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Monitor doesn't display anything

Samsung SyncMaster 710m F
October 30, 2006 at 07:03:27
Specs: win XP, Athlon AMD/ 1Gb RAM

Hello Everybody:

My COMPAQ brand computer was working fine for about a year long until this sudden message has come to screen saying
"Not Optimum Mode Recommended mode 1024 X 768 60 Hz".

I checked the System Unit; everything is working fine (the BIOS checks the components – the keyboard lights lit, it tries to boot from CD, the hard disk loads the OS) except the display to screen! The flat screen LCD monitor power light becomes green with that message being displayed at first but after a few seconds it becomes orange and no message at all.

At first I thought the problem was with the video card so I checked it by adding a PCI video card which was working in another computer, but there was no change the message was still the same except the “1024 X 768” changed to “1280 X 1024”. Moreover, I tried to logon the safe mode it didn’t work.

The name of the flat panel LCD Monitor is:
----------
| Samsung SyncMaster 710M |
| Model Code: GS17MSSS |
| Color Display Unit Type No: GH17MS |
| AC 100-240V ~ 50/60 Hz 0.7A |
| S/N: GS17HVEY400963H |
----------
I guess the problem is with the screen resolution and the refresh rate. How can I get access to the computer and change the screen resolution is the problem. I am very much worried about my computer. If anybody has any idea, I would be very much pleased to have it!

I'm in need of an immediate help, please.
Thank you.



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#1
October 30, 2006 at 08:39:00

Your display settings are improper for your monitor. If you lose the video after Windows starts to load, you have the resolution and/or the refresh rate set to something your LCD monitor cannot display in Windows.

If you have the CD that came with the monitor handy, insert it in a CD drive, or if you have downloaded the monitor drivers for your model, note where they are on your hard drive.

Plain Safe mode is useless for changing Monitor or Display Adapter settings - try using VGA Mode.

Repeatedly press F8 while booting (don't hold down the key) - when the menu appears choose Enable VGA Mode.
That will make the computer boot normally, and you will have a display, but the display is in a basic VGA mode that all monitors can display.

If you have the CD for the monitor, start it up by clicking on it in My Computer, and install the drivers for the monitor.

If you have a drivers download for your monitor model somewhere on your hard drive, go there. If it has not been executed yet, you may need to click on the file to have it extract some files, or you may need to unzip the file to have it extract some files. If there is a Setup or Install in those files, run the Setup or Install (if it has both run Setup).

If there is no Setup or Install, or if you don't have any drivers for your monitor handy, continue with the following.

RIGHT click on a blank area of the desktop, choose Properties -
that goes to Display Properties.
Choose Display - Settings
What is the Monitor listed?
Is it Default, or Plug and Play, or something other than Samsung 710M?
If it is set to Plug and Play, LCD monitors cannot display all of the possible settings you can choose when Windows is set to that, particularly resolutions and refresh rates higher than the maximums for the monitor.

Choose Display - Settings - Advanced - Monitor - Properties - Driver - Update Driver.
Change the default choice to: Install from a list... , Next
Change the default choice to: Don't search, I will choose.... , Next
You will see a list of Models
It may say
- Plug and Play Monitor
- and possibly Default Monitor
- and/or possibly another monitor other than Samsung 710M

If you have the drivers somewhere on your hard drive, choose the Have Disk button, and browse to where the driver files are or were extracted to - Windows is looking for a file ending in .inf

If you have no drivers handy, and Display -Settings was set to Default Monitor or Plug and Play Monitor, or something other than Samsing 710M, Default Monitor is not good enough, and Plug and Play Monitor is not ideal for an LCD monitor - you need to choose something better. To choose a better driver, click on the checkmark in the small square beside Show Compatible Hardware to remove it, then select Standard Types - Digital Flat Panel (1280 x 1024) or whatever max resolution your LCD monitor will do.

You are best off to load the proper drivers for the Samsung 710M - Windows will only show you the video adapter and monitor settings the monitor is capable of by default in that case and you can't set something the monitor can't do.

FYI: If know from recent experience you don't necessarily have to use the "Native resolution" setting for a fairly recent Samsung monitor - it will still look very good at other resolutions.

Turn on Clear Type in Windows XP - makes type on LCD screens look clearer
http://www.microsoft.com/typography...



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#2
October 30, 2006 at 08:58:31

After changing your Monitor type, you should get a normal display in Windows when you boot normally after that.
......

