LG vs. Samsung Which monitor to buy

February 22, 2011 at 20:08:30
Specs: Vista Ultimate, SP1, 3.0Ghz,2Ghz
I am deciding which monitor to buy. The LG E2050t or the Samsung BX2231. Both use LED-backlight technology. I saw the LG in the store and the picture seemed washed out. I adjusted the settings to match the monitor next to it but it still looked washed out. The Samsung seems to have a better warmer color. I read that the DVI to HDMI connection on the Samsung is somewhat problematic; is this true? I originally was looking for a 20" but then I decided I'd go with a 22" to get a higher resolution.

See More: LG vs. Samsung Which monitor to buy

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#1
February 22, 2011 at 20:41:10
"I read that the DVI to HDMI connection on the Samsung is somewhat problematic"

Not sure what you mean by that. The Samsung has one VGA & two HDMI, so the only "DVI to HDMI connection" would be the cable. Other than that, you've already proved to yourself that the Samsung has the better picture.


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#2
February 22, 2011 at 20:50:11
You've got the right idea. What's most important is which one looks better to you.If you can see the models displaying the same display in a store near each other that's the best way to compare them.

"I read that the DVI to HDMI connection on the Samsung is somewhat problematic; is this true?"

I've found the few Samsung LCD models I've been exposed over the long term to be excellent.

There's lots of incorrect info on the web. Don't rely on info from only one source.
If you find many mentions of the same problem, then there IS a problem.

Some web sites such as Newegg or TigerDirect have lots of user reviews along with the ad that you can read, but keep in mind people who have problems are more likely to make a review post than people who have no problems, and some people think their problem is caused by the product being defective when it's actually caused by something else or something they did to damage the product .

Longer distances between HDMI connections may require a different connection method rather than merely a HDMI cable. E.g. a short HDMI cable to an adapter, a network cable, an adapter to a short HDMI cable.


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#3
February 23, 2011 at 06:41:20
Thanks for your responses! This will help me make an informed decision.

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#4
February 23, 2011 at 06:53:39
I've has 2 Samsung lcd's and both are fine quality. Never had a problem with either.

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#5
February 24, 2011 at 19:20:40
I opted for the Samsung BX2231. I set the resolution, installed the driver and adjusted brightness and contrast. I need to play around with it a few more days before I feel entirely comfortable. I didn't mention before that I have a multiboot; when I first turned on the computer, I didn't see the OS selection screen. But that's before the driver was installed. I'm hoping I see the selection screen the next time I boot up. I don't know what this would have to do with the selection screen, but it may have to do with the fact that there was nothing displaying on the screen when I first turned it on and the time must have elapsed and entered the top level OS. This machine has 98, NT, 2000 and XP. Do you think the driver for this monitor will install under the older OSes too?

One other question: When shopping for a monitor, I didn't notice any with the screen coating. Are they still making monitors with matte and glossy screens?


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#6
February 24, 2011 at 20:29:54
"I set the resolution, installed the driver"

Set the resolution where? In Windows or on the monitor ? You don't need to do the latter.

Installing the monitor drivers from the CD that came with the monitor by using a program on it doesn't normally set Windows to use them.
RIGHT click on a blank part of the main desktop screen, choose Properties - Settings.
If it doesn't say Samsung xxxx monitor on xxxx video adapter, you still need to select the Samsung monitor drivers.

Installing specific drivers in normal mode in XP.

See response 9 here:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

Scroll down to...
"When you get to the desktop screen , RIGHT click on blank part of the main Desktop....
......

"I didn't mention before that I have a multiboot; when I first turned on the computer, I didn't see the OS selection screen. But that's before the driver was installed."

Huh ?

If you have two monitors connected you probably won't get any video from the second one until you enable it's display in Windows, but other than that you should see the multiboot menu on the primary monitor.

What are you using to multiboot with ? XP's built in support or a third party boot manager program ?
XP doesn't load specific video drivers from the hard drive until Windows starts to load - AFTER you select XP as the operating system - previous to that the display is using the plain VGA video support built into all video adapters.The same applies to 98, 2000, and probably NT, and a third party boot manager program

"This machine has 98, NT, 2000 and XP. Do you think the driver for this monitor will install under the older OSes too?"

