Solved New PC - Everything crashes randomly.

Amd Athlon ii x4 640 3 ghz processor - q...
May 25, 2013 at 10:40:53
Specs: Windows 8 (64-Bit), 8GB
Okay, so I just built my first PC with the following specs
- AMD Athlon II X4 640 Processor
- 2 x 4GB RAM
- Biostar A780L3C Motherboard
- Seagate 500GM Barracude HDD
- Saphire HD 7750 Graphics Card
- Corsair PSU CX430 Builder Series 430W
- Komputerbay 8GB (2 X 4GB) DDR3 DIMM RAM

With completely default BIOS settings, I experience small but extremely annoying crashes in almost everything. In google chrome, I experience the 'Aw Snap' page multiple times, Internet explorer I get 'Internet explorer has stopped working', Firefox crashes too, also Minecraft crashes to desktop randomly every 5-10 minutes, and it also happens with GTA IV. I can't load Feed the Beast. Everything, even the plugin (Adblock) That I have for Google Chrome, crashes all the time.Even trying to load this page was a problem. My PC often also crashes with the blue screen, often with different errors that I can't remember.
Is there anything in my BIOS I can update, or is it something to do with my hardware?
I need help in preventing these crashes, and so would be very appreciated.


See More: New PC - Everything crashes randomly.

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✔ Best Answer
May 25, 2013 at 15:49:59
I had to use Bluescreenview myself yesterday. I've got a new build that was regularly BSODing. Bluescreenview identified a dodgy driver that I was able to replace/update and it seems to have stopped the errors.

Having looked up Komputerbay RAM however, it would seem that some users have experienced issues with it, so I would run memtest to rule out any hardware issues as well.



#1
May 25, 2013 at 11:04:42
1st of all, "completely default BIOS settings" isn't necessarily the best way to go. You should manually configure the BIOS to best suite your hardware configuration.

2nd, did you test the RAM with memtest86 before installing the OS & programs?

3rd, have you checked your CPU temp in the BIOS to make sure it isn't running too hot?

"My PC often also crashes with the blue screen, often with different errors that I can't remember"

You're going to have to remember them because they're the clue as to whether you have a software or hardware problem. My guess is the RAM.


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#2
May 25, 2013 at 12:45:59
Give the error number of the BSOD's, particularly the first group of figures. If a file is mentioned then give us that too.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#3
May 25, 2013 at 13:45:02
Try downloading "Bluescreenview" and running it. It checks through your memory dumps (generated by each blue screen error) and displays the driver/file causing the BSOD.

Otherwise, try to write down the BSOD error code as this can help us work out what's causing the problem.

It could well be a memory problem or bad drivers. What speed is the RAM, as that motherboard supposedly only supports DDR3 up to 1600MHz according to the Biostar website.


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Related Solutions

#4
May 25, 2013 at 14:16:57
Borealis, thanks a million on the tip about bluescreenview! It sure will come in helpful!

Some HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions 7 Golds


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#5
May 25, 2013 at 15:49:59
✔ Best Answer
I had to use Bluescreenview myself yesterday. I've got a new build that was regularly BSODing. Bluescreenview identified a dodgy driver that I was able to replace/update and it seems to have stopped the errors.

Having looked up Komputerbay RAM however, it would seem that some users have experienced issues with it, so I would run memtest to rule out any hardware issues as well.


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#6
May 25, 2013 at 16:34:13
Yes, I used to use Windows dump analysis on my XP - automated with batch files as a sequence. Not bad, but on my Win 8 I have Bluescreenview available instead - neat and easy to use, updated by just replacing the downloaded stand-alone file. Haven't had to use it in anger yet but there's always a first time LOL.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
May 25, 2013 at 20:55:02
In addition to above, did you download all of your drivers directly from component mfg's websites? Did you make sure they are for your version of Windows?

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
May 26, 2013 at 03:59:28
My apologies, I had entered my first motherboard as I decided to replace it. The motherboard at the moment is a Gigabyte GA-78LMT-USB3 Socket AM3+.