If you still get a black screen after choosing Enable VGA mode, you need to go into your bios Setup and make sure the settings for your type of video adapter you have the monitor connected to are set right. e.g. Initialize display first (or similar) should be set to AGP for an AGP card, PCI for a PCI card, etc. If you have an AGP card, if there is a setting to assign an IRQ for AGP, that must be On or Enabled. If you have an AGP card, if there is a setting for the X speed of the card, it must be set to a setting both the card and the mboard support, preferably the maximum setting.

On some computers if you have an AGP card and Initialize display first (or similar) is set to PCI, you will get no video after Windows sarts to load.


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#3
October 30, 2006 at 10:04:07

Tubesandwires, I would like to thank your for your detailed and helpful explanations!

But, when I power on my PC I don't see anything on the screen except that " not optimum mode recommended mode 1024 x 768" message floating on and disapears after a few seconds. I can't see even the BIOS messages. But there is one thing, the Screen flickers after the message and green power light turns to orange.

By the way can I take the hardisk off and try conecting it in another computer and set the optimum modes and reconnect it back.
Does that work?

I thank you (Tubesandwires) again for your co-operation!



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Related Solutions

#4
October 30, 2006 at 10:25:45

Did your try the monitor on another computer?

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#5
October 30, 2006 at 10:33:01

All right, in that case...

You can also get that message from some monitors themselves if the computer does not start up normally, or, rarely, if your video card is not working, because the monitor is not receiving a video signal. For those monitors it will usually display the same message if you unplug the monitor from the computer. You didn't specifically say your computer was not working.

Probably the most common reason for a computer not starting up is the power supply has failed - it may partially work yet not boot farther than a certain point, or it may not work at all.
Check your PS.
See response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

If you have not been fiddling with anything inside the computer case, the second most common reason of no boot is overheating of your cpu has damaged the cpu to the extent that it no longer works. If the PS seems to start up, it's fan spins, the hard drive(s) spin, yet the computer does nothing after that, you will probably find when you look inside the case that the cpu fan is no longer spinning.


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#6
October 31, 2006 at 01:16:49

I thank you all for your concern,

I haven't yet tried the monitor on another computer. Because I don't have any spare part.

But I am sure that the PS and the CPU are working fine. I looked inside the computer removing the cover, the CPU fun was spinning. I even tried replacing the CMOS Battery and reseting the ROM, but none of these helped. When I insert an OS CD in the CD-ROM it tries to boot from the CD.
When I reboot the computer the keyboard lights lit (detects the keyboards), it detects the hardisk (I can hear the spinning sound).

What I can't see is these all progresses on the screen. I see nothing but only that troublesome message!


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#7
October 31, 2006 at 08:46:48

"I haven't yet tried the monitor on another computer. Because I don't have any spare part."

Surely you know someone who has a computer you could connect your monitor to. For that matter, you could take your computer case to where that person is and try their monitor with your computer.

If your LCD monitor does not work on the other computer even while booting before Windows loads, it is common for the voltage inverter and/or the backlight to fail after an LCD monitor has been used for some time.
For some info about replacing a voltage inverter or backlight, and what some typical symptoms are, see response 5 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

"But I am sure that the PS and the CPU are working fine. I looked inside the computer removing the cover, the CPU fun was spinning. "

The cpu fan spinning is a good sign and indicates the cpu has probably not overheated and damaged itself, assuming the heatsink was properly installed and there is adequate thermal grease or a thermal pad there - if you have not re-installed the cpu heatsink or have not had to replace a dead cpu fan it is probably okay.
You can't tell if the PS is working properly by just looking at it and seeing that the fan for it is spinning. It is common for a PS to partially fail - it's fan may spin, other fans connected to the mboard may spin, hard drives may spin, but the computer may not boot any further.
A failing PS can produce too much voltage and damage components connected to it and the mboard - including the video.

"I even tried replacing the CMOS Battery and reseting the ROM, but none of these helped."

That almost always doesn't help for a problem like yours.

"When I insert an OS CD in the CD-ROM it tries to boot from the CD.
When I reboot the computer the keyboard lights lit (detects the keyboards), it detects the hardisk (I can hear the spinning sound)."

That's encouraging, but it doesn't necessarily mean the computer is working properly other than the video.

