Solved Logitech H530 Headset - How test for speech

October 23, 2011 at 11:36:10
Specs: Windows 7, Pentium Dual-Core E5400 / 4BG

I am due to take part in a conference call to be held over the Internet. I need to test my Logitech H530 USB headset before the call starts to check that my speech will be heard by the other participants but I do not how to carry out this test.

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✔ Best Answer
October 26, 2011 at 07:15:48

When the headset is connected via USB, obviously it's connecting to the sound adapter a different way, but otherwise the same things probably apply. You would need to disconnect the amplified speakers, or turn down their volume or switch them off on the speakers themselves, if you don't want what you hear in the headphones to be heard from the amplified speakers.
An exception to that MIGHT be it's possible configuration settings for the sound adapter MAY be able make the sound only come out of the headphones when you use the Mic, if you use non-default settings.

When you do have sound coming out of the amplified speakers, you can have feedback problems when you use a Mic. To eliminate the feedback, turn the volume down for the Mic, or turn the volume down for your computer speakers on the speakers themselves or in Windows, or change the position of the speakers so the front of them is facing a different direction.
.........

Your info so far seemed to indicate that if you were using Sound Recorder, if there was nothing else wrong, you didn't catch on to what grasshopper said in response 3 - "Make sure you see the sound bar moving when you are recording" - in Vista or Windows 7 (I'm assuming it's the same in Windows 7) you should see the green bar graph in Sound Recorder while you're recording - you probably weren't seeing that.

When I tried my own conventionally connected headset in Vista, I found I had to increase the Mic Boost volume control from it's minimum, otherwise the green bar graph barely showed up in Sound Recorder while making a recording.

When I found that, it occured to me you may not have clicked on the Levels tab and discovered you had that additional volume control and /or you may have found that and need to do that too.

I found Sound Recorder doesn't produce a usable recording (no green bar graph)
- if the Mic is Muted in the Windows Sound mixer settings and can't actually produce sound.
- if the Mic is plugged in but the Sound settings aren't detecting it as being plugged in (Working).

My headset Mic is not detected when I plug it into the front case Mic port for whatever reason, but it's detected fine when plugged into the Mic port on the back of the case.
Either I was missing some setting being Muted or disabled in my Sound settings, or I didn't connect the wiring for the front Mic port to the mboard correctly.
I'll figure that out eventually.

I'm dual booting XP and Vista.
In XP, which is what I use most of the time, when the Mic is Muted in the Windows sound mixer settings when you're not using a program that can use a Mic, it's automatically un-muted there when you use a program that can use a Mic. I know from previous experiences that the same applies to previous Windows versions back to and including Win 95.



#1
October 23, 2011 at 12:23:19

Open the Control panel and choose Hardware and Sound. Then choose sound / manage audio devices / microphone.

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#2
October 23, 2011 at 13:43:21

Thanks. I tried that. In Control Panel, I chose Sound (I did not see an option to choose Hardware and Sound) and I selected the Play tab. I right-clicked on Logitech USB Headset and chose the Test option. I heard a sound in my left ear and then my right ear.

That's fine but I also need to test that my speech is being detected. Can I use the sound recorder in Windows to record what I say into the headset? I have tried to that but the sound files I have created have no sound.


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#3
October 23, 2011 at 14:35:34

yes, you can use the sound recorder. Make sure you see the sound bar moving when you are recording. Maybe you mic is muted. Check to make sure it's not muted also.

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Related Solutions

#4
October 23, 2011 at 15:25:47

"Maybe you mic is muted. Check to make sure it's not muted also."

Update - apparently the following applies to XP and previous. In Vista and Windows 7 you must un-Mute the Mic volume control if you want to use a Mic.

The Mic is supposed to be Muted in your Windows Sound mixer settings when you're not using a program that can use a Mic, otherwise it's possible you would be hearing sound from the Mic when it was plugged in all the time the computer is running. That's been the default since Win 95.

Using a program that uses a Mic un-mutes it's volume control in your Windows Sound mixer settings. When you stop using a program that can use a Mic, it's Muted again.
.............

see Testing for an Audio signal etc. here:
http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/...

(Most things in Vista are the same in Windows 7)


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#5
October 24, 2011 at 13:26:35

The mic was muted. I un-muted it. That had the effect of making the mic play some feedback through the head phones if I ran my finger ove the mouthpiece. So I felt I was the right track.

However, when I ran the recording again, the audio files created had no sound. If I held the mic close to my mouth, I could hear the sound of my voice in my headphones but the audio files still had no sound.


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#6
October 24, 2011 at 15:32:08

"The mic was muted. I un-muted it. That had the effect of making the mic play some feedback through the head phones if I ran my finger ove the mouthpiece."

Update - apparently the following applies to XP and previous. In Vista and Windows 7 you must un-Mute the Mic volume control if you want to use a Mic.

As I said above, the Mic is supposed to be Muted in the Windows sound mixer settings when you're not using a program that can use a Mic - using a program that can use a Mic automatically un-mutes it there.
....

