Solved New SSD, best course of action

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February 16, 2014 at 16:56:15
Specs: Windows 8.1 64 Bit, AMD FX-8350 8 Core @ 4.0 GHz w/ 2x4 DDR3-1600
Hey Everyone,

Just bought a new solid state (Samsung EVO 840 500GB), it is the same size as my current hard drive. I was just wondering, what do you think would be my best option at this point? I want to make the SSD my main drive for OS and heavily used programs. I would prefer not having to reinstall EVERYTHING, although I do have my Windows 8.1 Installation disc so this shouldn't be a problem. The solid state came with some software designed to transfer files, although I don't know if this would work for things like an OS. Any suggestions?

Oh, and I do have an external 2TB hard drive in case that would be helpful.

Thanks.


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✔ Best Answer
February 19, 2014 at 14:25:02
By inactive I meant while in Task Manager it was saying the old drive (drive 1) was being read and written to, whereas drive 0 -- the solid state -- was inactive.

I got the drive to clone properly. First, Windows was treating the drive like it had no storage space left, as it was unpartitioned. I just created a partition (NTFS) on the drive then ran cloning, and it started working (after I booted from the SSD through BIOS).

A question though, on both drives there is a small partition (called Data on the SSD, and System Reserved on the old HDD). Are these just paging files or something? The one on the solid state is 100 MB, whereas the partition on the old drive is 350 MB. Both are only partially used. I did notice that the cloning drive said it would not copy things like paging files or hibernation files. Do you guys think that it would be OK to delete the partition on the old drive? Considering it isn't being used, and Windows booted fine when I loaded it without the old drive.



#1
February 16, 2014 at 18:13:29
Typically, the advice is usually to clone your present drive to the new one (your SSD).

Most drives SSD or otherwise will often come with cut down version of one of the major cloning/imaging software players. Some used to use Ghost, some Acronis, some possibly Easus etc.; they all will do much the same... Presumably there is a basic how to do it (clone) included with the software?

So once you're happy your data is safe... clone the old to the new and switch the drives around.

Then switch them around

Presumably your system is desktop not a laptop (going by your info inyou tag lines). Just be sure to remove power completely - mains cord removed... - before taking taking the current drive out etc... If it was a laptop one would also remove the battery.

I would certainly ensure that all my data/personal fles are saved safely off the presnt drive - before cloning and drive swapping... Not likely thing may go awry and affect those precious/i don't want to lose files... But safety first is a good way to go...


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#2
February 16, 2014 at 18:18:08
Alright, so transferring the OS won't be a problem? Great!

Yeah, you're right, it's a PC.

I actually plan on still using the old drive for things like movies and music, my computer has 4 drive bays. Should I just clone the drive, then wipe the old one?


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#3
February 16, 2014 at 18:26:51
Oh, another thing, do you think all my programs will still work properly, considering that they will now be on D: instead of C:? Is there a way to manually switch the drive names so they work properly?

Or will the cloning software do this for me?

The name of the program that came with the drive is Samsung Magician 4.0


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Related Solutions

#4
February 16, 2014 at 20:37:28
Understand that whatever disk is running windows on it will be considered as C drive by Windows so there will not be any problem.
Once the drive is cloned, shut down and manually switch the drives. Then boot directly into your BIOS set up and make just the SSD drive bootable and put it into the boot order with the conventional drives not bootable. Save and Exit BIOS and boot to Windows. If all boots correctly and your programs and files are in good order, you can the wipe the original drive for storage. I also recommend that you use the Windows back up to save a back up of the SSD drive and a Disk Image to one of your conventional hard drives (or one to each) for protection. Then read up online on optimizing your SSD drive like turning off indexing and paging files (virtual memory) for the SSD drive, but you can have them (especially the paging file) on the conventional drive(s). You also probably will want to move your personal files from the SSD drive onto your conventional storage hard drive,

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
February 17, 2014 at 05:16:38
Might also be a good idea to change the cabling to the drives by connecting the SSD to SATA port #1. Verify the boot order in the BIOS is set to boot to the SSD first.

You can name the hard drive in order to identify them better, seeing as both are 500GB.


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#6
February 18, 2014 at 14:02:23
Alright guys, I cloned the drive, although I'm not sure if it worked or not. I booted off of the SSD from BIOS, and it loaded windows fine. But when I open Task Manager, it shows the SSD as Disk 0 and the old HDD as Disk 1, and it is saying the solid state is inactive for some reason. I'm about to try booting the computer with the HDD disconnected, I'll post back with the results.

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#7
February 18, 2014 at 20:25:08
Boot into BIOS set up and make sure that the SSD is the only drive (other than optical drive) that is bootable and is second in boot order after optical drive.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
February 19, 2014 at 03:37:40
For reasons I can't recall just now, physical hard drives are numbered starting with zero. Thus the first drive is 0, the second 1, the third 2,, and on on. Partitions start at 1. If you look at the boot.ini for windows OS and observe the ARC path/statement you will see it in use...

So your SSD is correctly numbered. But why it shows as inactive - no idea. Other than it may be the way they operate; there being no moving parts etc.and so nothing to indicate they're alive" as it were...?

Possibly others may be able to explain the apparent inactive message, or is it just the way SSD work and show as such? Lots yet to learn about them I suspect..

edited to correct a couple mis-spelinges/mystaykes...

message edited by trvlr


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#9
February 19, 2014 at 04:17:33
'SSD inactive'??

Original OS still present on the old HDD?

(Sounds like it' may still be booting from the original drive. Even though you set the BIOS priority for the SSD, if it's not recognized, the system will search out the next available OS.)

As Fingers recommended; unhitch the old HDD, so only the SSD is present.
What happens now?


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#10
February 19, 2014 at 14:25:02
✔ Best Answer
By inactive I meant while in Task Manager it was saying the old drive (drive 1) was being read and written to, whereas drive 0 -- the solid state -- was inactive.

I got the drive to clone properly. First, Windows was treating the drive like it had no storage space left, as it was unpartitioned. I just created a partition (NTFS) on the drive then ran cloning, and it started working (after I booted from the SSD through BIOS).

A question though, on both drives there is a small partition (called Data on the SSD, and System Reserved on the old HDD). Are these just paging files or something? The one on the solid state is 100 MB, whereas the partition on the old drive is 350 MB. Both are only partially used. I did notice that the cloning drive said it would not copy things like paging files or hibernation files. Do you guys think that it would be OK to delete the partition on the old drive? Considering it isn't being used, and Windows booted fine when I loaded it without the old drive.


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