Solved PSU failed now fan to Heatsync is running and monitor blank

January 10, 2013 at 12:17:18
Specs: Windows XP, Pentium 4
Hello
I have a power problem and the supply to the house dropped to a level where there wasnt enough power coming into property to run TV Radio stripLights etc etc. but the power ran low wattage 240v bulbs.
I guess there was around 50 or so volts coming into house for an hour before power went fully.
after the power went and came back I found the computer would not start.
I traced fault to the PSU power supply not working so replaced it
but now Fan to Heat sync and case run full power but no signel/power to Monitor and keyboard is showing no power, although lights for a second when computer is powered up.
I assume the Board is calling for full cooling power to the Heat sync Fan.
is this done by the CPU ?

is it possible that the Pentium 4 CPU has burnt out by heat sync fan not running when power dropped ?

there is no sign of Heating or blown capacitors to any part of Mother Board.

There was a smell of burning from computer when power fault happened.

I need to access Hard Drive to down load data stored. would the Hard drive have burn out also ?

sorry if this was all long winded but would like to keep computer if its just the CPU that needs replacing.

Many thanks

David


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✔ Best Answer
January 10, 2013 at 18:32:29
The low power could cause some problems, but if not unplugged, the power returning could have been in a surge and that coulod cause even more problems.
I agree that this could easily caused your power supply to burn out, but the chance that it took something else out with it, especially if it was a cheap model, is also very good. Motherboard, memory, video, hard drive, and even possibly your CPU could be bad. Testing is best rather than purchasing at random.
Attaching your hard drive as a second drive on another desktop or by mounting it in an external case, will both let you know if the drive is good, and let you make additional copies of any data that is on the drive that you might need.
In your area, you should use a UPS (Uninterruptable Power Supply), often called a Battery Back Up which can run your system for short periods of time when the power goes low or out and if the power is not restored soon, give you time to safely shut down the system. Better UPS's include software to do this for you (safe shut down) if the system is unattended for a while. In the long run, this can save you a lot of money, time, and hassle.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
January 10, 2013 at 12:37:08
If your RAM and CD drive is working you can backup your own files onto a flash drive using a Live Linux CD. As you can also access your HD with Linux it might help give you a clue where the trouble lies. Here is the info:

=====================================
LINUX LIVE CD (from a general note of mine).

I use Puppy Linux 4.3.1. as it is simple and saves nothing to the HD, so I will use that as my example:

On a working computer, first download the file pup-431.iso from here:
http://iso.linuxquestions.org/downl...

DO NOT RUN the file but save it somewhere instead. This is known as an image (.iso). You then have to burn a CD from the image, which does NOT mean just burning the download onto the CD. Most burning software has an "image burning" feature and you use this to create a CD from the downloaded image. In the unlikely event that your burning software has no such feature there are various free programs which will do this. For example, ImgBurn, which you can get here:
http://filehippo.com/download_imgburn/
With this program, when you run it you select "Write image file to disk".

Once you have a CD you put it in the drive of the faulty computer then power on and Linux should start loading. If it still starts Windows it is because the CD drive loads after the HD. To fix this you go into BIOS and set the CD ahead of the HD and Save settings - best leave it that way. How you get to BIOS varies with computers but often it is either a case of tapping F2 or Del key while booting.

Puppy is slow first time but during shutdown you can get it to Save your settings back onto the CD, so that it boots faster next time. It runs between RAM and the HD so it does not change anything in Windows, which will work quite normally when you boot without the CD.

The Linux desktop has your drive icons at the bottom left. Everything is single click. It is possible to view your Windows files on the HD and copy them onto a flash drive by drag and drop. Obviously you don't delete any Windows files from then HD unless you really intend to do so. Note that Linux shows the HD file structure exactly "as is" (unlike Windows which often presents you with what MS want you to imagine).

It takes a lot of words to describe all this but it is much easier than in sounds.
=====================================

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
January 10, 2013 at 13:07:24
Thanks for the reply. but there is no power to anything apart from the Fans (2) and power on Light at front plus CD opens but dont run when closed.

Have taken the CPU out and it has the outer pins on center square slightly higher than the inner sets so I guess it has Blown and these protruding Pins are causing uneven seating of all square contacts on inner section of the CPU is a Pentium4 sl7yu


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#3
January 10, 2013 at 13:22:18
Sorry I missed the point about "nothing working at all". Maybe Puppy Linux will be of use on some other occasion.

Yes, when voltage drops way outside spec there is a chance that the current will try to increase which could be why both the PSU and CPU took a hit. Just hope there is nothing else lurking.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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Related Solutions

#4
January 10, 2013 at 13:24:59
"I traced fault to the PSU power supply not working so replaced it"

That may or may not have been the problem. It would help to post the make/model & specs of both the old & new PSUs. Are you from India by any chance?


