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No Video Input, GFX Card or Other Problem?

January 31, 2010 at 10:57:31
Specs: Windows 7

Hi there, I haven't had any problems since I've installed Win7 on my computer about a month or two ago. However, my problem started a day or two ago when I would get the "Nvidia Driver XXX.XX" stopped responding little tags, and then some crapping out with the pixels. Looked like tearing to me. Anyway, I figure it was a driver problem and I was going to go to the Nvidia website to install the newest drivers when my computer just gets a BSOD and dies. Also, this started happening after I had done a Windows Update, sadly I don't recall what was included in the update.

Fast forward to now, I can turn on my computer and even get it to start up windows (I hear the chime of Windows loading/starting) but I have no signal coming from my DVI cord. I've checked the connection, replugged it in etc, and I've also taken out and reinserted my card in all of my pci slots for nothing. Now, everything seems to work fine, even the fan on the Video card is working, just no signal into my monitor. I know the monitor isn't the problem since I can use it with other things and it works fine.

This seems to be the problem thus far and I would appreciate any nuggets of info to possibly help me out. Also some other info to help out:

500 Watt PSU, there was some dust in there and I had recently cleaned the GFX Card's Fan, I had these driver problems back when I was in the RC stage of Win7 as well. Also, I think my computer overheats sometimes as it will randomly turn off and when I restart my BIOS shows me heats of like 99C/199F (?, something like that). I feel like my card finally kicked the bucket but something about it won't let me shake the feeling that maybe in the Update process the video drivers were deleted/corrupted and now can't even detect a Monitor. Sorry, but I don't have another monitor to test with right now either unless you can outfit a Macbook Pro to be a monitor!

Thanks a lot for anything!


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#1
January 31, 2010 at 11:16:36

The name of your graphic card? 99c, is this cpu or gpu temp? Do u have onboard video?Better mention your system specs. Do u see post screen? If u have access to another system test your gfx card.

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#2
January 31, 2010 at 12:38:40

Your geforce 7800 gtx video card ....

I'm assuming you've installed only one.

Any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements.

"A minimum 400W system power supply (with 12V current rating of 26A or more) "
http://www.bfgtech.com/3dfuzion/car...

So 500 watts capacity is more than enough, but what brand and model is it? Some brands are known to be more likely to malfunction, and their are lots of "el-cheapo" PSs out there that are not good.

"....have no signal coming from my DVI cord."
" know the monitor isn't the problem since I can use it with other things and it works fine."

You have no signal from the video card.

"I would get the "Nvidia Driver XXX.XX" stopped responding little tags, and then some crapping out with the pixels."

Drivers extremely rarely cause that video symptom.

NOTE that some recent and failly recent mboards DO NOT disable the onboard video, if your mboard has that, when you install a video card in a slot, AND the video card displays no video by default. You have to connect a monitor to the onboard video, and set the setting Primary video or Intialize video first or similar setting to PCI-E or similar, THEN the video will work on the card. However, if you haven't messed with bios settings or loaded bios defaults or cleared the cmos or removed the mboard cmos battery, that would not apply to your case.

Assuming the PS is okay.....

ALWAYS - unplug the PS/case or switch off the AC to the case whenever you fiddle with any connection or component or card inside the case!
An ATX mboard is always powered in some places when the PS is receiving live AC power.

Power off the monitor, disconnect it's video cable
Open up your case.
Remove the video card.
Wipe off the contacts on the bottom of the card with at least a tissue or cloth. If you use any water or alcohol or whatever, do not get it onto anything but the contacts - do not spray it.
Install the card. Make sure it's all the way down in it's slot. Secure it with it's screw. If there is a latch at the inside of the slot you can lock it down with, do that.

If there is a socket for a power connector on the card, it MUST be connected to wiring from the PS. You probably will get no video if that's not plugged in. .

There is a small power socket other than the main 24 "pin one on the mboard that must have wiring plugged into it from the PS - make sure that's plugged it, or you probably will get no video.

While you're in there, if the cpu fan/heatsink has mung (dust, lint, etc.) on it, clean it off, but DO NOT use a vaccuum cleaner to do that (they produce a tremendous amount of static electricity when running, and anything connected to them can discharge that to your components) - use canned air, or an air nozzle if you have access to an air compressor, or an artist's brush that can be used in small spaces, etc. It may be difficult to clean the top of the heatsink under the cpu fan - the most likely place to have mung on it - and the bottom side of the cpu fan blades unless you remove the fan. If you have a case fan, clean that too if it needs it.

"....shows me heats of like 99C/199F (?..."

I've never seen a bios that can show you the current video card chipset temp readings, so that's probably the cpu temp. That's WAY TOO HIGH !

While you're in there, if the cpu fan/heatsink has mung (dust, lint, etc.) on it, clean it off, but DO NOT use a vaccuum cleaner to do that (they produce a tremendous amount of static electricity when running, and anything connected to them can discharge that to your components) - use canned air, or an air nozzle if you have access to an air compressor, or an artist's brush that can be used in small spaces, etc. It may be difficult to clean the top of the heatsink under the cpu fan - the most likely place to have mung on it - and the bottom side of the cpu fan blades unless you remove the fan. If you have a case fan, clean that too if it needs it.