I also ran memtest, and there were no errors. I have had two BSOD's since my post, one of the errors being 'IQRL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL' and the other 'BAD_POOL_HEADER'.

I believe I had installed all of my drivers, as the disk never worked in windows 8 even using compatibility mode. Somehow, I do think my ram is the problem, but I'm no genius with what causes such problems with computers. I'll check my drivers again, and I will try to use bluescreenview. I'll also add a screen capture of HWMonitor for you.


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#9
May 26, 2013 at 04:01:57
HWMonitor View
Here's the screen capture.

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#10
May 26, 2013 at 04:49:19
Thanks for the screen capture. Looking at your voltages, the +12V is way off. The tolerance for the 12V supply is +/- 5% - i.e. +/- 0.6V so it should be fluctuating between 11.4V and 12.6V

If HWmonitor is correct and the PSU is only supplying 7-8V, then that could well cause instabilities such as BSODs and crashes.

Corsair are a good, reliable brand for power supplies, but it looks like you may have a faulty one.

Unfortunately this doesn't rule out the possibility of a RAM problem as well as those BSOD errors could well be memory related.


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#11
May 26, 2013 at 04:55:35
If the voltage readings are accurate that may be at the root cause of your problems.
Voltages should be within 10% of target but yours are all about 30% under spec.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#12
May 26, 2013 at 05:38:26
I had the same problem before too, before I changed the power supply AND my motherboard. I went from the Biostar Motherboard and a CIT 400W PSU, to my current PSU and Motherboard. I thought it may have solved the problem. Could there be something affecting the power supply? If I had the same problem before with a CIT 400W PSU and the Biostar Motherboard (Crap, I know) then could it be something else?

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#13
May 26, 2013 at 05:43:20
For a moment, if you assume that the supply voltages are not reading correct, the VCore appears to be very low (though I do not know AMD CPU's well) and the CPU core temperatures are unusually low. This supports the VCore being lower than it should be. Under a low VCore, the CPU would appear to work normally but become unstable under load which is what it appears to be happening. This goes back to the fact that using the BIOS defaults is not the beast choice and should be corrected before you go crazy looking at faulty components. PLEASE get some advice on the proper BIOS settings for your AMD set up from someone who knows their settings well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#14
May 26, 2013 at 08:29:05
It just so happens that my current PC (soon to be rebuilt) is running an Athlon II x4 640 on stock settings, so I can give you an idea of what the Vcore voltage ought to be.

According to AMD, the maximum safe Vcore is 1.4V

My own Vcore varies from 0.96 to 1.34V, depending on CPU throttling - it runs slower if it's too hot or not doing anything.

None of the available temperature monitors are that good for AMD, it's a known problem. You need to look at "TMPIN2 (this is the same as the CPU temp according to my BIOS hardware monitor)

If the Vcore is too low, then Fingers is right on the money as the system will be unstable and crash because the CPU isn't getting enough power. I must emphasise that I am no expert on manually setting voltages etc. This is just what my machine is running on at the moment. If it turns out that your BIOS settings aren't right, then you need to get some advice from someone who knows what they're meant to be.


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#15
May 26, 2013 at 10:31:30
As I am completely new at these kind of problems, I couldn't really come close to a solution. However if the problem persists with a completely different set of hardware for my PSU and Motherboard, it's easy to assume that it must be something else.

Also, I actually received a small electric shock this morning after touching my case. I don't know if perhaps some of my hardware is faulty and causing this, or whether this is even related to the subject at all. Just thought I'd mention it.

I understand that I perhaps need to adjust my BIOS settings, as I don't know what the settings exactly 'do', and need some advice. Any idea where I could find some?


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#16
May 26, 2013 at 10:57:23
I've got an old machine I get the occaisional static shock off, it sometimes depends on the weather and humidity.

I'm just downloading your motherboard manual from the Gigabyte site. I'll have a look and see if the BIOS is like mine. If it is, I might be able to help you set it to the settings as mine.


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#17
May 26, 2013 at 12:17:16
Thanks. :) All is appreciated.

I've had quite a few BSOD's now. Here are the errors that came up.

