PCMCIA card reader will not connect to PCI parallel card.

June 18, 2012 at 09:18:25
Specs: Windows 7
Have fitted a PCI parallel adaptor card to motherboard. Device Manager shows it working correctly, but when plugging in a PCMCIA card reader to parallel port it will not connect. The I/O address of the PCI card (003-007), is different to the LPT1 port on my old computer (0378 to 037F). How can I change the address of the card to that of the LPT1 port?
Any help greatly appreciated.

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#1
June 18, 2012 at 14:02:53
Which PCI parallel adaptor card ?

Which PCMCIA card reader ?

Note that parallel port adapters that are NOT a standard PCI card can usually support ONLY a connection to a parallel connected printer, or a connection to mutifunction parallel connected deviice for printing ONLY.

If it's a standard PCI parallel port card, or in any case...

...look in Device Manager.

E.g. double click on Computer - click on System Properties in the top bar, the link to Device Manager is on the left on the resulting screen

Look under Ports - double click on the LPT device - click on the Resources tab

If the Use automatic settings is not greyed out so that you can't use it, remove the checmark from the box before that and select an alternate configuration.
In some cases you may also be able to highlight the displayed I/O address and click on Change Setting to change it (there may be only ONE aternate configuration you can do that in). .


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#2
June 19, 2012 at 00:57:07
Thanks Tubesandwires,

The PCI parallel adaptor card is a StarTech PEX1P

The PCMCIA card reader has no manufacturers name on it (may be Metrum), but the card is made by Consillia.

I've already tried the Resource Tab, and the Use automatic setting is greyed out, and it will not let me highlight the address.

Is there anything else I can try?


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#3
June 19, 2012 at 08:51:05
"The PCI parallel adaptor card is a StarTech PEX1P"

1 Port PCI Express Dual Profile Parallel Adapter Card - SPP/EPP/ECP
http://ca.startech.com/Cards-Adapte...

It's not a PCI card - it's a PCI-E card.

The drivers must be installed correctly.
They are NOT built into the operating system - they're on the CD that came with the card.
Did you follow the installation instructions in the PEX1P.pdf manual on the CD, or in printed instructions that may have come with it ?

You should see PCI Express ECP Parallel Port listed under Ports (COM and LPT) in Device Manager

I have never installed a PCI-E parallel port card.
I assume....
- it would have the same standard I/O addreses available for it that a legacy parallel port built into a mboard can use, but there is no info ablout that in the docuemts on the StarTech web site.
- that any device that works with a parallel port built into a mboard or a PCI parallel port card will work.

Possible problem.
The IRQ for the PCI-E slot may be shared with another slot that has a device plugged into it that the PEX1P card is having a problem sharing resources with - that doesn't necessarily show up in Windows. If there is another PCI-E slot available that you can plug the PEX1P card into, try plugging the card into that slot instead.

Do you have a parallel connected printer available you could try with the PEX1P card ?
.......

"The PCMCIA card reader has no manufacturers name on it (may be Metrum), but the card is made by Consillia."

Search usding Metrum finds no significant "hits".
Apparently Consilia, one L, not two, is a Latin word. I get very few "hits" when I search using Consillia, more when I search using Consilia, but have found nothing related to PCMCIA , or PCMCIA card reader.

Is there a model number on it ?

Are you SURE it's a PCMCIA card reader and NOT a PCMCIA parallel port adapter ?

Here's some examples of PCMCIA card readers you connect to a parallel port:

Synochrotech PCM-CR-P1EX2
http://www.synchrotech.com/products...

Synochrotech PCM-CR-P1EX3
http://www.synchrotech.com/products...

A PCMCIA parallel port adapter would NOT have a a slot for plugging a PCMCIA card into.



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Related Solutions

#4
June 19, 2012 at 09:56:55
I have installed the drivers for the PCI-E card to the as per the instructions, and Device Manager is showing the card as LPT1 and working correctly. "Resources" shows the card as having I/O E010-E017, but no IRQ. There are 2 other slots available on mb, so I will try plugging the card in these.
As for the PCMCIA card reader, it has no identifying marks on it at all. It certainly is a card reader and not a parallel port adapter, as I have downloaded data from the card many times (to my old computer).
A search of the web has turned up a firm called Consillia over here in England, and I will get in touch with them if I can't resolve the problem.I will keep you updated. Thank you

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#5
June 19, 2012 at 10:47:11
"You should see PCI Express ECP Parallel Port listed under Ports (COM and LPT) in Device Manager."

Do you ?