To eliminate the feedback, turn the volume down on the mic, or turn the volume down for your computer speakers on the speakers or in Windows if they're external speakers.

Some headsets have a volume control inline in the wiring - if your has that, try adjusting that. Some have an on/off switch in the wiring for the Mic.

Do you have more than one Mic ? If you do, Windows can only use one of them at a time.
E.g. if you have a webcam connected it often also has a Mic.

See Response 6 in this
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

starting at

" Make sure you don't have volumes set too low or muted, for things you want to hear or use.... "

Note that the sound is Muted if the blue speaker icon has a red circle icon with a diagonal bar.

If you have more than one Mic, you can change which one Windows uses by default in those settings - Input devices - there will be more than one Mic listed. The one with the large checkmark is the one presently set to be the default device. To change that, RIGHT click on another Mic, set it to be the default one.
.....

If that doesn't help see the info at the link I pointed to in response 4.

If that doesn't help either,
- do you have more than one sound adapter ?
E.g. you DO if you're using a USB sound adapter or a PCI sound card in a mboard slot and also have a sound adapter built into the mboard (unless it's been disabled in the mboard's bios Setup). The drivers/associated software must have been installed for all sound adapters you want the option of using - the device youi nstalled those for last becomes the default sound adapter Windows uses. .
If you do, Windows can only use one of them at a time.
In the Sound settings I pointed to above -
you can change which one Windows uses by default in those settings - Output devices - more than one sound adapter will be listed -
there will be more than one sound adapter listed. The one with the large checkmark is the one presently set to be the default device. To change that, RIGHT click on another sound adapter, set it to be the default one.

- all sound chipsets work best when the Mic has an impedence (resistance to an AC signal) within a small range - your headset may have a Mic that has an impedence that is too far from that range - you may need to get a headset or Mic with a different impedence.


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#7
October 25, 2011 at 12:06:54

Thanks for the reply.

Using the mic did not automatically un-mute it. I had to manually un-mute it.

When I referred to feedback, I wasn't referring to something that I wasn't trying to eliminate - I was just pointing out that when I un-muted the mic, I created feedback and initially, I thought that was a sign that I was on the right track to recording my voice. However, if I hold the mouthpice close to mouth and shout into it while trying to voice, while I create feedback in doing so, the audio files created are blank.

I have just one mic and I have followed the procedure referred to in Response 4.

And I made the checks referred to In Response 6 of the other post but the audio files I create by trying to record my own voice are still blank.

The headset has a on/off switch and is switched on because a red light is displayed on the mouthpiece. It also has a volume control and I have raised the volume several notches but to no avail

I don't believe that I have more than one sound adapter but I'm not certain. How do I check?

Another way of looking at this problem is the fact that any mp3 files I play are played through my speakers. How do I tell the PC to play the music through my headphones. If I can do that, I may discover why I can't currently record my voice.


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#8
October 25, 2011 at 19:19:08

RIGHT click on the speaker icon in your task bar.
Select Recording Devices (goes to Sound window - Recording tab)

There should be at least one Mic listed that says Working below it

There should be at least one Mic listed that has a checkmark indicating it's the default device

(In my case I have a desktop computer that has a Mic port in the back on the mboard, and if the wiring from the mboard is connected to it properly, another Mic port on the front of the case is available, so I have two Mics listed, only one of which is shown to be working when I have one Mic plugged in. I do not have a webcam connected that has a built in Mic.)

If there is only one Mic with Working below it and it has the checkmark,
RIGHT click on it.
Properties
Levels tab

If you want to use the Mic, if there is a red circle with a diagonal line beside the blue speaker icon, the volume is Muted - apparently Vista and Windows 7 have a different situation in the Windows sound mixer settings than XP and previous Windows versions do - it must be clicked on to remove the red circle to un-Mute the volume.

Make sure the Mic volume control is at least half way.

If there is Mic Boost volume control, depending on the impedence of, and the max
output of, your Mic, you may need to have that at least half way too.
......

Start button - All Programs - Accessories - Sound Recorder.

A small Sound Recorder window should pop up - you should not get any error message.

If your Mic has an on/off switch on it, or inline in it's wiring, make sure it's on.
If your Mic has a volume control inline in it's wiring, make sure it's set, say, halfway.

Click on Start Recording and speak into your Mic.

In the grey box on the right of that window you should see a green bar graph that varies as you speak across a good portion of the grey box.

If you see that, the Mic volume, and Mic Boost volume if you have that, is sufficient.

(If you see no green bar, or if you do but it's just barely there, go back into your sound settings and increase the Mic Boost volume if you have that, or the Mic volume on both the Mic's wiring and in the sound settings if you don't.

If you do have Mic Boost if increasing it to the max does not allow you to make a reasonable recording in Sound Recorder, you need a headset with a Mic or a standalone Mic with a different impedence.

If you don't have the Mic Boost volume control, if increasing the Mic volume to
the max on both the Mic's wiring and in the sound settings does not allow you to make a reasonable recording in Sound Recorder, you need a headset with a Mic or a standalone Mic with a different impedence.)

Click Stop Recording.
Sound Recorder saves the recording as a *.wma file in your Documents folder by
default - save the file - note what it's name is.

