before you installed the operating system. or was one already set up?
yes.
4-Did you install the drivers for the mboard after Setup was finished?
no

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#3
March 3, 2009 at 13:55:13
When a RAID array has been set up before you install the operating system, the operating system may then see the two drives as one. If you made a single partition during Setup that uses the entire space, there is no unallocated space left to make another partition from.

What type of RAID array is set up?

""Did you may any changes to the connections inside the case?""
"yes i have installed a controller."

If you mean a drive controller card, are both drives connected to it?
Is it a PCI or PCI-E card?
SATA or IDE or SCSI?


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Related Solutions

#4
March 3, 2009 at 23:14:13
Q-Is it a PCI or PCI-E card?
SATA or IDE or SCSI?


A-1- the controller card is PCI with SATA connection and both drivers are connected to it.
2- the RAID is 1+0 type


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#5
March 4, 2009 at 07:15:05
""1-Does the second hard drive show up in the mboard's bios Setup?""
"yes"

"...the controller card is PCI with SATA connection and both drivers are connected to it."

OK, then there is probably no problem regarding the drives, the controller, or the drive's connections to the controller.

If there were, you would probably be getting an error message related to the RAID array, probably every time you booted the computer.
.........

The way your RAID array is set up, the operating system sees the partition(s) on both drives as being on one 72gb drive. If you made the RAID array use the max allowable amount of drive space, the operating system sees the two drives as one 72gb drive, minus whatever space is taken up by the RAID array formatting, and minus the space taken up by the operating system partitioning and formatting. There is no unallocated space left with which you can make a D partition.

I haven't used any type of RAID myself, but in theory, I would think that if you re-made the RAID array so you did NOT use the entire space on both drives, the remaining space would be seen as the D partition in the operating system, if you could make a second partition with the RAID array set up, or you could make a D and an E partition with the operating system, if you can leave that remaining space un-allocated in the RAID array set up. If not, I would think you would need a third hard drive.
........

References:

http://searchstorage.techtarget.com...

Excerpts:

RAID-1: This type is also known as disk mirroring and consists of at least two drives that duplicate the storage of data.

RAID-3: This type uses striping and dedicates one drive to storing parity information. The embedded error checking (ECC) information is used to detect errors.

RAID-10: Combining RAID-0 and RAID-1 is often referred to as RAID-10, which offers higher performance than RAID-1 but at much higher cost. There are two subtypes: In RAID-0+1, data is organized as stripes across multiple disks, and then the striped disk sets are mirrored.
In RAID-1+0, the data is mirrored and the mirrors are striped.

........

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redund...

Excerpts:

RAID 1 (mirrored settings/disks) could be described as a real-time backup solution. Two (or more) disks each store exactly the same data, at the same time, and at all times. Data is not lost as long as one disk survives. Total capacity of the array is simply the capacity of one disk. At any given instant, each disk in the array is simply identical to every other disk in the array.
....

Principles
RAID combines two or more physical hard disks into a single logical unit by using either special hardware or software. Hardware solutions often are designed to present themselves to the attached system as a single hard drive, so that the operating system would be unaware of the technical workings. For example, you might configure a 1TB RAID 5 array using three 500GB hard drives in hardware RAID, the operating system would simply be presented with a "single" 1TB disk. Software solutions are typically implemented in the operating system and would present the RAID drive as a single drive to applications running upon the operating system.

There are three key concepts in RAID: mirroring, the copying of data to more than one disk; striping, the splitting of data across more than one disk; and error correction, where redundant data is stored to allow problems to be detected and possibly fixed (known as fault tolerance).


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#6
March 5, 2009 at 04:06:12
tahnks Tubesandwires for your help the problem has been solved
your instractions were great .

best regards


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