Second HD not recognized outside of bios

March 18, 2011 at 08:55:30
Specs: Windows XP
I recently installed a second hd on my dell4700. I have never installed one before, but didn't think I would have problems. I can turn on the new drive in Bios, but then the computer refuses to boot. The only way to get the computer to run Windows XP is to turn OFF the new drive which of course defeats the issue. What do I do at this point? The new drive is not in my device manager or my computer, it only shows up in Bios.

See More: Second HD not recognized outside of bios

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#1
March 18, 2011 at 09:17:54
I'm curious to know how you know the drive doesn't show up in Device Manager if you can't get the computer to boot with it switched on?

Anyway, ignoring that, have you checked the boot order in the BIOS to make sure that it is not trying to boot off the new drive? If so, change it so that the original disk is the boot device. If you can then boot with the drive turned on, you will need to go into Disk Management in Windows to partition and format the drive before you can use it.


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#2
March 18, 2011 at 09:42:00
I turn on the computer and go to BIOS. I turn on the new drive and it gives me an error message that says it cannot boot. No matter how many times I hit f1 it will not boot. I return to BIOS and turn off the new drive and the computer will now boot. The new drive shows up in BIOS, but not in Device Manager. Maybe it would show up in Device Manager if I could get it to boot, but I can't get it to do that at this point. Sorry I was not clear before.
How do I change the boot order? It does show up in SATA 0. My old drive is in SATA 1. How can I switch them?
Where is Disk Management?

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#3
March 18, 2011 at 10:25:06
Ok, I found the boot order, but it only lists one internal SATA drive. When I go into BIOS to Drives, it shows my new drive as SATA 0 and my old drive as SATA 1, but how do I switch them when it only shows one drive in the boot sequence menu?

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Related Solutions

#4
March 18, 2011 at 10:41:04
The drive with the OS should be SATA 0, the storage drive can be anything else. Once the 2nd HDD is properly recognized, it should be selectable in the boot order, even though it's not configured to boot.

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#5
March 18, 2011 at 10:56:15
How do I get the working drive with the OS on to be SATA 0?

My boot sequence looks like this:
1.Onboard or USB FLOPPY drive
2.Onboard SATA HD
3.Onboard IDE HD (not present)
4.Onboard or CD ROM drive
5.USB device (not present)

When I enter into this list I can change the order, but not really anything else. I do not see a second SATA drive.... is it listed as something else?


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#6
March 18, 2011 at 10:58:53
A quick fix may be to swap the SATA data cables on the drives to see if that makes the original disk SATA 0. Dells are something of a law unto themselves.

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#7
March 18, 2011 at 11:16:23
"I recently installed a second hd....."

A new hard drive, or a used hard drive that has had it's partitions deleted, is NOT bootable.
It must have an operating system installed on at least one partition on the hard drive for it to be detected as bootable by the bios, and it must have had at least one partition type that Windows recognizes made on it - e.g.NTFS - and that partition must be formatted.
......

"How do I change the boot order?"

When you connect more than one hard drive, the bios determines which drive it tries to boot from first depending on which SATA header the drives are connected to, by default, if there are no IDE hard drives connected complicating the situation.
E.g.if the original SATA drive is connected to the SATA 0 or similar header, the bios will try to boot from that drive by default before any other hard drive.
If the first hard drive the bios tries to boot from is NOT bootable, it WILL NOT try to boot from any other hard drive.

If when you connect the second SATA drive the bios tries to boot from a hard drive that is not bootable, you can either

- change which SATA header the second drive is connected to so that it's connected to a higher numbered SATA header

- or go into the bios Setup and set the settings so the bootable hard drive is the one the bios tries to boot from first.

There is either
-a list of hard drives in the bios, often near the boot order or similar settings - the model number of the hard drive you want to boot from must be listed first, Save bios settings

- or - less likely - there is no list of hard drives in the bios but there is more than one hard drive listed in the Boot Order or similar list - the hard drive you want to boot from must be listed first, Save bios settings.
If they're not listed by their model number, they're listed generically, according to the order in which the bios detects them while booting, according to which data header they are connected to ,and in the case of IDE drives, also according to how the drive itself is jumpered - e.g. HDD0, HDD1, etc.
........

"Where is Disk Management?"

Control Panel - Classic view - Administrative Tools - Computer Management - Disk Management.

If you just want to use the second drive for storing data,
- set the bios to boot from your already bootable drive or change the SATA header the second drive connects to so that it's a connected to a higher numbered SATA header than the already bootable drive.
- go into Disk Management and make at least one partition on the drive - it will have the drive use the NTFS partition type by default,and format the partition in one combo step.
........

Side notes....

If you want to have two Windows installations, you need a Product Key for the second installation that is different from the one for the first one, in order for it to be legal as far as Microsoft is concerned.

If you boot the computer from an XP CD to install Windows on the blank drive, the first thing you do is to choose the blank drive and you then make at least one partition on the drive using a partition type that Windows recognizes on it - e.g. NTFS - and that partition is formatted. Then you run Setup.

NOTE that the files initially loaded by the XP CD may NOT detect ANY SATA drives depending on a setting in the bios Setup, because the XP CD has no built in SATA drive controller drivers. We can tell you what to do about that.