IQRL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL
BAD_POOL_HEADER
BAD_POOL_HEADER
0xa0000001
BAD_POOL_HEADER


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#18
May 26, 2013 at 13:55:29
OK, I've looked at the mainboard manual and the BIOS is identical to a new build I just made for my family, so I've got a good idea of where to look.

Remeber, if in doubt you can always exit the BIOS without saving changes if you're unsure what you're doing.

Once you're in the BIOS, you want to select the option labelled "MB Intelligent Tweaker (M.I.T)" and press Enter.

You should get a screen with a whole list of settings, with system voltage control at the bottom. Even if everything is set to "Auto" and they're greyed out, you should still be able to see values for "Normal CPU Vcore" and "Normal Vcore NB"

CPU Vcore is the one we're interested in. Write that voltage down and then exit the BIOS by pressing Escape until you get a message saying something like "Exit without saving changes?" It may ask for a Y/N answer, so press Y then Enter to confirm you want to exit WITHOUT saving changes.

If you could then let us know what the Vcore value is, we might be able to shed some light on your problem.

Apologies if you already know how to navigate the BIOS, I just want to make sure!


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#19
May 26, 2013 at 14:28:03
Honestly, I suck at navigating through the BIOS, lol. Thanks so much, it really helps. I looked at the Voltages as you said, and this came up.

Normal CPU Vcore 1.2750V
Normal CPU Vcore NB 1.1500V


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#20
May 26, 2013 at 15:24:57
I also just got another BSOD. This time the error was 'PFN_LIST_CORRUPT'

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#21
May 26, 2013 at 15:32:59
I realise it is a new build but take out the RAM, clean the edge connectors with a pencil eraser then pop the sticks in and out a few times to clear any oxide off the sockets. A mixed bag of different BSOD's could be due to the presence of a very thin film of oxide.

While you are at it do the same with any SATA HD power and signal connectors.

Having said that I agree that the voltages look a bit odd.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#22
May 26, 2013 at 15:44:39
OK, I'll need to look it up, but I think that your voltages may be set too low.

I know that my x4 640 automatically set itself to about 1.35 and is absolutely fine at that voltage.

I'll go into my BIOS tomorrow and check what my own CPU Vcore and CPU Vcore NB are as a reference. If we need to manually adjust your Vcore settings, we'll do it gradually in very small steps so as not to risk any damage.

I'm still slightly concerned about your power supply, but it could be that because the CPU is under-powered it's causing false readings.

Derek has a good point here. Also try running with just 1 stick of RAM. If it's bad RAM, it'll stop BSODing straight away.


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#23
May 26, 2013 at 16:16:43
Thanks, step-by-step sounds fine.

I'll do what Derek has suggested, I'll clean the edges and I will try with both RAM sticks. Then, I will try with each stick and see how things work.

Thanks again.


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#24
May 26, 2013 at 16:19:29
I also just got another BSOD, just to let you know.

This time the error was 'MEMORY_MANAGEMENT'


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#25
May 26, 2013 at 18:10:04
It sounds like a plan. The shock from the computer case, does concern me though. Look carefully (computer unplugged) where all wires run through or along metal edges in the case, under the motherboard (not a good idea), or possibly between components for wires that may be pinched or insulation that may have rubbed off, causing power to the case which should be ground only. Look also to be sure that you have stand offs and screws at all screw holes in the motherboard, and no stand offs anywhere else. Computer components cannot generate static (though if in a carpeted room, you can), so it is worth a good careful look to be sure.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#26
May 26, 2013 at 18:20:28
I'll take a good look inside my case. My computer is in a carpeted room, but I must mention that I have had a couple of shocks in the past from a laptop and an iPhone.

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#27
May 26, 2013 at 18:58:16
Sounds crazy but if you put your hand on the floor before working on it that discharges you.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#28
May 27, 2013 at 01:32:21
Okay. I have cleaned the RAM with an eraser, nothing has changed however I have had yet another BSOD with with a different error.

