Mouse stopped working?

April 5, 2008 at 07:38:16
Specs: vista, e7600

Hi guys, My mouse has stopped working. Its not even showing up in device manager so its like the PC doesnt even see it. Tried the mouse on my other PC and it works fine so its not that. I ran a full virus scan which was clean, and did a sytem restore, which didnt help. I've read on the net that it can be caused by a resource conflict(whatever that means) but i dont think it can be that because it just stopped working for no apparent reason, nothing new was added/installed. Any ideas?

Cheers

Davie

Processor=Core2Duo E6700
Motherboard=ABIT Fatal1ty FP-IN9 SLI,nForce-650i SLI
GPU= 8800GTS320MB
HDD= Seagate Baracudda 7200.10 320
Zalman CNPS9500 Cooling
2GB Corsair XMS2 PC6400


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#1
April 5, 2008 at 08:21:32

USB or PS/2 mouse? Have you altered any BIOS settings?

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#2
April 5, 2008 at 12:33:09

Its a PS/2 mouse, and i didnt change anything in Bios. I have tried reloading my Bios default settings to fix it, with no joy. Like i said, looks like the pc just stopped detecting it.

Processor=Core2Duo E6700
Motherboard=ABIT Fatal1ty FP-IN9 SLI,nForce-650i SLI
GPU= 8800GTS320MB
HDD= Seagate Baracudda 7200.10 320
Zalman CNPS9500 Cooling
2GB Corsair XMS2 PC6400


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#3
April 6, 2008 at 08:11:25

Are you sure it is plugged into the right PS/2 port - the one farther from the case side on a desktop or tower computer??
A PS/2 mouse won't work in the PS/2 keyboard port on most desktop computers.
A PS/2 mouse WILL work in the single PS/2 port on most laptops.

Is your computer and everything that plugs into it that connects to AC power, and the cable that connects you to the internet, plugged into (a) device(s) that protects them from voltage surges and spikes?

Have there been any power outages or lightning storms in your area since the mouse last worked?

A friend of mine had a power surge or spike and it fried the circuits connected to his PS/2 mouse port.

In any case a USB or serial mouse should work fine.
.....



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#4
April 6, 2008 at 16:06:26

Everytihng is plugged in the right place. but now you mention it, we do get a lot of power cuts/spikes in this area. I was actually away on buisness when it stopped working, but my wife confirmed there were a couple of these while I was away, so you might be onto something. Is there any way I could check the port itself to see if its working, like a diagnostic program or something?(I already checked it visually to see if there were any burn marks or anything on the board or port, they looked fine)

Processor=Core2Duo E6700
Motherboard=ABIT Fatal1ty FP-IN9 SLI,nForce-650i SLI
GPU= 8800GTS320MB
HDD= Seagate Baracudda 7200.10 320
Zalman CNPS9500 Cooling
2GB Corsair XMS2 PC6400


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#5
April 7, 2008 at 08:21:15

You often can't see any physical indications of damage. It only takes a tiny extra amount of amperage (current) to damage the circuits connected to the port.
By the way, devices plugged into PS/2 ports are NOT "hot swappable" - they should only be plugged in or unplugged when the computer is not running, otherwise you can damage the circuits connected to them and/or the PS/2 connected device.

I know of no diagnostic program that can test a PS/2 mouse or PS/2 keyboard port and/or it's circuits that isn't working.

A PS/2 mouse or PS/2 keyboard port and circuits connected to it either works or it doesn't. The default in most bioses is the PS/2 mouse support is enabled or Auto, and when it is and a PS/2 mouse is connected, only a PS/2 mouse can use it's mandated IRQ 12, so another device using that IRQ is impossible, and it's extremely unlikely another device would use the same I/O address it requires, so you can pretty well always rule out a hardware resource conflict disabling a PS/2 mouse (or PS/2 keyboard).

It's a very good idea to use a device or devices that protect the things I mentioned from power spikes and surges - e.g there are power bars and UPSs that have that. However, a lightning strike on your AC power grid or close to your location can damage anything in spite of that. Better such devices come with insurance against damage that you can make a claim on, even in the case of lightning damage.

A USB or serial mouse should work fine.
However, a USB mouse may not be detected and usable the first yime you connect it until just before the Windows desktop has loaded. That's no problem if the computer has only one user and login is automatic because no password was used for the user, but if there is more than one user, or if a single user has to type a password while booting, you can use the Tab key on your keyboard to toggle to select the active selection if it isn't right (it has fine dots around it or is highlighted) and your Enter key and possibily the cursor keys to do what you need to do while booting.


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