By default the second installation of 2000 or XP will NOT see it's own Windows installation as being installed on C when Setup detects that there are already hard drive partitions that have been assigned a drive letter present when Setup is run. Setup will assign a higher drive letter than C for the hard drive partition it's own Windows installation is being installed on.
If you want both Windows installations to see it's own Windows installation as being installed on C, in this case, disconnect the original hard drive's SATA data cable BEFORE you run Setup from the Windows CD, then after Setup has finished, you can re-connect the original hard drive (you may need to tweak which drive the bios tries to boot from first in the bios) , and do a simple procedure to make your computer a dual boot system where you can choose which Windows installation to load from first thing while loading Windows.
.......

If you want to make more than one partition on the second drive in Disk Management, or if you want to install a second operating system on the second drive and have more than one partition on it....

Windows Setup defaults to making only one partition on a hard drive (or, a brand name software installation usually has only one visible - in Windows itself - partition on the single hard drive) .
The problem with that is if you ever need to re-load Windows (or the original brand name software installation) from scratch, you lose everything on the partition Windows was installed on, and when you have only one (visible) partition on the hard drive, that's everything on the drive - unless you copy the data you don't want to lose to elsewhere BEFORE you install Windows from scratch (most people don't bother, and lose all their data) .

If you're installing XP from a regular CD, it's recommended you make at least TWO partitions on the drive.
How to make more than one partition on a hard drive, when you're installing Windows on a blank hard drive, or when you are deleting the existing partition(s) on a hard drive before you run Setup .....
See Response 3:
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...
......



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#8
March 18, 2011 at 11:21:00
You don't need to swap the cables. There is a SECOND option in the BIOS (setup) screens to choose WHICH hard drive to boot to. The BIOS has a nasty habit of automatically designating the latest installed hard drive as the first hard drive in the boot order. Look for that option on a later screen in the BIOS.


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#9
March 18, 2011 at 11:41:18
"You don't need to swap the cables."

You may be right. But I take a pragmatic approach. If it fixes the problem....


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#10
March 18, 2011 at 11:44:01
ok, I switched the cables and wala! it works, boot up fine, told me I had new hardware, everything, woohoo! Now, I am trying to figure out what to do when I partition it because evidently that is what I have to do to use it... I didn't know this was so complicated to do or I might have just had someone else do it.... replacing the motherboard wasn't this bad! Do I have to reinstall windows onto the new hd to make it work? Can I simply clone the old hd to the new one or do I have to do partition the new hd before I can clone onto it? I have read various posts on partitioning the hd and I am just not understanding exactly what I am doing....

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#11
March 18, 2011 at 12:09:34
"Do I have to reinstall windows onto the new hd to make it work?"

NO.
If you just want to store data on it, see the part starting at "Where is Disk Management?" in response 7.

NO,
- unless you want two installation of Windows on the computer - you would need a second Product Key for that -

or - unless your present Windows installation is really messed up and you want to install a fresh installation of it

In either case, if you have personal data you don't want to lose on the present Windows installation, if you are going to be deleting the original C partition, you will need to back up or copy the data to elsewhere FIRST, BEFORE you load Windows from scratch.

Installing Windows from scratch takes less than an hour but that's only the first step. Drivers must be installed, Windows must be updated, etc.,etc. It may take you many days until you get the Windows back to more or less the way you want it to be with the programs you want to use and your personal data installed.


"Can I simply clone the old hd to the new one "

Yes.
That's the easiest choice if your present Windows installation is working okay.

NOTE that if you would be copying an originally supplied by DELL hard drive, there is an additional thing you need to be made aware of BEFORE you attempt to clone it with whatever program.

You can get a free drive preparation program available from either of the brands of hard drives connected to the computer's web sites that will copy the entire contents of a physical drive to another physical drive. If the destination drive is smaller or larger you can make adjustments regarding how large the partitions on the destination drive are so that the whole of the drive is used.
E.g.The Seagate web site has MaxBlast and another program that can do that,if you have at least one Seagate or Maxtor hard drive connected to the computer. The MaxBlast version is a slightly crippled version of Acronis drive preparation software- Western Digital has a program that is a similar situation with it's Data Lifeguard Tools.
You can either install MaxBlast or the other program Seagate has on the original drive - you must have enough free space on the original drive to install the program and additional free space to run the program
0r -you can install either MaxBlast or the other program Seagate has on any computer that has a Seagate or Maxtor hard drive connected to it, and then make a bootable CD that has the Dos version of the program on it with which you can do the same things, and boot your computer from that CD and use that Dos version to do the same thing.

Once you have done that, you then make it so the bios boots from the larger drive.

Once you are sure everything on the larger drive works fine, you can do whatever you like with the data on the original drive.


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#12
March 18, 2011 at 12:34:07
Thank you all for your help, I appreciate it very much! I have to go get my kids today so working on the hd will have to wait until tomorrow, but I think I will just clone over as all I need is more space and there is nothing wrong with my current version of Windows... I really to appreciate the help... thanks!

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#13
March 18, 2011 at 12:41:53
No, no, no. Don't do complicated things like cloning your existing install. You're almost there. It's very simple to set up your drive.

Have a look at this step-by-step guide. It will take you five minutes or less.


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#14
March 18, 2011 at 15:28:02
Ok, ijack, I won't! I got back read your message and I figured it all out thanks to the guide you provided me a link for. There seemed to be a couple of steps missing at the end, but I got it. The drive is formatting as I type and should be good to go here in a bit. Thank you again for all your help!

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