MOBO died need to upgrade hardware?

May 12, 2013 at 09:07:36
Specs: Windows 7, 3.1GHz/4gb
Hello all you experts need a little help. My mobo i guess has died. or at least from what i can figure out has happened. So i need to replace it and I am not in the computer world as much as I would like to be.
Anyways I need to know what would be equivalent to a Intel quad core Q9950 chip and a Asus board and a video card of gtx 9800+ of today. So a chip of that quality in today's market. I know the board and chip are no longer available expect for manufactured but i would like to upgrade.

I use my system for mostly watching HD sports and movies. And i have a large and extensive itunes file.(over100gb)

What would be appropriate for me to even consider.
Was looking at the A10-5800 or the fx-???? with the 6 core processor.


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#1
May 12, 2013 at 12:04:57
Tell us why you think your motherboard has died.

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#2
May 12, 2013 at 12:48:51
Yeah, something else could be the problem. No need to start tossing hundreds in the street when a $35 power supply might be the problem.

Edit: Can't spell...

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#3
May 12, 2013 at 17:23:39
Sorry should of listed all the things that i have done. New PS, ram, cheap vid card and hard drive. Cleaned the system from top to bottom and put new heat sink paste on the chip. The lock ups of the system occur even when in bios.
And took it to a computer shop where i stated above and they didn't want to charge me the 100 bucks just to tell me what i kind of figured out.

Specs of machine.
Windows 7
Chip is an Intel q9550
MSI p7nsli
4gb DDR2 5300 ram Kingston/PNY
Gforce 9800+ Card
Western digital 500gb sata/64mb cache
Corsair 700w power supply.


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Related Solutions

#4
May 12, 2013 at 20:04:56
Lock ups in BIOS is more likely bad memory. If you have more than one memory stick, remove one and try in BIOS, if not, the swap out other stick and try again.
Normally I would test memory with Memtest, but it would not convince you that it is the memory as readily as finding out that it no longer freezes in BIOS with only one of your two sticks. After, you can run Memtest from a bootable CD you prepare and confirm each stick, though you should replace dual channel memory as pairs.
It is always better to test before purchasing random hardware and spending lots of money. If you end up needing a motherboard, you should either look for one that will support your CPU, or you will basically be building a completely new machine (CPU, MB, RAM, GPU, PS, possibly more). This is not necessarily a bad thing, just something you need to do with your eyes open so you plan your system carefully and choose the best components that will work best together. Many a time money is wasted trying to use too many old components and making bad choices so that the system does not perform as well as it should and you end up spending more than you should before all is done and running well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
May 12, 2013 at 20:29:26
Memtest86 +
http://www.memtest.org/
U can also run it from a USB stick.

I use my system for mostly watching HD sports and movies
Then all u need is an APU.

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.


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#6
May 12, 2013 at 23:23:19
Even with brand new ram and running memtest that does pass still get lock ups in bios. The only thing that i have not replaced is the chip and board.
There is even lock ups when running memtest.

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#7
May 13, 2013 at 04:02:50
Lock ups in Memtest could still be bad memory since Memtest runs within a small amount of the memory so running one stick at a time and switching is the way to confirm this. Since you swapped the memory out, this lessens the possibility of it being the memory (though still slightly possible).
Have you tried resetting CMOS, then resetting BIOS to defaults, then manually configuring specific BIOS settings? There are a few things in BIOS that could cause this issue, including overclocking, undervolting (memory, chipset, VCore, etc), to name a few. Certainly worth a try.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
May 13, 2013 at 05:31:11
"put new heat sink paste on the chip"

It's very inportant that this is done correctly. You really haven't listed your specs in detail but I'm guessing your CPU is a Q9950? If that's the case, the paste should have been applied using the "horizontal line" method. If you did it any differently, the CPU may be immediately overheating & causing the lockups.

http://www.elitekiller.com/pics/AS5...

http://www.arcticsilver.com/pdf/app...

Other than that, check the board for swollen or leaking capacitors.

http://thecomputerwarriors.com/imag...


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#9
May 13, 2013 at 07:08:29
I did as instructed when applying the heatsink paste. The Cpu will stay cool and sometimes will boot all the way into windows. From day to day it will get to different states of what i am doing. The longest that the computer has run is about 20 hours or so. Even when monitoring the cpu the temp always stays below 50C. So I don't think its a heating issue. I have never been able to keep it under the 50 marker.
When I first start computer it will boot to windows. Then when the first lock up happens I get no boot. I have to wait 30 seconds or so and let it sit. Then it will boot again go into windows for a min or two and lock up. then no boot. Wait 30 second restart and the locks up time just get shorter and shorter. After initial run for the 20 hours never been able to repeat.

As far as the specs of my machine the only thing that i am not sure of the is the boards. Or how to tell the board id with out the computer on.
See above post for specs.

The cmos battery did die and i did load the default settings in bios. I have never messed with the setting as my machine is not over clocked.


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#10
May 13, 2013 at 09:01:01
Default settings may not be the best for the system. You typically need to check the CPU & RAM settings to make sure they are right, set the boot order, hard drive/SATA settings, graphics settings and often others.
A high of 50C is not bad for a quad, but have you checked other temperatures? Use HWMonitor to check all temperatures and voltages as well. The symptoms you describe do sound like overheating, if it is not the CPU, then possibly the chipset or other component or even your power supply overheating or going out of range with heat (voltages not staying within 5% of nominal values as things warm up).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#11
May 13, 2013 at 09:04:45
You can note motherboard model from printing on motherboard itself.
Have you carefully looked over the motherboard for burnt or bulging capacitors or other visible signs of problems as mentioned above?

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#12
May 13, 2013 at 11:23:41
Are you using a new or recycled hard drive? Post the specs on the hard drive. Also post the model of your power supply.

Also appears you are mixing brands of RAM which may run at different speeds, voltages, etc.

To eliminate other hardware you should bench test the board outside the case. Power supply, motherboard, CPU/HS/fan, integrated or add in graphics, 1 stick of RAM, wired keyboard, monitor.

NO other hardware and not case to board connections. Connect the main power connector and the CPU and graphics auxiliary power connectors ONLY. No other add in cards. No USB devices except for keyboard if necessary, No drives, mouse, printers, scanners, cameras, etc.

Start the system by temporarily shorting the 2 power switch pins on the motherboard. Enter the BIOS if you POST and let it set there for at least a couple of hours. Check the temperatures and voltages while in the BIOS screens.

50c is too high for an idle temperature. Redo the paste after cleaning off all old paste.


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#13
May 13, 2013 at 20:22:33
I get 50c while intial boot up and entering windows and then when i run bios only it only gets to 38C. No mixed ram is being used during this test. Fresh new ram because it was so cheap. Power supply is a Corsair GS700.

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#14
May 13, 2013 at 20:51:02
Try my suggestion to run minimal hardware. If the system still locks up then you may actually have a motherboard defect. My guess is that it won't lockup.

Be sure the 1 stick of RAM settings are set to specification.


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