Solved Need refresher on BIOS settings

Self build / N/A
October 1, 2016 at 08:49:17
Specs: Vista Ultimate, SP2, 3.0Ghz/2Ghz
I think my CMOS battery needs to be replaced. I think I remember what the FSB and memory settings were. The memory is DDR266. I think I set the FSB to 133 and the memory to 266. Does that sound right? It's possible that the battery doesn't need to be replaced since I pulled the power plug recently when there was a thunderstorm. The computer was not on at the time but the motherboard maintains a 5V standby voltage. Could I have effected the CMOS by pulling the plug even though the computer was not on?

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✔ Best Answer
October 3, 2016 at 10:31:09
"With the ratio at 100/133 isn't the processor running slower than the memory? Is there a good reference on the web where I can learn about this. I find it very confusing."

The netburst architecture used in the P4 is inefficient. Up until the P4 was released, the recommended FSB:DRAM frequency ratio for best performance was 1:1. It was found that because of the deficiencies of netburst, P4 systems performed better if the RAM frequency is clocked one step faster than the CPU frequency. In other words: 100/133 (400FSB/266DDR), 133/166 (533FSB/333DDR), 200/266 (800FSB/533DDR), 266/333 (1066FSB/667DDR).

http://www.pcper.com/news/Editorial...

http://www.geek.com/chips/intel-to-...

QDR = Quad Data Rate also know as "quad pumping". It allows more data to be carried at the same clock speed. For example: if you drive a car at 50MPH & you're the only person in the car, you're going 50MPH. If you pick up 3 friends & drive at 50MPH, you're not going 200MPH, you're still going 50MPH but you're caryying 4x as many people. So in a way, DDR & QDR speeds are just marketing ploys. It's generally best to refer to actual frequencies rather than these bogus ratings.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quad_...

message edited by riider



#1
October 1, 2016 at 10:06:56
"Could I have effected the CMOS by pulling the plug even though the computer was not on?"

The standby voltage maintains the CMOS settings, the battery is a backup in case the power is cut. If the battery is bad & you unplugged the power cord, the BIOS settings will clear & reset to the defaults.

It's tough to recommend settings when we have no idea which motherboard, CPU, or RAM you have. DDR266 RAM runs at 133MHz frequency. Some BIOS list it as 266, others as 133. FSB speed depends on CPU type & can also be listed differently in the BIOS. 133MHz is the true FSB frequency, 266MHz the DDR FSB, 533MHz QDR FSB.

Please list your system specs.


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#2
October 1, 2016 at 12:09:08
This is regarding an older computer I have. The motherboard is Soyo Fire Dragon P4I, memory is Crucial DDR 266 and processor is Intel pentium 4 at 1.5 GHz. FSB of Mobo is 400 MHz. The FSB frequency can be adjusted from 100 to 255. So, if I have this right, I can set the bus to 133 and the ram to 266? That would be 133x4 or 532 for the bus and 266x2 or 532 for the RAM. Sound right?

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#3
October 1, 2016 at 12:26:44
"Sound right?"

No. A P4 uses QDR so 400MHz FSB is actually 100MHz frequency.

"The FSB frequency can be adjusted from 100 to 255"

It should be set to 100MHz.

"memory is Crucial DDR 266"

The setting will be either 133MHz or 266MHz.

100/133 = 3/4 which is the proper FSB/DRAM frequency ratio for a 400MHz FSB P4.


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Related Solutions

#4
October 2, 2016 at 09:05:48
I have to look up the specs on the CPU. I think it might have a faster FSB than the motherboard, in which case I can go higher than 100Mhz. What is QDR?

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#5
October 2, 2016 at 09:40:22
I neglected to mention before that when I pulled the computer's power plug, I pulled out from the surge suppressor and not from the wall. Most times I unplug everything from the wall where the surge suppressor is connected. I never lost any BIOS settings before. That leads me to believe the battery has gone bad. If the battery is good, it shouldn't matter where you unplug the power cord from, assuming of course, that the computer is turned off. I'll find out for sure the next time I turn on the computer; if it hasn't retained the date and time that I corrected, then I need a new battery.

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#6
October 2, 2016 at 17:38:50
I do need a new CMOS battery. I adjusted the processor and memory speeds as you suggested. I have a question though. With the ratio at 100/133 isn't the processor running slower than the memory? Is there a good reference on the web where I can learn about this. I find it very confusing.

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#7
October 2, 2016 at 19:41:50
Unless you're overclocking (or underclocking) the bios can autodetect a lot of that stuff. The manual may help with settings too:

http://www.elhvb.com/supportbios.in...

Have you tried just popping in a new battery and seeing what happens?

message edited by DAVEINCAPS


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#8
October 3, 2016 at 10:31:09
✔ Best Answer
"With the ratio at 100/133 isn't the processor running slower than the memory? Is there a good reference on the web where I can learn about this. I find it very confusing."

The netburst architecture used in the P4 is inefficient. Up until the P4 was released, the recommended FSB:DRAM frequency ratio for best performance was 1:1. It was found that because of the deficiencies of netburst, P4 systems performed better if the RAM frequency is clocked one step faster than the CPU frequency. In other words: 100/133 (400FSB/266DDR), 133/166 (533FSB/333DDR), 200/266 (800FSB/533DDR), 266/333 (1066FSB/667DDR).

http://www.pcper.com/news/Editorial...

http://www.geek.com/chips/intel-to-...

QDR = Quad Data Rate also know as "quad pumping". It allows more data to be carried at the same clock speed. For example: if you drive a car at 50MPH & you're the only person in the car, you're going 50MPH. If you pick up 3 friends & drive at 50MPH, you're not going 200MPH, you're still going 50MPH but you're caryying 4x as many people. So in a way, DDR & QDR speeds are just marketing ploys. It's generally best to refer to actual frequencies rather than these bogus ratings.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quad_...

message edited by riider


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#9
October 3, 2016 at 11:14:20
Thanks to all for your responses. I'm now a little clearer on the FSB/DRAM ratio and the reasoning behind it. But does this ratio just apply to the P4? Current processors are still 1:1?

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