Screen no signal input problem

March 24, 2010 at 06:56:56
Specs: Windows 7
Hey,
So... I have an Haier LCD for my computer,
which worked perfecr for about year and a
half...
Then, out of the blue, something like 5 weeks
ago it start doing problems and crash...
Right now I can only use the computer in safe
mode, when i start the computer normally, it
does a black screen an writes "No signal
input"... so I can do nothing...
when the computer worked partially, I was
starting to play some game and it just stuck,
and start doing problems, here you can see an
example for a problem when the computer
used to work partially (as i said, now i canwt
even work on it (but only with safe mode):
http://img233.imageshack.us/img233/...

What should I do? Please help me...

P.S
I hope you will understand my bad english...


See More: Screen no signal input problem

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#1
March 24, 2010 at 07:33:51
It sounds very much like a problem with your graphics card - probably overheating or some other fault. Almost certainly nothing wrong with your monitor.

Without more information it is difficult to tell you what to do. Post your system specs, especially the graphics card and someone might be able to offer a solution.

BTW. Nothing wrong with your English - a lot better than some native English speakers I have seen.

Stuart


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#2
March 24, 2010 at 07:55:09
Thanks for helping...
I print-screened from EVEREST my computer's information...
So if you need to know some more just say it...
http://img188.imageshack.us/img188/...

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#3
March 24, 2010 at 08:01:23
(I started making this post before there were any replies)

Tell us the make and model of your brand name system, or if you have a generic desktop system, the make and model of the mboard.
The specific model of a brand name system is shown on a label on the outside of the case somewhere, or it can often be determined by going to the brand name's web site.
The model, sometimes the make, of a mboard in a generic desktop system is usually printed on the mboard's surface in obvious larger characters, often between the slots.

The model is often also displayed on a logo (graphical) screen early in the boot, but it's often not as specific as the specific model number.

For Dell computers, they have a Service Tag number - the specific model can be determined by using that on their site, or can often be determined there automatically by you downloading some software. The Service Tag number should be on a label on the outside of the case, probably on the bottom on a laptop, on the back on a desktop, and is often also shown in the bios Setup.
........

If you have a desktop (or tower) computer are using a video card that's in a mboard slot, tell us the make and model of the card.
Or, in Safe mode
Control Panel - Classic View - Device Manager
Open up the Display adapters category - tell us what display adapter is listed there.
..........

You could try it with another computer, but there's probably nothing wrong with the monitor.

You can have problems with software related to the video in Windows such that you do get normal video while booting until Windows is supposed to load when you boot normally , but then there is no video in Windows - some monitors will display "no signal input" or similar when that happens.

When you boot into Safe mode, only default VGA drivers are loaded that all video chipsets support instead of the specific drivers for your video chipset. If you try to display something that only looks as it should if more colors can be displayed, e.g. 16 bit or 32 bit, it will look crappy, that's NORMAL, because you can't display that many colors when the default VGA drivers are loaded.


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Related Solutions

#4
March 24, 2010 at 08:46:55
So you have...

Windows 7 Ultimate


MSI K9N SLI (MS-7250 v2)

3 PCI, 1PCI-E X1, 2 PCI-E X16, 4 DDR2 DIMM

4096mb ram

Chipset : nVidia nforce 570 SLI, AMD Hammer

nVidia Geforce 8400GS video
........

Since it appears this mboard model does not have onboard video, the Geforce 8400GS video must be on a card in a slot.
I look on the web finds that....
- your video card would have at least a heat sink, or a fan and heat sink
- a minimum of a 350watt power supply is recommended, 18 amps or more for +12v.

What's the max output capacity and max amperage (xxA ) at +12v of your power supply?
- read it's label.

Unplug the case/power supply, or switch off the AC power to it otherwise.
Power off your monitor.
Open up the case by removing the left side panel as seen when you're looking at the front of the case.
Check all the connections of the wiring to make sure they are all the way onto their pins and into their sockets, especially the main connector from the power supply. The wires close to the mboard going into the main power connector/socket should be more or less perpendicular to the mboard surface rather than at an angle. Make sure all cards in slots are all the way down in their slots.

While you're in there, if the cpu fan/heatsink has mung (dust, lint, etc.) on it, clean it off, but DO NOT use a vaccuum cleaner to do that (they produce a tremendous amount of static electricity when running, and anything connected to them can discharge that to your components) - use canned air, or an air nozzle if you have access to an air compressor, or an artist's brush that can be used in small spaces, etc. It may be difficult to clean the top of the heatsink under the cpu fan - the most likely place to have mung on it - and the bottom side of the cpu fan blades unless you remove the fan. If you have a case fan, clean that too if it needs it.

Also check for mung on the video card fan and heatsink if it has that, and the power supply's openings / fan.

With the cover still off, restore the AC power, start the computer and
- make sure the fan on the video card spins. If it doesn't spin, your video card's video chipset may already be damaged from it overheating, but you could try replacing the fan.
If the video is fine when you first start up the computer after it has had a chance to cool to room temperature, and it works okay until the computer and the video card has warmed up, then the video is bad, replacing the fan will probably cure your problem.

