Solved Playing game, suddenly black screen and stuck in EFI Shell

January 27, 2016 at 04:35:55
Specs: Windows 7
I was playing Witcher 3 yesterday and suddenly the screen turned black. Then, it restarted and stuck in EFI Shell.

My PC's spec
CPU: Intel i7 4770
Motherboard: MSI H87-G43
RAM: Kingston (forgot the model)
GPU: Sapphire Vapor-x 7970
PSU: Antec HCG-620M
windows 7
with one SSD, one HDD and one optical drive

I guess why I stuck in EFI Shell because all the SSD, HDD and optical drive cannot be detected. I can go into bios and use the the BOARD EXPLORER to view the hardware. I found all six SATA ports show empty but others can be shown in the EXPLORER. What happens to the drives? I have tried

1. clear CMOS
2. unplug the SATA cables and plug into different ports

but no luck. And I have tried to plug the SSD into another PC and can boot into my windows 7 so I think the SSD has no problem.

Also, I want to ask a question about the optical drive. Do the optical drive need to be detected to eject the tray? I have plugged power cable into the optical drive and it has no response totally. Is problem about the PSU? However, the motherboard, GPU, CPU fan and chassis fan can turn on.

Can someone tell me how to fix?


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✔ Best Answer
January 27, 2016 at 09:02:51
Different rails can have different behavior. Does the HDD spin up? If so, you're probably looking at an SATA failure. If not, the test would be to have a second PSU supply its power, and see if it can be seen from your PC's BIOS. The good news is you could use the power supply from a SATA to USB set to supply that power. There are also power supply testers you could try out, but I've seen PSUs pass such tests until they're put under load.

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#1
January 27, 2016 at 05:53:13
The PSU could have failed; try the optical drive in another computer / with another PSU. Failling that, I'm going to have to go out on a limb, and say it sounds like you had a power spike beyond what your surge suppressor could handle. If that's the case, you'll have to replace the optical drive, the motherboard, and possibly the power supply. And the surge suppressor.

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#2
January 27, 2016 at 06:20:19
Are you saying that the optical drive do not need to be detected by BIOS for ejecting the tray, given that the drive is no problem and is connected to power supply?

Also, I can go into BIOS. Does this mean that the motherboard is probably okay?


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#3
January 27, 2016 at 07:44:01
It depends on the optical disk, but generally having power is enough for the drive to spin up / eject disks.

And no, from the sounds of it, the SATA controller's damaged, or possibly the PCH. Until proof is presented otherwise, I'm going to assume the board has lost its I/O capabilities.

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message edited by Razor2.3


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Related Solutions

#4
January 27, 2016 at 08:48:20
I/O capabilities means SATA or USB? I just insert a external USB and the motherboard can detect it. It is very wired if the PSU has problem because it can provide power for GPU, Motherboard and chassis fan but not the SSD, HDD and DVD drive. I have tested the SSD, HDD and DVD drive in another PC and all drives are working. I can't explain...

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#5
January 27, 2016 at 09:02:51
✔ Best Answer
Different rails can have different behavior. Does the HDD spin up? If so, you're probably looking at an SATA failure. If not, the test would be to have a second PSU supply its power, and see if it can be seen from your PC's BIOS. The good news is you could use the power supply from a SATA to USB set to supply that power. There are also power supply testers you could try out, but I've seen PSUs pass such tests until they're put under load.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#6
January 27, 2016 at 09:15:26
ssd and hdd can be accessed in another PC and dvd drive can also eject tray. I guess the problem is probably the PSU. I don't have another PSU for testing in PC and don't want to use PSU in another PC because it is trouble to take it off.

See if anyone has similar experience and reasons of this problem.


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#7
January 27, 2016 at 09:42:46
Well, if you can't afford $10 to test, I'm not sure what to tell you. If you have a voltmeter, you can back probe the PSU with the power on. That'll give you the most accurate results, but you do need a molex plug on the same rail as your disks and you need to know how to use said meter. Remember, the black is ground, the yellow is 5v (± 5%), and the red is 12v (± 5%).

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