PCMIA USB2 Cardbus

June 16, 2010 at 08:27:47
Specs: Windows XP, SP3

Hi, I am trying to upgrade my laptop to use USB2 via one of the two Cardbus ports to access an external USB hard drive.
I read the specs to determine whether the laptop would support a Type II, PCMCIA USB2 card. The specs stated it could take 2 x Type II Cardbus cards, or 1 x 32 bit Type III, Cardbus. I assumed the 2xType II Cardbus cards were 32 bit and ordered a Type II, 32 bit USB2 card accordingly.
However inserting the NEC USB2 Cardbus causes the mouse to freeze and there are no signs of detection from hot loading the card once in Windows desktop.
I have also successfully updated all recommended files and Bios for Windows XP, SP3.
*Can you advise whether the laptop takes 32 bit, Type II Cardbus cards? If so, is there a routine I can follow to get the 4 port USB2 Cardbus operational? Please note on examining the error log in Admin Tools I note an error is occuring on insertion of the USB2, 4-port PCMCIA Cardbus with the "System", "Event 10".
I'd appreciate your advice on this matter since the Cardbus is readily inserted into the PCMCIA card slot suggesting it is 32-bit, but it may not be.
Cheers, Tim

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#1
June 16, 2010 at 09:19:34

There are PCMCIA Type II slots and cards, and the newer PCMCIA Cardbus Type II slots and cards.
All PCMCIA slots and cards that are Cardbus are 32 bit. You can use 16 bit cards in Cardbus slots as well as 32 bit ones, but you can't use 32 bit (Cardbus) cards in 16 bit slots.

Apparently, your relatively old laptop model
e.g.
http://www.toshiba.ca/web/product.g...

Intel® Celeron® at 650MHz; Intel® Pentium® III at 750MHz or 800MHz

does NOT support Cardbus.

Support - Europe - UK
, for one of the possible configurations
http://uk.computers.toshiba-europe....

Product Specs
http://uk.computers.toshiba-europe....

- 1 x PC Card slot for 2 Type II cards or 1 Type III card
- NO MENTION of CARDBUS

User Manual
http://uk.computers.toshiba-europe....

- NO mention of CARDBUS, 32 bit, or 32bit.

There is no such thing as a PCMCIA 16 bit (non Cardbus) USB 2.0 controller card

"# I have a old notebook computer with only a 16-bit slot. Is there a way I can get a 16-bit PC Card to support Firewire or USB 2.0?

While it may be technically possible to get these interfaces working on a 16-bit slot, it probably wouldn't work too well. The 16-bit interface has a maximum theoretical data rate of approximately 20MBytes/second. The actual maximum is probably closer to 1/4 or 1/2 of that (40 to 80Mbits/sec). USB 2.0 is spec'ed at 480Mbits/sec and Firewire is 400Mbits/sec. The data rates of these modern interfaces are too high for the 16-bit PC Card interface and 386/486/P1 class machines. We know of no 16-bit PC Cards that support these modern interfaces. "

http://www.sycard.com/pcard_qa.html...

I'm surprised that the USB 2.0 card will physically plug in, because usually a Cardbus / 32 bit card cannot be plugged into a 16 bit slot.

........


If your laptop did/does support Cardbus (32 bit) cards, or in any case, you often must install the drivers and associated software for the card BEFORE you plug it in the first time - see the installation directions that came/come with the card, or consult the manual for it.


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#2
June 16, 2010 at 09:47:15

Hi again, thanks for your comments in relation to my Toshiba Pro 4600 laptop. I remain somewhat confused. I assume only the Cardbus has a copper grounding strip with 8 goose bumps. If so, I have a NetOne 108mb/s Wireless PCMCIA, Type II card with copper grounding strip and 8 goose bumps functioning in the lower PCMCIA slot. I understand this slot can also accommodate a 16 bit PC-Card. Given the wireless card fits the above description of a 'Cardbus' and is working fine then am I right in assuming the second slot must also take a 32-bit Cardbus?
Am I missing something here? If not, and it is a 32 bit Cardbus, then how do I overcome it freezing the computer up during installation?
Oh, just read your comments if laptop does support Cardbus. Your recommendation that I load software prior to adding Cardbus makes sense. However the 4port USB2 Cardbus received which was stated to be of NEC type (i.e. reliable) did not come with a hard copy or electronic manual for looking. The packaging whilst colourful doesn't even give the model number of the PCMCIA card purchased! The small CD-Rom has drivers for USB2 and what appears to be several brands of ther PCMCIA cards. Does anyone know routinely the drivers to load for a NEC USB2 card? This would assist my situation.
Cheers and thanks, Tim

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#3
June 16, 2010 at 10:01:34

Your model is old enough that it may or may not support Cardbus / 32 bit cards. In all the specs and manuals I've seen for laptops, if Cardbus / 32 bit cards are supported, that's mentioned, often many times.
There is nothing in the specs or the manual for your model series that indicates it supports Cardbus / 32 bit cards.
Older laptops don't support that.

