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modem causing phone line static?

April 13, 2005 at 05:39:59
Specs: XP Home, 1.0 GHz / 384 MB

We have had phone line static since we moved into our house 2 years ago. We always thought it was our cordless phones interfering with something in the house. The other day I happened to unplug the phone line from our modem at the same time I was talking on the phone and the phone static stopped. So now I'm wondering if it's the modem causing this static? Is it going to make any difference if I go out and buy a new modem? I'd hate to do this unless I'm pretty sure it's going to help. Are there any settings that I could try changing that might affect this? I guess our other option would be to install a 2nd phone line just for the computer. Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.


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#1
April 13, 2005 at 07:17:04

What you are experiencing is "white noise" this is very common with electical components connected together. It is the same as you get when you plug hi-fi seperates together, just turn up the volume, when nothing is actually playing, and you will hear it. It is an interaction between components, and you will be pleased to hear, for the most part it shouldn't cause any problems. Items nowadays have to have all types of filters in them, to guard against interference with other items.

As to whether or not you would get the same results if you bought another modem, to be honest there is no answer, you may, you may not. It depends on many factors, but take heart in the fact that it is not affecting the performance of your modem.

A new modem may have better filters, but even this is not a certainty, you may still end up with some white noise.

AMD64Bit 3800+ Socket 939
WinXP Pro.
Nvidia:6800GT
Dane Electronic Pro. Dual 1024MB 400MHz RAM
Tagan 480Watt PSU: 28Amps on +12volt rail.
Asus A8V Deluxe "WiFi" M/Board -
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#2
April 13, 2005 at 08:14:33

Modems are dirt cheap, get a new one and worst case it does not help, you simply return it for your refund.


Do not type anything in this space.


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#3
April 13, 2005 at 10:08:01

The above post from Quicksilver is pure baloney

You should not be hearing this "static," and for someone to suggest it won't cause any problems is a complete misrepresentation. Of COURSE it can cause problems, in the case of your modem, slowing data transmission.

It probably is a protection component, such as an MOV (metal oxide varistor) or other surge protection device, which has in fact, been "surged" at some point, and now it is trying to break down.

IF you can for certain eliminate everything but the modem, then simply replace the modem.

Be careful that you switch wall jacks and wall cables to be sure that it is not something in the wiring.

Years ago, I had a phone jack which shared a commom wall--through the wall--one jack in the bath, and one jack in the bedroom. The thing absorbed just enough moisture that it would "short" part of the ringing voltage--over 100 VAC, and cause the ringer to be weak. It ALSO caused static from time to time. The only reason I found it, is that I was repairing a wall heater, and decided that I didn't need that unused jack in the bath, and removed it.


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#4
April 13, 2005 at 14:22:35

"The above post from Quicksilver is pure baloney

You should not be hearing this "static," and for someone to suggest it won't cause any problems is a complete misrepresentation. Of COURSE it can cause problems, in the case of your modem, slowing data transmission.

It probably is a protection component, such as an MOV (metal oxide varistor) or other surge protection device, which has in fact, been "surged" at some point, and now it is trying to break down."

I stand by my post, by the way an MOV is primarily used to surpress surges. Talk to any guy who knows the slightest about components that give static/white noise where there is a link to an analogue output, as a phone headset, (think of the speaker ) .

I didn't say there would be no problems: "for the most part it shouldn't cause any problems." Not the same as saying there would be no problems eh.

With regard to your comment "been "surged" at some point, and now it is trying to break down."
read what the guy said, "We have had phone line static since we moved into our house 2 years ago." From a surge to 2 years before break down, no way. Think of the list: rectifiers, trasient v suppressors, z diodes, switching diodes, transistors.
Are you going down that road for break down points?

You are entitled to your opinion, right or wrong. But using words like baloney and misrepresentation is b*llsh**. I have never knowningly misrepresented anything to anyone on this site and never would and I don't like the accusation.

