Articles

Partitioning my main drive

Asus mainboard / P5n-e sli
January 25, 2009 at 01:59:16
Specs: Windows Vista 32bit Home Premium, Intel Core 2 Duo E6750 Conroe 2.66GHz / Crucial Ballistix 2 GB & OCZ 2 GB

I want to partition my main hard drive to be able to dual boot windows 7 and vista. But whenever I go to set up a partition in disk management; the manager says I only have 435 MB available to make into a separate partition, but my hard drive has 222 GB free out of 298 GB total.

If it's of any importance, my process is to go to Disk Management, and then click on the properties of the drive and click "Shrink Volume".


See More: Partitioning my main drive

Report •


#1
January 25, 2009 at 04:43:09

I didn't know you could partition a drive from Disk management.

I would get a live cd of Gparted or Partition Magic from Hirens boot cd.

Before posting try google. Backup. Use anti virus software.


Report •

#2
January 25, 2009 at 06:32:13

Yea, you usually don't boot from the drive you want to partition. Of course you realize this operation is not risk free.

larry


Report •

#3
January 25, 2009 at 08:29:50

>> I only have 435 MB available to make into a separate partition, but my hard drive has 222 GB free out of 298 GB total. <<

Is this free space or unallocated space. There is a difference. Free space is space that has been partitioned and formatted but not used. Unallocated space is space that has been neither partitioned or formatted. You need unallocated space in order to create a partition.

It appears you have 436 Mb of unallocated space and 222 Gb of free space. To convert some of that free space into unallocated space shrinking is what you need to do. So what error message to do get when you try to shrink the existing partition.

It may be that it is only allowing you to reclaim 435 Mbs of the 222 Gbs that is free. This often happens if the drive is badly fragmented. So I would suggest defragmenting the drive and try again.

>> I didn't know you could partition a drive from Disk management. <<

Windows XP has had the ability to partition a drive from day one. Windows Vista has the added ability to shrink a drive which previously would have to be done by a third party utility like Partition Manager.

Stuart


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 25, 2009 at 12:43:44

larryf215: I've never actually dual-booted before, but isnt
that the way to do dual-boot?

StuartS: That may be the case. I'll defrag the drive the and
see if the amount of space I have to actually separate will
change. If not, is there a way to make more unallocated
space without formatting the entire drive?


Report •

#5
January 25, 2009 at 12:52:33

If you cannot shrink the existing partition sufficient to make more unallocated space formating might be the only option. You can try deleting any unwanted stuff which will give you more free space to play around with.

Stuart


Report •

#6
January 25, 2009 at 14:08:14

See, that's the thing StuartS. I have about 222 GB free. I guess maybe I should just separate the 2 SATA drives I have by each operating system. 1 for Vista (data and all files) and the other for Windows 7 (data and all files). Can I dual boot like that? Or would both the OSes have to be on the same drive?

Report •

#7
January 25, 2009 at 14:39:54

You can dual boot with the operating systems on different drives.

The boot files that set the whole thing in motion will be on the first drive and the same files are used by both operating systems.

Stuart


Report •

#8
January 25, 2009 at 15:34:44

I see. So, the files that set up the boot process to the point
of choosing would be on (lets say) C:, and if i chose
Windows 7, it would then boot from (lets say) D:, right?

Report •

#9
January 25, 2009 at 15:43:28

If this PC is also your everyday machine that you use for productivity, you are making a mistake installing a Beta program on it. In any case a little more than 5 months down the road you may find yourself in a situation where you may have to nuke your hard drive. M$ made it very clear that on August 1, 2009, Windows 7 Beta will cease to function altogether.

i_Xp/VistaUser


Report •

#10
January 25, 2009 at 16:36:52

Yes, that is correct. It is the boot.ini file that gives you the choices and there is only one boot.ini on the system which usualy resides on drive C:.

Stuart


Report •

#11
January 25, 2009 at 23:25:12

XP User:

Yeah, I heard about that. But the way I wound up installing (see below) it shouldn't really matter. I'll just need to transfer some files.

Stuart:
Right. So I just installed Windows 7 onto a separate partition I originally meant for files for Windows 7 (I can be a neat freak sometimes). But, I figured. Why not? I'll just install it there. So now drive #2 is split up into Windows 7 and files that Vista uses. And drive #1 is just Vista. Windows 7 did give me a bluescreen (0x00000008) after I finished installing and was logging in. But I'll take care of that later.


Report •


Ask Question