- make sure the cpu fan spins - if it doesn't spin, if you're sure the power supply is working okay, don't use the computer until you have replaced it.
If it spins too slowly, and/or if it makes rattling or screeching noises, most likely to be noticed when the computer has cooled to room temp, has not been used for a while, and then is started up, the cpu fan's bearings are failing - the cpu is likely to overheat as a result of that if it can no longer spin it's full speed - replace it as soon as you can.


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#5
March 24, 2010 at 08:54:39
I think tubesandwires has covred all the possibilities in his own inimitable way. Nothing much more to add.

Stuart


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#6
March 24, 2010 at 18:31:37
If the video fan spins, if that applies, and if the Safe mode video is okay considering it's limited, if you get no video when Windows is supposed to load in normal mode...

Remove any bootable CDs or DVDs from drives.
Press F8 repeatedly while booting, don't hold down the key, and when the boot choices menu appears, choose
Enable low resolution video.
Your computer will boot normally except that the display will be forced to use default VGA settings that all monitors support.

RIGHT click on a blank area of the main desktop screen, choose Properties - Personalize - Display Settings - Advanced Settings - Monitor - Properties - Driver - Update Driver - Browse my computer.... - Let me pick from a list... - Next - choose (click on it to highlight it) Generic PNP monitor if it's listed - Next
( if Generic PNP monitor is not listed, click on the small box beside Show compatible hardware to remove the checkmark - Standard monitor Types - choose Generic PNP monitor - Next)
(OR - if you have the CD that came with the monitor that has the specific drivers for the monitor, or a download that has the specific drivers for the model, click on Have disk lower right, Next, and go to where the drivers are - Windows is looking for an *.inf file. NOTE that if the monitor is LCD or Plasma, you should load the specific drivers if they are available, because you can choose settings in Generic PNP Monitor mode that can DAMAGE the monitor ! )
Close (or if you chose specific drivers, if there is a list of models, choose the correct one, etc. )
click on Close on the Driver window.
click on OK on the Monitor window.
click on OK on the Display Settings Window
close the Personalization window.

When you Restart or start the computer after that, the subject monitor should display fine in Windows.


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#7
April 5, 2010 at 19:26:15
Ok so I just did what you said on the fourth respose... lets see if it helped

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#8
April 5, 2010 at 20:01:34
So.. just for your information, already before I did what you
said, Windows could somehow work normally (not on safe
mode) so my problems are just in games...

I think that i saw all of the fans work good...

I didnt really get what you said about the "max amparage" but
i saw i have EZ Cool ATX-300 JSP 300W... and under
+12VDC i think the max. output was 18A...

Anyways....
should I buy a new graphic card or what?


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#9
April 6, 2010 at 07:27:01
I said in Response 4 ...

"...the Geforce 8400GS video must be on a card in a slot.
I look on the web finds that....
- your video card would have at least a heat sink, or a fan and heat sink
- a minimum of a 350watt power supply is recommended, 18 amps or more for +12v. "

You said...

".....i saw i have EZ Cool ATX-300 JSP 300W... and under
+12VDC i think the max. output was 18A..."

A = Amps; 18A = the max. amperage rating for +12v

The amperage rating at +12v equals the minimum for the video chipset , but the total (D.C. output) wattage rating does not.

Your power supply is running at 100% of it's max capacity, or nearly so, all the time, when the Geforce 8400GS video card is installed.
According to info I've read, from several sources, the max (output) capacity of a computer power supply is an intermittent rating - NOT a continuous or sustained rating - the power supply is not supposed to run at it's max capacity all the time .
When the power supply is running at that rating all the time, or nearly so, it's likely the power supply will eventually be damaged.

"....so my problems are just in games."
Games tend to make the video card's video chipset use the most current, which draws the most current from the power supply.

"should I buy a new graphic card or what?"

If your video is NOT fine when you first boot the computer after the computer has had a chance to cool to room temp, and for a while after that, if you're sure the video card is all the way down in it's slot (you could also try removing the card, when the AC power to the case has been removed of course, wiping off the contacts on the bottom or the card, installing it again) then your video card must be damaged, and you must replace it.
........

If your video is fine when you first boot the computer after the computer has had a chance to cool to room temp, and for a while after that, and you only have video problems after the computer has fully warmed up....

Your problems will probably be cured by you getting a power supply that has a higher (output) capacity.
At least 350 watts - more wouldn't hurt, and when you're a gamer, it's recommended you multiply that by 1.25 to determine the minimum capacity = 437.5 watts minimum - the closest common standard wattage would probably be 450.
If you want to be able to use a video card in the future that draws more current, get at least a 600 watt one, or higher.
......

In any case, you probably need to get a power supply with more capacity. If you get a card with different video chipset, the capacity of the PS must be at least the minimum recommended for a system with the video chipset that's on the card, and better still, when you're a gamer, it should be at least 1.25 X that minimum.
.......