In the end it is up to the guy what he does.

AMD64Bit 3800+ Socket 939
WinXP Pro.
Nvidia:6800GT
Dane Electronic Pro. Dual 1024MB 400MHz RAM
Tagan 480Watt PSU: 28Amps on +12volt rail.
Asus A8V Deluxe "WiFi" M/Board -
AquaGate


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#5
April 13, 2005 at 14:33:57

I have been an electronics service engineer for over 30 years. Up to now I give quicksilver 95% for accuracy. maybe a bit more mmm.

Still, right or wrong, bad attitudes and insults should not be part of this forum.


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#6
April 13, 2005 at 14:37:11

Kipper

Only 95%, oh dear, I must be really getting old. ;(

AMD64Bit 3800+ Socket 939
WinXP Pro.
Nvidia:6800GT
Dane Electronic Pro. Dual 1024MB 400MHz RAM
Tagan 480Watt PSU: 28Amps on +12volt rail.
Asus A8V Deluxe "WiFi" M/Board -
AquaGate


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#7
April 13, 2005 at 14:50:57

"""for the most part it shouldn't cause any problems."""


This is the statement I am referring to, and I stick by this arguement.

A phone line should have no audible static, and if it does, it WILL cause data slowdowns, plain and simple.


I don't know that an MOV (or other component) in the modem is causing the problem, that is the reason that I mentioned the example of the wet phone line.


First of all, I did not insult anyone, I simply suggested that the implication that noise and static on an analogue device is "normal" IS baloney.

Of COURSE if you "turn up the volume" enough, you will finally hear something, but in some cases--depending on shielding, component quality, connections-cables and a hundred other things--you will at some point hear static, noise, hum.

You SHOULD NOT HEAR audible static, noise, hum, on a normal phone receiver. If the garbage is so bad that you can hear it, as posted, over a phone receiver, then it's not "normal."

Kipper, if you've been an electronics engineer for 30 years, why didn't you post the answer?


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#8
April 13, 2005 at 15:37:22

First of all, I didn't answer because I feel that the other guy said most of it.
Secondly, your comment- You SHOULD NOT HEAR audible static, noise, hum, on a normal phone receiver. If the garbage is so bad that you can hear it, as posted, over a phone receiver, then it's not "normal." " is not fully correct. The theory is that there should be no noise, the fact is a different matter.
Because computer modems transmit and receive data at a much higher speed than do analog telephones or fax machines, computer modems demand much higher quality wiring. Telephone wiring outside the home can cause similar problems. Audible noise or static on the telephone line is not tolerated by modems. Line noise, even below the threshold of hearing, have even caused disconnects. Please notice the words "Audible noise or static".

I'm not saying the guy with the problem has been having disconections, what I am saying is, you can and do, have static/white noise on many, many phones. Just like keeferb is hearing. The only phones that get close to zero noise, for the most part are cell phones, hard line phones are a different matter. If keeferb wants to get a modem, fine, they are cheap enough, but I will have to go along with quicksilver in saying that, there is no absolute surity of getting absolute silence i.e. no "noise" it is a case of maybe/maybe not. We could move into the area of what is the condition of keeferb's lines from outside to his phone ? Has he an extention phone ? Is there an answering machine ? It goes on and on, all of these are factors. I believe the reply given by qsilver was a good one, it layed it out in easy non-tech terms.
I too stick to what I say. But I will not get into a question and answer situation, the first guy keeferb asked a question,he was given an answer that gave a good indication of what the problem may be. You disagreed as is fine. Now I think it should be up to keeferb to decide what to do after all he has read.


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#9
April 14, 2005 at 22:15:21

i bought a filter for my phone line after i got adsl connected as my phone had what i will describe as 'modem noises' going through it. fixed the problem right up for about $20australian. don't buy a new modem if this is what you are hearing, and if it is, i commend your tolerance for putting up with that for 2 years!

The first step to wisdom is being able to admit when you don't know.


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