Power on problem after cleaning CPU

Micro-star international G31m3-f v2 desk...
April 30, 2010 at 07:39:45
Specs: windows vista
2days ago i decided to clean up my dirty cpu full of dust.. i clean in and vacuum it smoothly and successfully returned all the parts to there places but i do have a big trouble about my processors fan , its kinda hard to push it back to its 4 holes so i didnt know if i pushed it hard or what so ever but i did return it back and clip it.. suddenly when trying to start it up ... there's no response at all, no lights even the fan of cpu is not moving or even the fan of my case or graphics card, so i leave it for a couple of hours plugged.after then i tried to power it up again and it works, but the blue light which indicates that the cpu is turned on has no light, and the monitor has no display, but the red light is blinking and i can open the cdrom so weird.. letting it opened and waiting for a couple of minutes doing nothing the blue light will lights on and the monitor will now starting up very normally and seems nothings happened same performance.. so i really thought my problem is over but the other day when trying opening it up again the same problem appears and over and over again...

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#1
April 30, 2010 at 08:00:52
"2days ago i decided to clean up my dirty cpu full of dust.. i clean in and vacuum it ..."

Your computer case is NOT A CPU !

DO NOT use a vacuum cleaner to do that (they produce a tremendous amount of static electricity when running, and anything connected to them can discharge that to your components) - use canned air, or an air nozzle if you have access to an air compressor, or an artist's brush that can be used in small spaces, etc.

Assuming you haven't already damaged something when you vacuumed the computer interior...

You might have knocked something loose or have forgotten to plug something back in.

Unplug the case/power supply, or switch off the AC power to it otherwise.
Power off your monitor.
Open up the case
Check all the connections of the wiring to make sure they are all the way onto their pins and into their sockets, especially the main connector from the power supply. The wires close to the mboard going into the main power connector/socket should be more or less perpendicular to the mboard surface rather than at an angle. Make sure all cards in slots are all the way down in their slots.

Consult your mboard manual if you need to.

See response 2 in this - make sure the ram modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...



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#2
April 30, 2010 at 08:26:14
Please let me explain it to simple way sorry for my bad english
Okay when i plug my cpu now . it didnt work even if press power button hundred times. nothing really works no responds. so , letting it plugged in after 10 to 15minutes gonna try it pressing power button again and yes it works but now all, two of them are missing 1 is the blue light"inidicates that the cpu is turned on" 2 - monitor no display ... so again waiting for a couple of minutes 10 to 15mins again the blue light will light up - the monitor puts up display and normally smoothly continuing to windows... Even if i restarted it , it still run perfectly..but leaving it turned on for a couple of hours and then trying to plug it and turn it on , again the problem will start from the very start.. I just gonna need to know what is the cause of this weird stressing problem,
Specs
MotherBoard. msi g31m3
Processor. cor2quad q9400 2.66ghz

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#3
April 30, 2010 at 09:14:31
If you want to piss people off around here, keep calling your computer a CPU. A CPU is a socketed chip that fits in a motherboard. You are NOT plugging in your CPU, you are plugging in your computer.

And as Tubes explained, you should NEVER use a vacuum on electrical parts due to the static charge that can build up in the hose.

Since the heatsink/cooling fan was removed, it should have been thoroughly cleaned of all dust & old thermal material, a fresh strip of thermal paste should have been applied to the top of the CPU, then the heatsink reinstalled. NEVER install a heatsink without thermal paste & NEVER reuse old thermal material.

Installing the Intel socket 775 CPU Heatsink Correctly


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#4
April 30, 2010 at 09:23:12
but why is it my pc run is running out normally again? and why there's a factor of waiting my PC to be plugged for a couple of minutes before it start out and wait again for the pc to start booting .. then after an hour when pc is turned off the process will repeat again itself during powering up .

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#5
May 1, 2010 at 07:22:56
It sounds like either your power supply has a poor connection, or the power supply is in the beginning of the process of failing.

You could try this...

Unplug the case/power supply, or switch off the AC power to it otherwise.
Power off your monitor.
Unplug the main connector from the power supply to the mboard, plug it back in.
The wires close to the mboard going into the main power connector/socket should be more or less perpendicular to the mboard surface rather than at an angle. Make sure all cards in slots are all the way down in their slots.

There is probably a smaller connector from the power supply that plugs into a smaller socket on the mboard - unplug it, plug it back in.

Make sure that the connector for the power switch is no loose on the pins for that on the mboard - see your mboard manual if you need to.

Restore the AC power to the computer and try it.
.....

If that doesn't help, I suspect the power supply is in the beginning of the process of failing.

Failing power supplies are common and can cause your symptoms.
E.g. They often will not boot the mboard properly intermittently in the beginning stages of failing.
Check your PS.

See response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

If it is failing, you can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS with the same capacity or greater.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD ! )
If that info is not in the ad for the video card, you can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. Some power supplies have two or more +12v ratings - in that case, add those ratings to determine the total +12v current capacity.

If you're a gamer...
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittent rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.


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#6
May 1, 2010 at 11:51:56
"i clean in and vacuum " I have been using a vacume for around ten years with no problems what so ever. I do not recomend it as everyone that I know and trust with computers says don't use one. Also I take precautions.

"but i do have a big trouble about my processors fan , its kinda hard to push it back to its 4 holes so i didnt know if i pushed it hard or what so ever but i did return it back and clip it" I mean no offense but if you have limited skill with computers then maybe you should not have removed the processor fan/heatsink. Now that you have however you need to do it again and clean the old thermal paste off of both the cpu chip and the heatsink and replace it with new. I have seen this cause issues whereas the cpu heats very quickly and the bios reads that temp and shuts it down before getting too hot. This can happen before you notice. When you replace the fan/heatsink be very careful it is rather easy to warp or crack the motherbard. This too can cause issues where the cpu does not seat properly.

"suddenly when trying to start it up ... there's no response at all, no lights even the fan of cpu is not moving or even the fan of my case or graphics card" How about the power supply fan? Is it spinning at this point? This sounds like one of two things to me, just as Tubesandwires has suggested. In the past year I have seen many psu failures and they are almost all different. I had one of my own that when I hit the power button all of my lights and fans would come one but the harddrive would not spin and I had no power to the motherboard. I have seen them go all together no power what so ever and I have seen them fail a little at a time. I have also seen them work today and not work tomorrow but work the next day. It sounds like if you leave it on long enough it (the bad connection) heats up, heat causes expansion, thereby causing a connection. This may be a plug in connection or an internal connection in the psu.

Remember this is fragile equipment. It doesn't take much to cause it to fail. If it is a loose plug in connection this can can eventually cause a short that can take out not only the psu but the motherbaord and the cpu as well.

Like has been stated: The box, case, tower, mini tower, desktop that holds all of your internal components is not the CPU or Processor.

Likely


I want to go like my grandfather did. Peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming at the top of my lungs like the passengers in his car.

(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")


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