The fact that Cardbus / 32bit cards will physically plug in is odd if the slots support only 16 bit cards, but it's quite possible the physical spec for the card slot that prevents that was not implemented on your model - maybe it wasn't a requirement yet back then.

Cardbus network cards don't necessarily run in 32 bit mode - that's not necessarily required for a network card, and there are still 16 bit network cards available.
........

"Am I missing something here? If not, and it is a 32 bit Cardbus, then how do I overcome it freezing the computer up during installation?"

As I said...

"If your laptop did/does support Cardbus (32 bit) cards, or in any case, you often must install the drivers and associated software for the card BEFORE you plug it in the first time - see the installation directions that came/come with the card, or consult the manual for it."

Sometimes drivers / software will NOT install properly unless you disable the resident module(s) of anti-malware software from running BEFORE you install the software.

For more info, see Response 6 in this, scroll down to
"Things I do see of concern in seawatch1's lines in Response 2....."
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...

The same things apply, except you disable ALL resident modules from running before installing the drivers / software.

Also, the main chipset drivers must have been installed in order for the PCMCIA slots to work properly. If the laptop still has it's original brand name software installation on it, those have been already installed, but this model probably did not come with XP on it....

XP doesn't have the drivers built in for most things that first came out after XP was first released, circa 2001, and it doesn't have some of the drivers built in for things made before that.

Whenever you load Windows from a regular Windows CD (or DVD) from scratch, after Setup is finished you must load the drivers for the mboard, particularly the main chipset drivers, in order for Windows to have the proper drivers for and information about your mboard hardware, including it's AGP or PCI-E, ACPI, USB 2.0 if it has it, and hard drive controller support. If you have a generic system and have the CD that came with the mboard, all the necessary drivers are on it. If you load drivers from the web, brand name system builders and mboard makers often DO NOT have the main chipset drivers listed in the downloads for your model - in that case you must go to the maker of the main chipset's web site, get the drivers, and load them.

Load the main chipset drivers first.
(Laptop main chipset drivers, not desktop main chipset drivers - the former includes drivers for devices found only on laptops.)
.......

The main chipset drivers MAY be built into XP for your relatively old main chipset, but they may have been corrupted. It does no harm to try loading the main chipset drivers again (in this case, the Intel INF Update Utility) and you don't have to iun-install anything before you do that.
NOTE that if the IAA (Intel Application Accelerator) is listed in the downloads for your main chipset, if it isn't already installed, you must install it in order for your hard and optical drives to be able to run as fast as they are capable of on your mboard.
If it has been installed, there is a Intel Application Accelerator listing in your Programs - when you run that, you can see what DMA mode the drives are running in.



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#4
June 16, 2010 at 10:37:41

Thanks for the tips. I guess I need to determine for sure whether my laptop is Cardbus compatible. On this matter I have referred to the following specs I have on the Satellite 4600 and note the following:
"TOSHIBA
Satellite® Pro 4600 Series
Expandability: 2 PC Card slots support two Type II or one Type III PC Cards,
32-bit CardBus ready".

And also in another laptop Manual: "2 x PC Card type II or 1 x PC Card type III, CardBus support, memory expansion, additional expansion possibilities via docking options";

And finally also in this Manual: "EXPANSION:
Two PC Card slots supporting either:
- 2 x Type II (5mm) PC Cards or 1 x Type III (10.5mm)
- 32-bit CardBus Compatible".

In your opinion with reference to these specs taken from 3 different manuals for the Satelite Pro 4600, do I have Cardbus (32 bit) or not? If I do have, then I can move forward and attempt to implement updating the main chipsets you mention. Can you inform where I find "Intel INF Update Utility" - I assume as an application on the laptop?
Cheers, Tim


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#5
June 16, 2010 at 11:54:44

"TOSHIBA
Satellite® Pro 4600 Series
Expandability: 2 PC Card slots support two Type II or one Type III PC Cards,
32-bit CardBus ready".

"...32-bit CardBus ready"

OK, that's encouraging, but I'm not sure what ready refers to. .

"And also in another laptop Manual: "2 x PC Card type II or 1 x PC Card type III, CardBus support, memory expansion, additional expansion possibilities via docking options";

And finally also in this Manual: "EXPANSION:
Two PC Card slots supporting either:
- 2 x Type II (5mm) PC Cards or 1 x Type III (10.5mm)
- 32-bit CardBus Compatible"."

What do you mean by "another laptop Manual"

If it isn't for your model series, that info doesn't necessarily apply.

There are Type I, II, and III cards that are NOT Cardbus / 32 bit, and Type II and III ones that are.


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#6
June 16, 2010 at 13:19:39

The Toshiba links for Support, the Specs, and the Manual time out, apparently

Go here:
http://eu.computers.toshiba-europe....

On the left
Support My Product
Click on Click here to find your laptop

Have it auto detect when you access the site with the 4600, or enter your serial number, or

Family - Satellite Pro
Series - the first one - Satellite Pro 4600
Model - any, or choose the one you have
........