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#5
January 10, 2013 at 13:29:01
I can't guess what might be wrong with the computer. That is an unusual occurrence. That said, you should be able to remove the hard drive and either connect it internally to another computer or use an external case or adapter to access the hard drive.

See the link below for a very handy adapter that will allow you to run any IDE or SATA drive of any size. 2.5", 3.5" or even 5.25 optical drives. Newegg.com only sells to the USA & Canada but you should be able to find the adapter locally.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...


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#6
January 10, 2013 at 13:42:15
OK thanks Have ordered a replacement CPU so will see what the weekend brings. £16 for PSU and £5 for CPU would rather give them a try before replacing the Unit.
Cant see any signs of Damage to anything else.
so upto £50 on a gamble would be better than buying a new unit.

Riider; am in UK but rural, so power plays up when high winds and Rain. (overhead supply) there was no power comming from PSU when connected, replaced with same model and light on on/off switch came on so 1 fault was it.

If need be will get converter as required. its a Sata HD so conversion set may be needed but will wait and see.

Have Most files on Memory Stick but there are some Docs that are on Hard Drive. inc Invoices and Job Sheets. just didnt back up when should have "Typical"
Using the Kids Laptop for present is less than Ideal.


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#7
January 10, 2013 at 16:12:01
£5 = $8 US. That's about all a P4 is worth these days.

£16 = $26 US. You generally can't get a decent quailty PSU for that amount unless it's on sale & a rebate is involved.

You should be troubleshooting, not randomly replacing parts.


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#8
January 10, 2013 at 18:32:29
✔ Best Answer
The low power could cause some problems, but if not unplugged, the power returning could have been in a surge and that coulod cause even more problems.
I agree that this could easily caused your power supply to burn out, but the chance that it took something else out with it, especially if it was a cheap model, is also very good. Motherboard, memory, video, hard drive, and even possibly your CPU could be bad. Testing is best rather than purchasing at random.
Attaching your hard drive as a second drive on another desktop or by mounting it in an external case, will both let you know if the drive is good, and let you make additional copies of any data that is on the drive that you might need.
In your area, you should use a UPS (Uninterruptable Power Supply), often called a Battery Back Up which can run your system for short periods of time when the power goes low or out and if the power is not restored soon, give you time to safely shut down the system. Better UPS's include software to do this for you (safe shut down) if the system is unattended for a while. In the long run, this can save you a lot of money, time, and hassle.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
January 11, 2013 at 02:44:09
thanks for the swift replies, all a great help.

Riider; bay items bought to test it. CPU is Gteed and PSU is same as was fitted Bestec ATX. reclaimed most prob but works fine and power from it is stable and constant so will try.


Fingers; agree but for amount spent its a fraction of what a replacement will cost. although if CPU dont fix it, then will look at replacing the unit.
Dont play games or watch DVDs on the computer its purely for Emails, Letters, and work. plus internet searching.
so have no need for a top grade machine a 1-2gb ram & 80gb hd is plenty good enough for the job.
but will look for a UPS thanks.


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#10
January 12, 2013 at 05:59:37
UpDate !!!!

still not worked with new CPU installed.
So I guess the Mother Board is Damaged.

PSU £16
CPU £ 5
time to cut the Losses esp
as still have to find out if HDD is working and secure.

replacement machine ordered.

if or Can I install the existing SATA HDD into the replacement machine and leave it there ?

will any harm be done having two HDDs both 80gb each in the same machine ?

replacement machine bid on is a 2gb ram and 80gb HDD as may used one for the Picture and Photo storage and one for work & files etc

will adding a second HDD make it 160gb ??? or is there a power/capacity drop off ?

as said I dont play games on Comp or watch TV etc so high powered one not required for the job intended.

Thanks for your Help.


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#11
January 12, 2013 at 07:40:30
I don't have much experience, but if I'd seen this thread
earlier I would have said that the motherboard was the
most likely part to go. The PSU is first in line, but the
motherboard has a wide variety of more sensitive bits,
and the CPU is protected by the motherboard.

Adding a second hard drive to a computer should never
be a problem.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#12
January 13, 2013 at 16:16:37
Whenever I purchased or built a new computer to replace an old one, I first got everything running, then installed the old hard drive as a second hard drive, that way it is never confused as the bootable drive. After copying important files from the old drive onto the new drive, I use Disk Manager and delete all old partitions, then create a new partition and format it (NTFS for XP, Vista, Windows 7 and presumably Windows 8) for a completely clean partition to use for storage or as a back up destination.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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