The error: 'PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONEPAGED_AREA'

I have now tried it out without my graphics card, and only one stick of RAM. There are barely any crashes however I have still had one or two 'Aw snap!' pages on GC. MC launcher has crashed once.

After putting the components back in, I've had another two BSOD's.

The error: 'KERNEL_SECURITY_CHECK_FAILURE'
I had this error twice.

Here's a list showing all of the errors from BSOD's since I posted the problem.

'IQRL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL'
'BAD_POOL_HEADER'
'BAD_POOL_HEADER'
'0xa0000001'
'BAD_POOL_HEADER'
'PFN_LIST_CORRUPT'
'MEMORY_MANAGEMENT'
'PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONEPAGED_AREA'
'KERNEL_SECURITY_CHECK_FAILURE'
'KERNEL_SECURITY_CHECK_FAILURE'

If the problem is my RAM, which for some reason I suspect that it is, what kind would you recommend that I purchase?


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#29
May 27, 2013 at 05:28:28
go to crucial.com and have their checker see which Ram you need.

Some HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions 7 Golds


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#30
May 27, 2013 at 08:29:18
If you need new RAM, then Crucial is very good. Like XpUser suggests, you can use their memory finder to work out what will work with your system. They also have a very good warranty system as I've had to return RAM to them before.

I've had a chance to look at my own BIOS and the CPU Vcore is definitely 1.325V but I would expect the system to run at 1.275V as it's only undervolting it by 0.05V.

Given that the BSODs stopped when you took out the other components and reappeared when you put them back in, I'd reckon that your RAM is faulty.

Bad RAM can cause all kinds of crazy computer behaviour, including crashes, BSODs, random reboots etc. RAM faults are also the most comman hardware fault in my opinion as memory can be very unstable.


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#31
May 27, 2013 at 09:43:10
So, would it be reasonable getting this RAM?

8GB Kit (4GBx2), 240-pin DIMM, DDR3 PC3-12800 memory module

http://www.crucial.com/uk/store/mpa...

Also, I just got yet ANOTHER BSOD.

Error: 'REFERENCE_BY_POINTER'


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#32
May 27, 2013 at 12:13:14
That RAM would be absolutely fine for your system. As I said, Crucial is pretty reliable. If it's a memory fault, new RAM will stop the BSODs.

From doing a quick search, there have been some interesting stories about some Komputerbay RAM causing problems.

Also, have you tried running Bluescreenview yet?

http://www.nirsoft.net/utils/blue_s...

Personally, I think it's highly likely your RAM is faulty but it would be worth checking to see what drivers are causing the BSODs.


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#33
May 27, 2013 at 13:57:48
Do I just leave it open until it crashes?

Thanks for the advice.


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#34
May 27, 2013 at 14:15:22
Ventilation can be poor with the sides off if that's what you mean. Best to at least put case into position temporarily then see if you can produce any more failures.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#35
May 27, 2013 at 15:07:18
Haha, sorry. I meant do I leave bluescreenview open, until I get a BSOD. Does it just dump the files automatically?

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#36
May 27, 2013 at 16:12:48
Ooops.

Reboot after the BSOD then run Bluescreenview - the dump files should still be there if Windows produced them (Bluescreenview only helps you to view them conveniently).

Windows 8 should create the dump files by default, although it would be as well to check the settings - see below:
http://www.thewindowsclub.com/autom...
[Best avoid the registry tweak on there]

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#37
May 27, 2013 at 16:49:12
Bear in mind that the dump files could be misleading if this is a RAM issue because they will only show where the system was when the RAM failed. The mixed bag of BSOD's leads me to suspect RAM. Did you try with one of the sticks at a time, with everything else put back?

If the dump files always point to the same driver then that is a different matter.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#38
May 29, 2013 at 04:09:26
I've installed the RAM that I mentioned previously, and I've had not a single crash in any applications. It seems to have worked, however I've only been running my computer for ten minutes. I'll get back to you soon with the outcome.

Great appreciation for all of your help. Thanks!


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#39
May 29, 2013 at 16:06:13
Great to hear, If you do not get any more crashes for two or more days, please select a best answer, that will mark it Solved.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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