Solved Need to understand card differences GeForce 6,7 ,8 ,9

May 7, 2012 at 08:26:12
Specs: Windows 7, AMD Athlon 64 3200+ 2Ghz 1MB - RAM 2GB PC2700
My PC has a K8Nf6G-VSTA board w Ge Force 6 and need a PCIe card with DVI. How do I understand all the Nvidia Ge Force Levels to make an informed selection?

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#1
May 7, 2012 at 09:36:37
✔ Best Answer
Is there are specific purpose of the upgrade other than the need for DVI? Gaming for example?

"Need to understand card differences GeForce 6,7 ,8 ,9"

nVidia doesn't use that naming convention anymore, but the higher the number, the newer the generation. The 2nd number (6200, 6600, 6800) is the performance level. Generally, the higher the 2nd number, the better the performance, but not always. The trailing letters (XT, GS, GT, etc) further help to nail down the performance. And the higher the performance, the higher the power requirements, so if a gaming card is what you're after, make sure your power supply can handle it.

But that's just the tip of the iceburg - there are other specs that should be compared - GPU, GPU clock speed, shaders/shader model, memory type, memory speed, memory bandwidth, etc, etc. There are also different PCIe generations - 1.0, 1.x, 2.0, 2.1, 3.0.

Your board is old & probably has a 1st generation PCIe X16 slot. That means you should stick to PCIe 2.0 cards or older.

Motherboard info: http://www.asrock.com/mb/overview.a...

Here's a chart that should help: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...

Here's the entire article: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...

Just curious, do you not like AMD/ATI video cards?


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#2
May 7, 2012 at 09:40:32
This may help (or confuse) as well: http://www.techpowerup.com/gpudb/

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#3
May 7, 2012 at 09:53:48
In addition to the very informative information above I would add that integrated GPUs (part or the motherboard or CPU) generally can't be compared to their add in PCIe counterparts.

There are many reasons for this, but suffice to say an add in card in the same series as an integrated GPU will generally out perform the integrated version.


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#4
May 7, 2012 at 12:28:07
I appreciate the response, it answers my questions well.

I have been building my own desktop since the 90s, tend to upgrade components when the need arises, so I keep them for a long time in PC years. Certainly cheaper but creates a problem in deciphering model to model variations over the years.

I have a predisposition to those brands and vendors that I have good experience with so stick to NVIDIA technology for graphics cards AMD for CPUs etc. I don't do gaming which seems to be te driving force for video cards. I do use Solidworks and Corel Graphics suite which is driving my changes to the CPU and Video card now.


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#5
May 7, 2012 at 14:13:25
In addition to the very informative information above I would add that integrated GPUs (part or the motherboard or CPU) generally can't be compared to their add in PCIe counterparts.
Yes this is true but intergrated are coming fast
Integrated: 6620G, 6550D
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...

GT, GTS, GTX
Not all GT are good
All GTS and GTX are good.

I have a predisposition to those brands and vendors that I have good experience with so stick to NVIDIA technology for graphics cards AMD for CPUs etc.
Do u know AMD are nowhere near INTEL when it comes to CPUs?

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.


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