However...
If the hard drive is accessed repeatedly after the initial part of the boot, seeming like it is actually loading Windows like it did before your video problem appeared, then you can be pretty sure that either your monitor or its connection to the computer is not working, or there is something wrong with the video card or its connection in it's slot is poor - the latter is very unlikely if you have not been fiddling with the video card physically.
.....

Other things.

Is this computer and everything connected to it protected from power spikes and surges? Whether or not that's the case, have you experienced any power outages or nearby lightning since the video last worked properly?

"At first I thought the problem was with the video card so I checked it by adding a PCI video card which was working in another computer, but there was no change..."

Sometimes people say video card when what they actually have is onboard video.
Does your computer have onboard video (a 15 pin hole D shaped port directly connected to the mboard), or does it have an AGP video card in a slot, or does it have onboard video and an AGP slot with no video card in it?

If you have onboard video and a card in an AGP slot, you will get no video if you connect to the onboard video port because the onboard video is auto disabled when there is a card in the AGP slot.

If you have onboard video and a card in an AGP slot, if you did remove the AGP card when you tried the PCI card, or if you have onboard video and an AGP slot but no card in the slot, on many mboards the PCI card will not work either because the bios expects an AGP card to be in a slot in order to disable the onboard video, the onboard video is not disabled, and the onboard video and PCI video card clash because they are trying to both use computer resources at the same time - if you get a display at all on the PCI card, it is garbled.


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#8
October 31, 2006 at 21:07:40

"Is this computer and everything connected to it protected from power spikes and surges?" ...

Unfortunately not. There is only a divider with a fuse directly to the wall outlet. I don't have any Stabilizer or UPS. These might have probably damaged the PS or the video or the Monitor itself.

"Does your computer have onboard video (a 15 pin hole D shaped port directly connected to the mboard), or does it have an AGP video card in a slot, or does it have onboard video and an AGP slot with no video card in it?"

My computer has an onboard video only.

Tubesandwires, all the technical advices you have given me until now is incredible. I apprecaite your long posts. you gave me a lot of options, I will try each one of them. I'll check it out if I may need to purchase a new PS or Monitor.

If you have some more idea to add I'm glad to have it.

once again thank you very much!


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#9
November 1, 2006 at 08:35:38

""Is this computer and everything connected to it protected from power spikes and surges?""
"Unfortunately not. There is only a divider with a fuse directly to the wall outlet. I don't have any Stabilizer or UPS. These might have probably damaged the PS or the video or the Monitor itself."

Yes, it's possible a power spike or surge has damaged something - from what I've seen it's usually only the power supply, but lightning in particular can damage lots of things.
Power bars with spike/surge protection built in are relatively inexpensive - smaller units with just two or more telephone ports and maybe one AC plug in are also available. Ones with an led that indicates the protection is working are the minimum you should get - some also come with an attached equipment warranty, they will replace anything connected properly to the power bar or other unit (e.g. no extension cords) if everything including all AC powered and AC to DC adapter powered things connected to the computer, and any telephone line or cable internet connection are protected. Some power bars have telephone cable and/or internet cable (coaxial) ports built in, but technically it is better to use smaller seperate units for those. The better products will replace the unit if it EVER fails (e.g. some Tripplite products, but you have to ship the failed unit somewhere); most others if the led indicating the protection is working goes out, you throw it out or use it for something that doesn't require protection, and get another one.

"My computer has an onboard video only."

In that case, connecting a working monitor to a PCI video card should give you video at least until Windows loads. You may need to change Intialize Video first or similar in your bios Setup to get the card to work properly in Windows itself.

If the PS seems to be no good, try a borrowed used working PS if you can before you buy one and try it - all the wire colors and positions of them and number of wires in the main connector from the power supply must be the same.

Since you didn't state you have a brand name system, your PS is probably not proprietary, and you can use a standard power supply.

If you need a new PS, don't buy the cheapest ones - they are a lot more likely to give you problems later on.
I can't tell from the specs in your first post what capacity you would need, but I've been told by the people at a place that builds systems all the time if you have an older system that doesn't have PCI-e slots, 350 watts will do you fine. Buy a PS brand that has a good reputation, a decent web site, has at least a 1 year, or preferably a 3 year, warranty, and that has anti-short and over-voltage protection built in.
Most new PS's have a 20 position main connector, and a 4 position connector in the same wiring bundle that can be clipped onto the 20 position one, so that both 20 pin or 24 pin main connectors on a mboard can be accomodated.



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