MOBO change

December 17, 2010 at 09:23:20
Specs: Windows 7, q6600/4GB DDR2 800
I currently have an ASUS P5N-MX (socket LGA775) but the pcie expansion slot went bad. I guess the easiest fix would be a new MOBO but I can't find this same MOBO anywhere. I found an ASUS P5N-D at newegg, somewhat similar. If I swap the old for this new board, will it recognize the old hard drive (I am keeping everything else on the old computer, I can use the same DDR2 800 memory) or will I have to so something else with the new board?

Thanks in advance for any replies.


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#1
December 17, 2010 at 10:06:53
"I found an ASUS P5N-D at newegg, somewhat similar"

Somewhat similar? I don't think so. The following board is "somewhat similar":

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

You will have to reinstall Windows due to the differences in hardware, so make sure you back up all your important documents in advance. I've never worked with Win7 before but a "repair installation" may be possible.


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#2
December 17, 2010 at 10:43:05
"I currently have an ASUS P5N-MX (socket LGA775) but the pcie expansion slot went bad. "

Are you SURE ?
If you're not getting video from a video card in a PCI-E X16 slot, there are many possible causes of that - only one of them is the PCI-E slot is not working properly, and that's a lot less likely.

If you're getting video from a video card in a PCI-E X16 slot while booting BEFORE Windows starts to load, but no video in Windows, that situation is easily fixed.
.........

"You will have to reinstall Windows due to the differences in hardware,..."

You DO NOT have to install Windows from scratch.

If your Windows installation was working fine when the hard drive was connected to the previous mboard, you can run a Repair installation of Windows procedure, and that will NOT delete the personal data you have added to the partition Windows is on.

You will need a Windows CD of the same version as the one of your Windows installation, Home or Pro, and the Product Key, preferably the one that was used to install it, but it can be one for the same version as the one of your Windows installation.
In most cases you get the Product Key from the official Microsoft sticker on your computer case, or from the official Microsoft sticker that came with your Windows CD if it has not been stuck to the case, or if you can't find that or don't have that, you can use a program to find the Product Key your Windows installation is presently using, BEFORE you run the Repair Setup (Repair install) - e.g. search for: Keyfinder, by Jelly Bean whatever.


How to do an XP Repair installation step by step:
http://www.windowsreinstall.com/win...


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#3
December 17, 2010 at 11:41:31
The user apparently has Win7, not WinXP. As I stated, I am not familiar with Win7 so I'm unsure if a "repair installation" is an option.

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#4
December 17, 2010 at 11:51:06
"Are you SURE ?"

Not really. I had a stand alone video card in the slot for about 1 year, a few days ago I got nothing on my screen at boot up, I took out the video card and hooked up the monitor to the on board, everything worked fine, At this point I thought the video card went bad so I bought a new one and put it on the pcie slot, same result, nothing on the screen, this is why I think the pcie slot went bad.

The repair install should not be a problem since I put Windows 7 on about 4 months ago (over Vista) and still have the disk.


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#5
December 18, 2010 at 08:31:24
"I had a stand alone video card in the slot..."

All actual CARDs are "stand alone".

Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD !

The term CARD is frequently mis-used. A device adapter is NOT a CARD unless it's on a physical board that plugs into a slot or connector inside the case that's on the mboard. The same applies to other device adapters that are built into the mboard - onboard sound adapters, onboard network adapters, etc., etc.
A PC Card (PCMCIA card) adapter or an ExpressCard adapter for a laptop or netbook IS a CARD because you've plugging into a connector directly connected to the mboard inside the case. Laptops and netbooks sometimes have other removable CARDs inside the case that plug directly into the mboard - a wired or wireless network adapter card or a dial-up modem adapter card; many have a power related card that also has one or more USB ports on it; high end laptops may have a video card, but most laptops DO NOT. .
As I interpret CARD, any device adapter you plug into a USB or firewire port is NOT a CARD.

"..... I had a stand alone video card in the slot for about 1 year, a few days ago I got nothing on my screen at boot up, I took out the video card and hooked up the monitor to the on board, everything worked fine, At this point I thought the video card went bad so I bought a new one and put it on the pcie slot, same result, nothing on the screen, this is why I think the pcie slot went bad."