With the cover still off, restore the AC power, start the computer and make sure the cpu fan spins - if it doesn't spin, if you're sure the power supply is working okay, don't use the computer until you have replaced it !!
If it spins too slowly, and/or if it makes rattling or screeching noises, most likely to be noticed when the computer has cooled to room temp, has not been used for a while, and then is started up, the cpu fan's bearings are failing - the cpu is likely to overheat as a result of that if it can no longer spin it's full speed - replace it as soon as you can.

Another thing that can cause overheating inside the case is if the power supply fan no longer spins - in that case the System temp or similar will get high in the bios readings, and that will affect the cpu temp somewhat - make sure the PS fan does spin!

Connect the monitor whgen it's powered off, when the computer is not running.
Try booting normally.

If you still get no video.....

Do you mean no video at all, or you have video BEFORE Windows is supposed to load while booting, then no video ??

No video at all can't be anything but a hardware problem. If your mboard has onboard video, remove the AC to the case, remove the video card, connect the moniitor to a onboard video port, restore AC power, try booting normally.
........

If you have video BEFORE Windows is supposed to load...

"the "Nvidia Driver XXX.XX" stopped responding "

Your specific drivers for the video card in Windows MAY be corrupted.


Remove any bootable disks you have in drives, or bootable flash drives or bootable external drives data/power cable.

Press F8 repeatedly while booting starting very early in the boot - when the boot choices list appears
, choose Safe mode with networking
If that gets you to the desktop (the video display will be cruder) then your video card may be fine.

Control Panel - Programs and Features

Un-install the 'drivers" for the NVidia video.

(If you get a message you can't do that....

Restart the computer
Press F8 repeatedly while booting starting very early in the boot - when the boot choices list appears
, choose Enable Low Resolution Video

Control Panel - Programs and Features

Un-install the 'drivers" for the NVidia video.)

Try booting normally. The video should work, but it may be cruder.
DO NOT install drivers while booting if Windows wants you to point to drivers while booting.

Get and install the proper Nvidia drivers. If this is a generic system, load them from the CD that came with the mboard.
Or - get the proper drivers from the web.

Sometimes the video drivers on the CD have bugs, but if they did, you would have symptoms from the very beggining of using your computer after they were loaded.



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#3
January 31, 2010 at 13:06:42

To clear some things up, it is NO video AT ALL. Like no signal is being read by the monitor.

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#4
January 31, 2010 at 13:17:22

I suspect the card is gone. And u didn't answer my questions in response #1.

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#5
January 31, 2010 at 14:18:46

it's a Geforce 7800 GTX the 99c was the CPU temp i believe. No I don't have any other way to test the GFX card. Also, I don't see anything. There is just no signal.

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#6
January 31, 2010 at 14:38:32

U didn't answer all questions "do u have onboard video" if yes try to connect monitor via onboard video.

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#7
February 1, 2010 at 09:35:55

i don't have onboard video, but I went out and got a GT 220 Geforce card and popped it in. Now I can get through my BIOS screens, but when windows actually starts up, I lose input. I can still hear the sounds though.

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#8
February 1, 2010 at 10:49:31

So - sounds like the other card was fried.

"GT 220 Geforce "
Minimum PS capacity 350 watts - you're okay there.

Did you unplug the case/PS, or switch off the power to the case, BEFORE you plugged in the card ??

If there is a socket for a power connector on the card, it MUST be connected to wiring from the PS. You probably will get no video if that's not plugged in, at least part of the time.

If that's not plugged in, remove or switch off the AC power to the case BEFORE you plug it in. .
.........

Go into the bios and set the setting Primary video or Intialize video first or similar setting to PCI-E or similar, if it's not already set to that, save settings.

You probably need to un-install the NVidia drivers you installed previously.

Remove any bootable disks you have in drives, or bootable flash drives or bootable external drives data/power cable.
Boot the computer
Press F8 repeatedly while booting starting very early in the boot - when the boot choices list appears
, choose Enable Low Resolution Video

Control Panel - Programs and Features

Un-install the 'drivers" for the NVidia video.

Boot normally.

You should have vodeo but it will be basic.

Install the NVidia drivers for the card.
.........

If you have no video when Windows is supposed to load after you load the NVidia drivers, sometimes that happens if the video drivers are not detecting your monitor correctly.....

Press F8 repeatedly while booting starting very early in the boot - when the boot choices list appears
, choose Enable Low Resolution Video

RIGHT click on a blank area of the main desktop screen.
Choose Display Settings.
Advanced Settings
Monitor
Properties
Continue
Driver
Update Driver
Browse my computer...
Let me pick from a list....
Choose Generic PNP monitor
OR - much better - click on Have Disk and load the specific drivers for your monitor model - they're on the CD that came with the monitor, or download them from the web.
Windows is looking for a *.inf file.

The changes to those settings may not be fully in effect until you have clicked on whatever isat the bottom of the windows to continue or save changes, and after you have clicked on OK on the Display settings screen.

Reboot normally.

.


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