"I/O E010-E017"
There are two standard I/O addresses, 0378 - 037F for LPT1, 0278 - ? for LPT2, and several alternates in Windows itself for LPTx, x being a number other than 1 or 2, that a legacy parallel port can use, but that's NOT one of them from what I've seen.

The legacy IRQ for a parallel port can only be either 7 or 5. Modern printers and multifunction printer etc. devices often don't require that, but other devices might.

You could check in System Information to see whether some other device is using IRQ 5 or 7.
Type: msinfo32 in the Start Search box, press Enter.
Look on the left side of the resulting screen under Hardware Resources - IRQs.

You could also look under Components - Problem devices but there's usually nothing there related to your problem.


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#6
June 19, 2012 at 13:29:05
The plot thickens!!
As stated previously the PCI Express ECP Parallel Port is showing in Device Manager.
However in System Information, under IRQ's, there is nothing under 5 or 7, but the PCI-E card (LPT1) is sharing IRQ 19 with Intel(R) Desktop/Workstations/Server Express Chipset SATA AHCI Controller. Do I need to assign the PCI Express ECP Parallel Port a separate IRQ and if so, how can that be achieved?

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#7
June 19, 2012 at 14:34:38
"As stated previously the PCI Express ECP Parallel Port is showing in Device Manager. "

You didn't state that specifically until response 6.

"the PCI-E card (LPT1) is sharing IRQ 19 with Intel(R) Desktop/Workstations/Server Express Chipset SATA AHCI Controller. Do I need to assign the PCI Express ECP Parallel Port a separate IRQ and if so, how can that be achieved?"

Some devices can share an IRQ without causing problems for any of the devices, but some devices have problems when that's the case.
E.g. for devices built into the mboard, or a video card installed in a slot sharing an IRQ with another video adapter, sharing an IRQ doesn't cause problems, but sharing an IRQ for a USB controller with devices not built into the mboard often does cause problems.

When the Use automatic settings IS greyed out in the Resources for the ECP port, then the only thing you can do is try installing the card in a different slot. Installing the PCI-E PEX1P card in a different PCI-E slot MAY result in the PEX1P card using an IRQ that only it is using.



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#8
June 19, 2012 at 16:11:48
Thank you for your prompt reply, Tubesandwires.

"As stated previously the PCI Express ECP Parallel Port is showing in Device Manager. "
You didn't state that specifically until response 6.

Response 4 states that:
I have installed the drivers for the PCI-E card to the as per the instructions, and Device Manager is showing the card as LPT1 and working correctly.

I am going to move the PCI-E card to both of the 2 other slots on the mb in turn, and see if that gives a unique IRQ to the card. Will keep you posted. Thanks, Filing Fairy


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#9
June 20, 2012 at 06:29:34
"Response 4 states that:
I have installed the drivers for the PCI-E card to the as per the instructions, and Device Manager is showing the card as LPT1 and working correctly."

You didn't state that it was showing it was an ECP port - that's not the same thing as a regular LPT port and would have been a problem if it wasn't doing that.

By the way, an ECP port requires that there is a spare DMA (Direct Memory Access) channel available - if one isn't available it can't work.
Is a DMA channel listed in the Resources for it ? I believe it can use either DMA channel 1 or 3.
Compare that to what you see listed in System Information - Hardware Resources - DMA.


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#10
June 20, 2012 at 09:52:26
Hi Tubesandwires,

By the way, an ECP port requires that there is a spare DMA (Direct Memory Access) channel available - if one isn't available it can't work.
Is a DMA channel listed in the Resources for it ?

There is no DMA channel listed in Resources for the ECP port.

Compare that to what you see listed in System Information - Hardware Resources - DMA.

DMA channel 04 is listed.


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#11
June 20, 2012 at 12:48:12
Okay then, DMA channel 1 or 3 are probably available, if it needs it.
THE DMA channel is necessary for a printer port that's built into the mboard for ECP mode, in all the modern mboard bioses I've seen. I don't know whether that applies to a parallel port card too. The card supports EPP mode too which doesn't require a DMA channel. Some parallel ports have circuitry that supports a combo EPP / ECP mode.

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#12
June 20, 2012 at 13:46:19
According to the StarTech literature, this PEX1P card supports both EPP and ECP modes, as you stated. The card is using ECP mode at present. What would I need to do to use the card in EPP mode?

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#13
June 20, 2012 at 15:20:10
Have you tried moving the card to a different PCI-E slot yet ?

For a parallel port that's built into the mboard, you can easily change the printer port mode in the bios settings. For a PCI or a PCI-E parallel port card, I have no idea how you would do that if you can't change any settings for it in Device Manager - Resources, or whether the appropriate mode is automatically selected when you plug in whatever device into the card's parallel port.