No (Main) Chipset Drivers are listed for XP, but they are listed for 2000, so the main chipset drivers are built into XP.

I had do determine the Intel Main Chipset by searching on the web because that's not mentioned in the specs or the manual

E.g. in this, and at the link to the Polish web site below

chipset Intel 815EM.
http://ca.babelfish.yahoo.com/trans...

The ONLY evidence I've found that this model should support Cardbus cards is on the web....

Under Hardware:
Texas Instruments PCI-1410 CardBus Controller
http://www.roe.ac.uk/~hme/tosh4600/

This is on a Polish web site but it appears he ran some hardware identification program on a 4600:
http://forum.fedora.pl/index.php?s=...

So you have an Intel 815 family main chipset, Intel audio, an Intel NIC, and a Texas Instruments PCI 1410 Cardbus Controller

The (laptop) main chipset drivers should include the drivers for the Texas Instruments PCI 1410 Cardbus Controller - you SHOULD see that or similar listed in Device Manager - but if they don't or they're corrupted, you could search for drivers for just that.

E.g. Download Drivers - Other - Texas Instruments - pci-1410 - driver21012.zip

http://www.driverfiles.net/Other/Te...

Un-install any Texas Instruments PCI 1410 Cardbus Controller, or similar, drivers listed in Add Remove Programs beforehand, if you choose to try installing that.

Intel supplied drivers.
You have an Intel 815 main chipset, Intel audio, and an Intel NIC.
The the Texas Instruments PCI 1410 Cardbus Controller drivers should be included in (integrated into) the (815 family) (laptop) main chipset drivers.

Go here:
http://www.intel.com/p/en_US/suppor...

Select Auto detect and update software
or for just the main chipset drivers and the IAA, and the onboard graphics drivers,
Chipsets - Laptop Chipsets - Intel 815 chipset family - Download drivers and software
(takes you to here:
http://downloadcenter.intel.com/Sea... )

Select operating system

XP?

Optional -

Intel(R) 815 and 810 chipset family graphics driver (exe)
or go here:
http://downloadcenter.intel.com/T8C...

If you're using the onboard video, those drivers may be newer than the ones on the Toshiba web site. Un-install any onboard graphics drivers listed in Add Remove Programs beforehand if you choose to try installing these.

(Main Chipset Drivers)
INF Update Utility - Primarily for Intel® 800 Series Chipsets
It says:
"Did you just install the operating system? If you did not, then you do not need to install the Intel® Chipset Software Installation Utility."
which indicates they are probably built into XP, but you can load try loading them again if you think something to do with them may be corrupted.
or go here:
http://downloadcenter.intel.com/T8C...

The IAA is probably NOT available on the Toshiba web site. If, or when, it has been installed, Intel Application Accelerator is in your Programs list.
If it has not been installed, you should install this - it is required in order for your hard and optical drives to be able to run as fast as they are capable of on your mboard.
The IAA must be installed after the main chipset drivers have been installed. .

Scroll down to Performance Software - Intel® Application Accelerator - Primarily for mobile chipsets (Version 2.22)
or go here:
http://downloadcenter.intel.com/T8C...


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#7
June 16, 2010 at 14:41:16

Look for a bios setting that allows you to change some of the cardbus and mouse irq's. I had that issue with an older still laptop. I am pretty sure your system should support 32 bit.

I support the 'Everybody Draw Mohammed Day'. A religion doesn't deny my freedom.


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#8
June 17, 2010 at 06:38:18

"Tubesandwires" thanks very much for the excellent suport you have provided. Unfortunately as luck would have it I was in the Intel site and about to download the chipset drivers when they decided to take the site down for maintenance. So I will attempt to upgrade the laptop now over the weekend when I can get access and more time to make a go of it. I'll let you know how I go. You were indeed correct in stating that there is a Texas PCI 1410 Cardbus Controller in the Device Settings. I'll post the outcomes to updating the chipset drivers as mentioned.
Cheers, Tim

Jefro - had considered the possibility of a conflict and attempted to alter the mouse IRQ however the option to turn off the automatic sensing is greyed out. Then tried to alter the IRQ resource setting for the Texas PCI 1410 Cardbus Controller. Again this was greyed out preventing manual alteration. I did note however the mouse had an IRQ of 11 and the Texas PCI Cardbus 1410 an IRQ of 12. Thus not conflictual and system was not indicating a "conflict condition" for either also. I may persist with your suggestion if I have no luck with updating chipset. Cheers, Tim


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#9
June 17, 2010 at 06:56:18

If the bios has a setting PNP Aware OS or similar, changing the setting for that may help. E.g. if it's set to Yes, try changing that to No, save bios settings. That effects whether the bios or the operating system determines which IRQ is assigned to what, while booting, or in the operating system.



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#10
June 17, 2010 at 07:20:07

In this Topic, his PCMCIA wireless card was not detected while booting, but it was detected when he unplugged it and plugged it back in again while he was in Windows. Are you seeing an error in Device Manager when your USB card is plugged in?

See Response 5 and 6

http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...


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