You can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS with the same capacity or greater.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...


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#10
April 6, 2010 at 08:06:56
thanks! but how come, until now, about a year and a half, the
games worked (almost) perfect...?

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#11
April 6, 2010 at 11:09:43
- computer power supplies deteriorate as time goes by in any case - the electrolytic capacitors age, mostly.
If the capacity of the power supply exceeds the minimum your system requires to support the video chipset, then that usually doesn't cause a problem, but in your case, it doesn't exceed the minimum .

- and in your case
According to info I've read, from several sources, the max (output) capacity of a computer power supply is an intermittent rating - NOT a continuous or sustained rating - the power supply is not supposed to run at it's max capacity all the time .
When the power supply is running at that rating all the time, or nearly so, it's likely the power supply will eventually be damaged.

The power supply is also running hotter when it's running at 100% of it's capacity, or nearly so. That doesn't do it any good either.


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#12
October 16, 2010 at 16:49:22
i had the same problem and tried many thing, but the only way to correct is to uninstall display drivers in safe mode and re-install this corrected my problem. after doing some googleing on the problem, i dose seem to be something with the video card and HD displays, also windows vista or 7 , WDM 1.1 (direct x 11)

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#13
October 17, 2010 at 08:22:04
shyguy311

Video drivers that were working fine previously don't spontaneously stop working, assuming there's nothing else wrong such as data is corrupted on the hard drive for whatever reason, but sometimes when you change the video drivers version, after the next time you boot, you will get video while booting until Windows is supposed to load, but not after that in Windows. That's caused by the video drivers not detecting the monitor type correctly, and sometimes in that case, you get no video in Windows at all.
I've also seen cases where that happens after the first time you install the specific video drivers, so un-installing the video drivers then re-installing them doesn't always cure the problem.
It can also happen sometimes when you change which monitor you're using, if the new monitor can't display using the settings the display was previously set to. E.g. If you changed from a good quality CRT monitor to a cheap LCD monitor, and if the video drivers don't detect the new monitor correctly and don't change the monitor settings.

That situation is easily fixed without having to un-install the video drivers and install them again by doing the procedure in response # 6.
You do that in Enable VGA mode for XP and previous, or in Enable low resolution video mode for Vista and Windows 7, because you can't change the monitor settings in Safe mode.

Also, in some cases, you can't un-install the video drivers in Safe mode, but you can always do that in Enable VGA mode or in Enable low resolution video mode.

The DirectX version has nothing to do with the problem. If Windows has an older (lower) DirectX version loaded, you still have video, but fancy features supported only by a higher DirectX version are auto replaced with simpler features. The same applies if the Direct X version supported by the video chipset is lower than the version of DirectX loaded in Windows. You can't load a DirectX version higher than 9.x in XP and below, but you can load higher versions in Vista and Windows 7.
.....

When you DO install video drivers, or any major software, it can be very important to DISABLE any resident modules of any anti-malware software you have installed on the computer from loading - a part (or parts) that run(s) all the time in the background looking for suspicious activity - BEFORE you install the software, otherwise the software may not install properly, and you will probably get no messages about it not having installed properly in that case.
E.g. for AVG, you should disable the Resident Shield from running.
If you don't know how to do that, tell us which anti-malware software you have installed on the computer.
......

Sound and video "drivers" always have associated files that must be installed properly along with the actual drivers. If you install only the actual drivers, it's likely the device will NOT work properly.

Unless the instructions for installing a device tell you otherwise.......
You DO NOT install drivers for a device while booting into Windows, if the software for the device has not been installed yet - when Windows detects a generic device or New Hardware while booting, you allow it to search for drivers, it doesn't find any, and it wants you to show it the location of the drivers - CANCEL that, continue on to the desktop, and install the software for the device using the proper installation from a CD or the proper installation file that you downloaded from the web.

If you DID install drivers that way, go to Control Panel - Classic View - Programs and Features and Un-install the software you installed, reboot, DO NOT install drivers while booting, and install the software the right way !
The same applies no matter when Windows finds New Hardware !

Go into your mboard's bios and make sure the setting Primary video or Intiallize video first or similar is set to the correct setting.
E.g. if your video is on a removable PCI-E X 16 card installed in a mboard slot, that should be set to PCI-E or similar, not Onboard video or PCI or similar.
If that setting is wrong, you will still have video in Windows, but the fancy features supported by the specific video drivers won't work as they should.


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#14
October 24, 2010 at 12:18:58
THANK YOU SO MUCH!! I was reading through all these posts and after reading your reply, realized my fan on my grafix card wasnt spinning!!! Took it out now i have signal back to monitor! Again Thanks!!!

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#15
October 29, 2010 at 16:40:22
Lizb9411

You must replace that fan, if you haven't already done so, otherwise the video chipset that it cools will overheat and malfunction, probably starting a short time after you have booted the computer from a cooled off state. The video chipset will be damaged if it gets hot beyond a certain temp, and may never work again.
Local places that sell lots of computer parts have suitable fans.


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