It is extremely unlikely there is anything wrong with the PCI-E slot's circuits, unless you had a power failure event that damaged them, or you did something yourself that damaged them, such as
- you unplugged or plugged in a PCI-E card without disconnecting the AC power to the case
- you didn't have the card fastened down while the computer was running, and merely plugging in a monitor moved it upward in it's slot - PCI-E cards / slots have contacts that are very close together and the card and PCI-E slot circuits can easily be damaged when that happens.

If you're SURE you didn't do anything that may have caused damage, then this may be your problem when the old and new PCI-E video card will not produce video, yet the onboard video works fine...

Your power supply is defective or does not have enough capacity to handle the power requirements of the video chipset of the card in the PCI-E slot.

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD ! )
If that info is not in the ad for the video card, you can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. Some power supplies have two or more +12v ratings - in that case, add those ratings to determine the total +12v current capacity.

If you're a gamer...
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittent rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.


If you need to get a PS with more capacity, you can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
......

If your PS did not have enough capacity to handle the the power requirements of the video chipset of the card in the PCI-E slot, the card often works for a while anyway, but the PS is being loaded to 100% or nearly so of it's capacity all the time the computer is running. It probably can't handle being loaded to over 80% of it's capacity continuously, and the PS is eventually damaged and can no longer produce video from the card when it is installed.

Failing power supplies are common and can cause your symptoms.
Check your PS.
See response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...
See the part about checking the voltage readings for +3.3v, +5.0v, and +12.0v in the bios

If you find no signs of the PS having been damaged and those voltages are okay, your PS may still be damaged - the only way to rule out the PS for sure is to try out another known good PS that has at least the minimum capacity the video chipset on the card needs. If you have a suitable PS in another computer you own, or if can borrow one from a friend's computer for testing purposes, try connecting that.

A video card's video chipset may fail if it has a fan and heat sink on it, if the fan and heat sink are clogged with dust and lint, or if the fan stops spinning or spins too slowly.
(DO NOT use a vacuum cleaner to clean off dust and lint that's on anything inside the computer case or still installed on the mboard.)

You can test the original PCI-E video card in another mboard on another working computer - if you get video, there's nothing wrong with it.


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#6
December 18, 2010 at 09:09:30
Thanks tubesandwires for the response, but, taking what I wrote above at face value,that the old card was working fine for one year, then one morning at boot up it did not work (nothing was moved so the card did not get dislodged or bent),but the on board worked, so I buy a new card,making sure that the power was in fact turned off and the card was properly seated, and this card does not work. You say it is unlikely that the pci-e slot went bad (yet, when I called the tech support guy, he said it was fairly common with old boards) I am at a loss for any other explanation, hence, my original inquiry about just changing the board.

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#7
December 18, 2010 at 09:23:56
Oh, and regarding the PS, this is what I put in when I bought the card:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

Both are about 1 year old.


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#8
December 18, 2010 at 10:11:20
"when I called the tech support guy, he said it was fairly common with old boards"

It's random these days whether the tech support person you happen to talk to actually knows what they are talking about. You may very well have been talking to someone in India or some other country rather than in the US or wherever you are located. I know of no such problem with older mboards regarding the PCI-E slot in particular, but .....

Some mboards develop this problem - electrolytic capacitors were installed on them that were not properly made, and they fail eventually - the mboard manufacturer didn't know they were improperly made at the time the mboard was made.

Open up your case and examine the mboard to see if you have bad capacitors, and/or other findable signs of mboard damage .

This was the original bad capacitor problem - has some example pictures.
History of why the exploding capacitors and which mboard makers were affected:
http://members.datafast.net.au/~dft...

What to look for, mboard symptoms, example pictures:
http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Home page that site
- what the problem is caused by
- he says there are STILL bad capacitors on more recent mboards.
http://www.badcaps.net/

Pictures of blown capacitors, other components, power supplies, Athlon cpu's, etc.:
http://www.halfdone.com/Personal/Jo...
.........

Your new PS should be able to handle any current video chipset on any video card, or even most cards that have two video chipsets on one card, or two cards with a single video chipset on each if your mboard has more than one PCI-E X 16 slot.

However, if the original PS was defective or damaged, it's random whether that PS has damaged something other than itself on the mboard or that was connected to the mboard. The more el-cheapo the original PS was, the more likely something else was damaged.
And - I know of at least one mboard that had PCI-E slot X16 circuits definately damaged by a power failure event - power spikes and/or surges.


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