For devices that were made since the early 90's, most parallel connected devices have required that the printer port mode is set to either EPP or ECP mode. Most devices work fine in EPP mode, or eiither EPP or ECP mode, but there may be a few devices that only work in EPP mode, or that only work in ECP mode. Since we have no idea who made the PCMCIA card reader, it's not possible to determine whether that applies to that.

Do you have a parallel connected printer available, or can you borrow one, you could try with the PEX1P card ?


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#14
June 20, 2012 at 15:45:12
I'm going to try moving the card to the other two available slots tomorrow and see if that changes the mode to EPP. I have been told that PCI-E cards do not support ECP, in which case, as you state, it should work in EPP. The hunt for a parallel connected printer goes on, but no luck so far. I will keep you updated.

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#15
June 22, 2012 at 09:22:19
Hi Tubesandwires,

It would appear that a solution to my problem has been found by StarTech. Below is an extract from an e-mail I have received from their Technical Support;

"The three hexadecimal addresses commonly used for onboard parallel ports LPT1,2 and 3 (03BC, 0378, 0278); are absolute addresses, fixed in memory (BIOS).
Generally, the specific physical addresses mentioned above are required by security dongles, some older printers and old DOS applications.
If the parallel device you're using has such limitations, you should replace the PEX1P for the PCI1PM model, which has remappable I/O ranges for the parallel port. Please note that the PCI model is the only available model with such functionality at the moment".

I am going to replace the card and remap the I/O to 0378, which the card reader has worked on before.
I would like to thank you for your time and expertise.

Regards, FilingFairy


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#16
June 22, 2012 at 11:43:10
Okay, that's good info to be informed about.

In other words, you probably CAN select a different I/O address if you need to in the Resources settings in Device Manager for the PCI version of the parallel port card.

Thanks for the Thank you.

However...

Did you try moving the card to a different PCI-E slot yet ?

NOTE that I had a problem when I installed a Lava PCI parallel port card on one computer. It had a hidden (didn't show up in Windows) resource(s) conflict with the computer's ISA PnP SB16 (Creative / Sound Blaster) stereo audio card model - there was no audio from the SB16 card when the Lava PCI card was installed. I looked on the web and found that Lava card was known to cause that problem with many Sound Blaster audio adapters and cards, ISA and PCI, Lava knew about the problem, and there was no fix
I ended up using an ISA Multi I/O card that had an enhanced (capable of EPP or ECP mode) parallel port built into it that used a different chip

You're not likely to have that problem unless you have an older Creative (Sound Blaster) audio adapter or sound card.


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#17
June 23, 2012 at 00:49:29
I have taken the PEX1P card out and have sent it back to StarTech, along with an order for a PCI1PM model. I will let you know if this card does the trick.

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#18
June 23, 2012 at 07:07:31
Did you try moving the card to a different PCI-E slot ?

You don't necessarily need to order the card from Startech. Lots of other web sites have it, and even a local place may have it.

"In other words, you probably CAN select a different I/O address if you need to in the Resources settings in Device Manager for the PCI version of the parallel port card."

You may or may not be able to do that. Most often, you can't do that with a PCI card.

The manual for the card, available here.....
http://ca.startech.com/Cards-Adapte...

.....shows that the card has a DIP switch that can be set to PnP which may be the default setting, or to one of the three standard I/O addresses.



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#19
June 24, 2012 at 02:57:20
I didn't try moving the card to a different PCI-E after getting the e-mail from StarTech. Their advice is shown below;

"The three hexadecimal addresses commonly used for onboard parallel ports LPT1,2 and 3 (03BC, 0378, 0278); are absolute addresses, fixed in memory (BIOS). During the boot sequence, the system checks to see if any of these fixed addresses are "occupied" by an onboard parallel port. If neither are occupied, the parallel ports are than addressed by the OS (via the drivers), which in turn, assigns them addresses other than the reserved ones by the system ROM.
It may be possible to bypass this by manually editing the Windows registry (you can find more on this on the internet) and therefore bypassing the driver instructions, but we cannot offer support for such a solution since that may cause unexpected behavior by the OS and the card"

On reading the last paragraph, I decided that replacing the PEX1P card with the PCI1PM, as suggested was the least risky option. I will let you know what happens when the new card is fitted


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#20
June 24, 2012 at 10:09:30
The PCMCIA card reader may NOT be restricted to using only a legacy I/0 address for a parallel port.

It would have done no harm to try moving the card to a different PCI-E slot.
Either doing that would have solved your problem, or not.

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