Start button - Documents.

Find the *.wma file you saved.
Double click on it to Play it.
If you saw the green bar graph in Sound Recorder, you should hear the recording.


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#9
October 25, 2011 at 20:16:26

"I don't believe that I have more than one sound adapter but I'm not certain."

You have NOT mentioned whether you have a laptop or netbook, or a desktop computer.

If this is a laptop or netbook computer
- if you're not using a USB sound adapter, you have one onboard (built into the mboard) sound adapter.
- if you ARE using a USB sound adapter, you have two sound adapters - Windows can use only one of them at a time.

If this is a desktop computer, assuming it has a tower case
- if it has 1/8* ports for sound on the back of it up high where most of or all of the other ports ports are, that's your onboard (built into the mboard) sound adapter.

- if you have 1/8* ports for sound on a plate furher down on the back of your case in a slot space, that's your sound adapter that's on a removable card (sound card).

- if you have both of those, you have two sound adapters - Windows can use only one of them at a time.

- if you have a USB sound adapter as well, you have either two or three sound adapters - Windows can use only one of them at a time.
..............

".....the fact that any mp3 files I play are played through my speakers. How do I tell the PC to play the music through my headphones. "

If you have a laptop or netbook computer, the headphones jack has a mechanical switch inside of it that disables the built in speakers. You can't have sound from both at the same time.

If you have a desktop computer, if you get no sound in the headphones when your computer's speakers are producing sound
- you have the headphones in the wrong port
- or - you have the headphones in a front headphones port that is not wired properly to the mboard
or - you have the headphones in a front headphones port that is IS wired properly to the mboard but the sound drivers have not been installed properly
- or - the sound drivers have not been installed properly
- or - you need to change default configuration settings for the sound adapter.


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#10
October 26, 2011 at 04:48:16

Just a quick note to clarify that I have desktop PC with a tower case and the headset is connected via one of the USB ports. So should I disconnect the speakers before I attempt to listen with the headset?

I am not at that PC now. I shall try to implement your suggested solutions later when I'm at home.


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#11
October 26, 2011 at 07:15:48
✔ Best Answer

When the headset is connected via USB, obviously it's connecting to the sound adapter a different way, but otherwise the same things probably apply. You would need to disconnect the amplified speakers, or turn down their volume or switch them off on the speakers themselves, if you don't want what you hear in the headphones to be heard from the amplified speakers.
An exception to that MIGHT be it's possible configuration settings for the sound adapter MAY be able make the sound only come out of the headphones when you use the Mic, if you use non-default settings.

When you do have sound coming out of the amplified speakers, you can have feedback problems when you use a Mic. To eliminate the feedback, turn the volume down for the Mic, or turn the volume down for your computer speakers on the speakers themselves or in Windows, or change the position of the speakers so the front of them is facing a different direction.
.........

Your info so far seemed to indicate that if you were using Sound Recorder, if there was nothing else wrong, you didn't catch on to what grasshopper said in response 3 - "Make sure you see the sound bar moving when you are recording" - in Vista or Windows 7 (I'm assuming it's the same in Windows 7) you should see the green bar graph in Sound Recorder while you're recording - you probably weren't seeing that.

When I tried my own conventionally connected headset in Vista, I found I had to increase the Mic Boost volume control from it's minimum, otherwise the green bar graph barely showed up in Sound Recorder while making a recording.

When I found that, it occured to me you may not have clicked on the Levels tab and discovered you had that additional volume control and /or you may have found that and need to do that too.

I found Sound Recorder doesn't produce a usable recording (no green bar graph)
- if the Mic is Muted in the Windows Sound mixer settings and can't actually produce sound.
- if the Mic is plugged in but the Sound settings aren't detecting it as being plugged in (Working).

My headset Mic is not detected when I plug it into the front case Mic port for whatever reason, but it's detected fine when plugged into the Mic port on the back of the case.
Either I was missing some setting being Muted or disabled in my Sound settings, or I didn't connect the wiring for the front Mic port to the mboard correctly.
I'll figure that out eventually.

I'm dual booting XP and Vista.
In XP, which is what I use most of the time, when the Mic is Muted in the Windows sound mixer settings when you're not using a program that can use a Mic, it's automatically un-muted there when you use a program that can use a Mic. I know from previous experiences that the same applies to previous Windows versions back to and including Win 95.


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#12
November 8, 2011 at 12:21:21

Apologies for not getting back to you sooner.

I still could not to record my voice using the headphones. However, the date of the Internet conference came and went. So my need right now to use to get this working is not as great.

I still intend to get this working but right now, I need to prioritise other stuff.

Thank you for taking taking the time to provide me with such detailed information and suggestions. I really appreciate it.


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#13
November 8, 2011 at 15:26:39

Thanks for posting again and the thank you.

I can't make any further suggestions until you have provided further info about what I have already written. Answer ALL the questions, make comments about other things I said especially about what you're seeing.

If you don't want to do a lot of typing, simply select, copy, the text in my post that you want to answer or make a comment about, paste it into your post.


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