Solved question on UPS compatibility on US vs Asia

July 12, 2015 at 12:18:03
Specs: Windows 7, I7-2600 / 8 gig
i will be moving from the US to the philippines down the road. i have a general question no one seems to know the answer to. so thought i would stop here. are UPS able to be used in the the US AND the philippines or not?? how do i find out?? thanks in advance

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✔ Best Answer
July 13, 2015 at 11:50:58
thanks again. i just chatted with APC.. they told me they dont offer any UPS with dual voltage. their quote was .. "we do not have UPS' that can take a dual input voltage; only dual outputs from a 208V circuit".. but they did give me the name of a reseller that can sell me a UPS for the philippines. again thanks all


#1
July 12, 2015 at 12:44:09
Like a lot of electrical equipment nowadays, most UPSs are dual voltage so there should be no problem. Just check that it will work on 220 volts.

But why not contact the manufacturer (e.g. APS) and ask for their recomendation?


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#2
July 12, 2015 at 13:04:37
i tried the manufacturer. i got some guy from india who diidnt know anything about UPS,, referred me to a number that was disconnected. i am trying to find out for sure if its usable. i mean on my PC on my PSU.. ihave a switch that can change. but i dont find that on the UPS.. i dont find anything written on the cable that indicates it can handle both voltages..

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#3
July 12, 2015 at 13:35:19
I find it difficult to believe that a representative of APC (sorry, I got that wrong in my last post) wouldn't know anything about UPS. That is what their business is all about.

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#4
July 12, 2015 at 14:09:55
Have you had a look on the "label/sticker" on your UPS? If it's (still) affixed, then it ought to show the voltages specifications. Equally the manual for your UPS ought to give mains/line voltage in specs,; as ought the website(tech support/specs) for your UPS?

Most "current/modern" kit auto-senses the incoming line/mains voltage; and ensures what's created within the system's psu is OK - having sensed (one hopes) correctly the incoming voltage.

Older kit of course often had the incoming voltage selector on the back; either jumper or a switch. I still have a trés elderly Dell Dimension ('98 vintage) and an even older vanilla 386sx system; both have manual/jumper (plug) selection for the incoming line/mains voltage setting.

Bearing in mind Canada/USA are on 120volts - nominal; can vary a little (sometimes slightly less...); and the Philippines are on 220volts... and both use different plugs/sockets to each other..., you will need either an adapter for your USA plugs to fit into the Philippines sockets; or you change the plug on your UPS. Likely too you may have "other IT kit too? Presuming so I'd take a few spare adapters; or be prepared to change those plugs too?

These links may also be of use...?

http://www.worldstandards.eu/electr...

http://www.worldstandards.eu/electr...


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#5
July 12, 2015 at 14:24:22
@ijack: The OP did not mention APC as the brand of UPS.

If the manual is misplaced you should be able to download nearly any manual these days from the mfg's website. There has to be an electrical specs page there that needs to be complete and as mentioned, the label on the UPS should also have the important data, look mainly for input voltage, if it lists only 120VAC then it will not work there without a transformer and then the cycles may not be right either (50 Cycles vs 60 Cycles per second for US) which probably will matter as well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
July 12, 2015 at 14:45:32
If it's really "olde" - 120volts 60~ and not auto-sensing..., and you "do" use a step down transformer (220v-120v), I doubt the frequency effect will impinge...

I have had no problems using 230v/50~ - 120v/60~ transformers with some of my (olde) 120v/60~ kit... Just ensure you have a transformer adequately spec'd to deliver the power (watts = volts x current) required; ideally over spec. it slightly as its for a critical piece of kit (a UPS)?

And if "we" knew the actual make/model of your UPS then pholks here might be able to advise more specifically?

message edited by trvlr


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#7
July 12, 2015 at 14:49:11
I got the impression that the OP had not yet purchased a UPS. If he has then a make and model would be useful information. But, in a more general sense, I would be extremely surprised if the representative of any company offering UPSs didn't know about UPSs.

Almost all modern equipment can be switched between 110 volts and 220 volts. The frequency of the mains is irrelevant. A new power cord will probably be needed.

Edit: The plugs and the frequency in the Phillipines are the same as the USA, so it's only the voltage that differs.

message edited by ijack


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#8
July 12, 2015 at 16:52:13
the UPS is a Belkin f6C900-uv.. i called Belkin and first he wanted to know if it was under warranty.. i said i got it 6 years ago and my question was not on repair...on the belkin website.. i used that f6C number to find my product.. yet the guy told me that i needed the model number. that is all i found on the UPS.. then i asked him simply if he coudl generally tell if a UPS will work over seas and how to find out. all he kept saying was.. you need to call this number and it was disconnected..

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#9
July 12, 2015 at 16:58:51
ok i went back to belkin and found the manual and i guess it wont work. for voltage range it shows 89-145 vac.. i know on other products that will work it will say like 110 - 220 or something like that correct??

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#10
July 12, 2015 at 17:02:46
This is the "manual"

http://www.belkin.com/support/dl/61...

and it shows the volts in as anything between 89 - 145

so you would require a step down transformer and one can handle a little more than the Belkin requires.


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#11
July 12, 2015 at 17:27:25
I would advice you to bring as less as possible electrical equipment that runs solely on 110-120 VAC. Sell the appliances if possible.
Sooner or later someone will accidentally plug it in the 220-240VAC. The wall sockets are the same as used in the USA; 2 flat prongs with or without round (earth) prong.

message edited by sluc


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#12
July 12, 2015 at 21:27:50
Since it is 6 years old, it is not worth the weight it is to get it over there. Look into ordering a new one to be shipped there just before leaving or find out if they will be available locally which probably be cheaper than shipping one in.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#13
July 12, 2015 at 23:46:49
Good/sound advice from "sluc" and "Fingers"...

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#14
July 13, 2015 at 00:53:21
The manufacturers reckon that UPS batteries are good for 3-5 years. Unless you have replaced the ones in yours they are near the end of their working life anyway.

I agree that it is not worth the expense of shipping this. Just buy a new one in the Philippines.


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#15
July 13, 2015 at 02:50:18
i have replaced the batteries about a year and a half ago.. i may end up buying one over there but i know that will not be cheap,, we are actually selling everything including all appliances except a couple of thins.. one which i was kind of surprised. our 42 inch hd tv which DOES show 110-240 v and i already confirmed with the manufacturer that the signal i think. ntsc is the same over there. .. but the rest will be bought over there. mainly i was just curious if i can use this over there. actually when looking up NEW UPS online here. the most range was 89-145V.. so i guess none of the ones here will work over seas unless of course you get the transformer.. i appreciate all the help guys.. thanks much .

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#16
July 13, 2015 at 04:11:59
Being an UPS and thus "critical" to your needs(?) I would seriously incline to a new one (220v model) so as to be sure your IT kit is securely maintained. This does of course presume the budget and other considerations will allow it...

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#17
July 13, 2015 at 07:06:17
Most, if not all, of the APC UPSs are dual-voltage. They are excellent kit.

The Philippines uses NTSC for analog TV, but that is being phased out by the end of this year. You may need to check that the digital tuner in your TV will work with the ISDB-T digital standard which they are adopting. But set-top boxes are pretty cheap, so this may not be a problem.


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#18
July 13, 2015 at 11:50:58
✔ Best Answer
thanks again. i just chatted with APC.. they told me they dont offer any UPS with dual voltage. their quote was .. "we do not have UPS' that can take a dual input voltage; only dual outputs from a 208V circuit".. but they did give me the name of a reseller that can sell me a UPS for the philippines. again thanks all

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