my dell dimension 2400 would not turn off so

December 12, 2010 at 09:40:46
Specs: Windows XP, intel celeron 2 .0 1 gb of memory
i switched it off at the wall then it would not boot up again the bios page botted up then it went to xp loading and froze.... i replaced my hard drive and now the computer says it does not reconise that i have an ethernet connection plus it is very slow and i can not change my display i think graphics card my be damaged or is it the motherboard?
help please

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#1
December 12, 2010 at 09:49:26
You could have tried doing an XP repair on the old hard drive. Since you replaced it and did a clean install of XP, you need to go to the manufacturers website and download and reinstall all the drivers. The chipset drivers are needed for ethernet, usb ports etc, that are on the motherboard. You'll need the graphics drivers for your display options.

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#2
December 12, 2010 at 10:12:16
The 1st thing you need to do is get your power from a different wall socket. Why on earth did you plug your PC into the socket connected to the light switch?

There was no need to replace the HDD, as grasshopper stated, all you probably need to do was run a "repair installation". A clean install almost always lacks the proper device drivers so as he stated, you're going to have to identify your hardware, locate the drivers, then download & install.


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#3
December 12, 2010 at 10:38:17
i tried the repair using xp disc the computer was on for 36 hrs straight before it finished repair . then there was no change when i rebooted the computer did the same thing. bios page came on and then froze at xp window

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#4
December 12, 2010 at 10:44:01
i tried the repair tool on xp disc but computer stayed on for 36 hrs straight before it finished the repair then it did the sme thing again boot up at bios and then froze...
i got some discs with the computer when i bought it one of then says it is a driver and ulities disc would it have all the the info i need rather than downloading from dell site?

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#5
December 12, 2010 at 11:58:58
If it came with the machine, then yes, that's what you need.

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#6
December 12, 2010 at 14:34:26
The computer mboard shuts off using the "Soft off" method - either by means of a software signal from the operating system, or by means of the mboard's bios Setup being set so that when you hold the power button in for 4 seconds the mboard will shut off.
If the operating system isn't working correctly, which could be caused by damaged data caused by a failing hard drive or other data corruption, or by the operating system simply being "frozen" for whatever reason, the operating system may not be able to provide the software signal to the mboard.
In that case, if the operating system won't Shut Down or Restart the normal way, if the bios Setup is set to shut off the mboard when the power button is held in for 4 seconds, which is the default in many bioses, doing that will shut down the mboard.

The operating system must have had the main chipset drivers for the mboard installed in it in order to be sure the ACPI support of the mboard, which includes how Restart, Shut Down, and Standby is supported, is recognized correctly, otherwise, one or any of those features may not work correctly. .
.......

XP doesn't have the drivers built in for most things that first came out after XP was first released, circa 2001, and it doesn't have some of the drivers built in for things made before that.

Whenever you load Windows from a regular Windows CD (or DVD) from scratch, after Setup is finished you must load the drivers for the mboard, particularly the main chipset drivers, in order for Windows to have the proper drivers for and information about your mboard hardware, including it's AGP or PCI-E, ACPI, USB 2.0 if it has it, and hard drive controller support. If you have a generic system and have the CD that came with the mboard, all the necessary drivers are on it. If you load drivers from the web, brand name system builders and mboard makers often DO NOT have the main chipset drivers listed in the downloads for your model - in that case you must go to the maker of the main chipset's web site, get the drivers, and load them.

"i replaced my hard drive and now the computer says it does not reconise that i have an ethernet connection plus it is very slow and i can not change my display"

The ethernet drivers were not built into the contents of Windows.
You must load the main chipset drivers for the mboard in order for the drives to be able to run as fast as they can on your computer.
You must load the specific drivers for your video adapter, which will usually allow Windows to load at least Plug and Play Monitor drivers. If you have an LCD monitor, it'srecommended you load the specific drivers for the monitor model, because when Plug and Play Monitor drivers are used you can choose settings that will DAMAGE the monitor.

All the drivers you need for your system are on your Drivers and Applications CD or DVD Recovery disk if you have that, or in the downloads for your mdel on the Dell web site, with the possible exception of the main chipset drivers.
.......

"i tried the repair using xp disc the computer was on for 36 hrs straight before it finished repair ."

In that case, the original hard drive was probably in the process of failing.

Check your hard drive with the manufacturer's diagnostics.
See the latter part of response 1 in this:
http://www.computing.net/windows95/...

If you don't have a floppy drive, you can get a CD image diagnostic utility from most hard drive manufacturer's web sites, but obviously you would need to make a burned CD, preferably a CD-R for best compatibility, on another computer if you need to.

E.g.
Seagate's Seatools will test any brand of hard drive.
Do the long test.
http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.j...

If the hard drive itself tests okay, any data problems found can be fixed, one way or another.
......

Your original power supply has either a 200 watt or 250 watt capacity.
Typically minimally sized, as is the case with most brand name systems.
I looked it up - It is not proprietary - it's a standard (PS/2) sized ATX power supply.

You have only 3 PCI slots, max, no AGP slot.

If you install a video card in a PCI slot, doing so will NOT disable the onboard video - if you want to disable that, you have to disable it in Device Manager in Windows under Display adapters.

Depending on what the PCI card's video chipset requires, you may need to get a power supply with more capacity.

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD ! )
If that info is not in the ad for the video card, you can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. Some power supplies have two or more +12v ratings - in that case, add those ratings to determine the total +12v current capacity.

E.g. if you have a 250 watt PS, you can use a Geforce 6200 card.

If you're a gamer...
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittent rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.

If you need to get a PS with more capacity, in this case you can replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...


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#7
December 12, 2010 at 14:45:27
"i tried the repair using xp disc the computer was on for 36 hrs straight"

How did you go about it? This is how to perform a repair:

1. When the Press any key to boot from CD message is displayed on your screen, press a key to start your computer from the Windows XP CD.

2. Press ENTER when you see the message To setup Windows XP now, and then press ENTER displayed on the Welcome to Setup screen.

3. Do not choose the option to press R to use the Recovery Console.

4. In the Windows XP Licensing Agreement, press F8 to agree to the license agreement.

5. Make sure that your current installation of Windows XP is selected in the box, and then press R to repair Windows XP.

6. Follow the instructions on the screen to complete Setup.

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/...

"i got some discs with the computer when i bought it one of then says it is a driver and ulities disc would it have all the the info i need rather than downloading from dell site?"

Assuming this is an older Dell system, the drivers on the Drivers CD are most likley very outdated. Install them if you like, but they should still be updated.


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