Removable drive and boot issues

Biostar group / U8668-d
March 27, 2009 at 10:18:12
Specs: Windows XP Home
In order to do data recovery, I have a removable drive bay (Promise SuperSwap 1000) that I tried in vain to use on IDE channel 0. No matter which jumper options I selected, no combination would allow Windows to boot when the removable bay was connected. So I connected it to IDE channel 1 along with my DVD burner. The jumper on the drive in the SuperSwap is set to master (according to the guidance from Dave M at Kroll OnTrack). Again I was running into boot issues until I made the DVD burner also 'master'. (Boot issue different than when removable bay was on IDE 0. In that instance I got the 'No boot device found' error - this time the Windows splash appears, but the progress bar just spins). I would love to get an understanding of both issues: 1) why I couldn't get it to work on IDE 0, and 2) why it works on IDE 1 with both devices config'd as 'master'.
Thanks,
Wayniack!

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#1
March 27, 2009 at 11:47:04
What kind of backup is on the removable drive? If you are trying to connect the removable to the same port as your WinXP drive how were you planning on applying the backup to the WinXP drive?

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#2
March 27, 2009 at 12:37:23
It sounds you've got the jumper information for the drive in the Promise SuperSwap 1000, and/or possibly the other drive, wrong.
When two drives are actually jumpered master on the same data cable neither drive is recognized.
You must be confusing a jumper setting for cable select or slave with one for master
The jumper information on the label on the hard drive can be confusing, especially if it's upside down in relation to the back of the drive - if the label shows the relative position of the power connector in relation to the jumpers, go by that.
On optical drives, there are usually markings near the three pairs of pins on the back of the drive, but they may be just imprinted into black plastic and difficult to make out except with good lighting.
Or see the drive manufacturer's jumper information for that drive model.

Different makes and different models of the same make do not necessarily have the same jumper setting arrangement.

Some hard drive models (e.g. some WD) have TWO ways of setting master - one for master by itself (e.g. master single) , the other for master when there is another drive on the same data cable (e.g. master with slave present) - make sure you get that right.

Apparently the Promise SuperSwap 1000 is ATA 133 compatible, so the data cable connection in it has 80 wires and that will work with any hard drive.

All 80 wire data cables have a blue connector on one end - that end MUST go to the mboard!

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittant, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.

That may apply to a short data cable inside the Promise SuperSwap 1000 as well.
.......

If you're going to be removing the drive from the Promise SuperSwap 1000 regularly, the drive in it should be jumpered slave, the other one master, or both drives on the same data cable should be jumpered cable select - that way you don't have to change jumpering when you unplug the drive.

Don't mix cable select and master/slave jumpering for 2 drives on the same data cable - some combinations will work anyway, some will NOT.

If you use cable select jumpering, a single drive is supposed to be on the END connector of the 3 connector data cable - on newer mboards the drive may be detected anyway as slave when by itself and on the middle connector, but on older mboards the drive won't be recognized at all if by itself on the middle connector.


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#3
March 27, 2009 at 12:57:09
To add a minor correction to the description of 80 wire IDE cables.

I have in my possession a number of 80 wire cables with red connectors on the motherboard end and one with a yellow connector on the MBoard end. All have the grey and black as described. I believe these cables are older hardware from the time of the switch over. If memory serves the ports on the motherboards were color coded to match. Those odd cables all came with motherboards.


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Related Solutions

#4
March 28, 2009 at 08:17:42
"All 80 wire data cables have a blue connector on one end - that end MUST go to the mboard!"

"To add a minor correction to the description of 80 wire IDE cables.

I have in my possession a number of 80 wire cables with red connectors on the motherboard end and one with a yellow connector on the MBoard end. All have the grey and black as described."

All the ones I have with the exception of one - generic, and ones that came with Asus and MSI mboards - and that I have seen on other computers, do have a blue connector on one end, so obviously that's often the case.
The one exception is one that has a red connector that I wasn't aware of until I looked at it just now because I hadn't used it yet.
I have seen some 80 wire ATA 66 cables where both drive connectors are black.

Okay then, I'll amend my statement from now to to something such as....

If the data cable has 80 wires, the end connector on a three connector data cable that is farther from the middle connector MUST go to the mboard header - usually that connector is blue.


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#5
March 28, 2009 at 08:30:01
tubes, not trying to nitpick but I am pretty sure there are lots of those odd colored cables out there. The one common factor is the grey center and black end connectors on ALL the 80 wire cables.

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#6
March 28, 2009 at 12:41:39
Even that isn't a given.
Note that I said...
"I have seen some 80 wire ATA 66 cables where both drive connectors are black."

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#7
March 28, 2009 at 12:53:31
Well, anyway back to the OPs issue. Sounds like the removable drive is configured to replace the original boot drive. How will that repair the original drive? Unless the OP returns this thread is going no where.

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#8
March 28, 2009 at 14:16:28
Yes, unless he posts further this may be just another never resolved Topic.

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