The monitor "drivers" are merely *.inf files - information files - that inform the operating about the settings the monitor is capable of, at least they are for 95, 98, 98SE, ME, 2000, and XP . As far as I know they are not operating system specific, at least not for those OSs.


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#7
February 26, 2011 at 14:27:38
I'm OK with the monitor driver. I am using multiboot function built in with XP, no third party. I still am not seeing the multiboot screen. The video signal seems to take a long time to get to the monitor! XP eventually loads but I never see the multiboot screen. The video card I'm using is from 2002/2003, ATI Radeon 7500. I don't see why replacing a CRT monitor with VGA cable with a LCD display with a DVI to HDMI cable would prevent one from seeing the POST messages and the multiboot screen! Do you think I should try the setup with the VGA cable to see if that makes a difference? Thanks.

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#8
February 26, 2011 at 15:09:43
"Do you think I should try the setup with the VGA cable to see if that makes a difference?"

Are you getting video fine on the monitor while booting BEFORE the hard drive starts to load Windows ?

Were you using a VGA connected monitor previously ?
If yes, in theory it's possible the multiboot screen doesn't show up if you use a DVI connected monitor, but I've never heard of that, you would think I would have heard of that problem by now on this web site.

If the Radeon 7500 card card two monitor ports, one port is primary, the other is secondary.The monitor may not display the multiboot screen or in Windows right away when a single monitor is connected to the secondary port.


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#9
February 26, 2011 at 19:01:32
I am not getting video BEFORE the hard drive starts to load Windows! Yes, I was using a VGA connected monitor previously.

"If yes, in theory it's possible the multiboot screen doesn't show up if you use a DVI connected monitor, but I've never heard of that, you would think I would have heard of that problem by now on this web site."

I never thought that there would be the remotest possibilty of such a problem. Any way, I am going to attach the VGA cable and see if I can see the POST/multiboot screens. I'm thinking I can boot up with VGA, then switch over to DVI. You see with this monitor, you can cycle thru the inputs. So, I guess there's nothing wrong with having the monitor being connected with a VGA AND a DVI cable. As long as you don't expect to see them both at once!


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#10
February 27, 2011 at 11:27:52
"I am not getting video BEFORE the hard drive starts to load Windows! "

You should ALWAYS have video while booting before data from the hard drive starts to load, unless
- possibly, the video card has two monitor ports and you have a single monitor plugged into the secondary port on the card
- there is a DVI connection scenario that produces no video that I'm not aware of
- the mboard is a newer one that has onboard video and supports hybrid video (both the video for specific video chipsets on a card and the onboard video enabled at the same time) and you're using a PCI-E X16 card that has a video chipset that is not supported by the hybid video feature (not possible for a Radeon 7500 card unless it's on a PCI-E x16 card). In that case the onboard video is NOT disabled by default bios Setup settings and the PCI-E X16 card will not produce video at all at any time until you change certain settings (one or two depending on the bios version) in the bios Setup.

If you DID have video before before data from the hard drive starts to load, I know from experience with my BootIt! NG (third party multiboot program used for booting Vista or XP) that if you boot using a OS CD or DVD, you can lose the multi-boot feature and have to reset it, in some circumstances.

" So, I guess there's nothing wrong with having the monitor being connected with a VGA AND a DVI cable. As long as you don't expect to see them both at once!"

You can't connect both types of connections to the video ports at the same time in most if not all cases - the monitor can support only one or the other connection type being connected at a time - see the monitor's manual.

I don't know if the video cable for the connection type you're not using must be connected or not - I would think that would not matter as long as both cables were not connected to video ports.


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#11
February 27, 2011 at 12:57:08
I tried with a VGA cable and I see the multiboot screen! I'll have to look into the video card manual to check about the DVI port. Maybe it's like you said: VGA, primary, DVI, secondary. Seems counter intuitive since DVI is the better connection. But as I said, this card is from the early 2000's. The only other thing I was thinking it could be is that this hybrid type cable (DVI to HDMI), takes long to sense video from the PC. With the VGA cable, the monitor wakes up instantly and displays POST messages before Windows boots. With the hybrid cable, the monitor is asleep until WIndows has booted and presents the log in screen. I have another computer with an HDMI to HDMI cable and I can see the POST messages just fine. So, I guess it's a function of either the card or the type of cable.

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#12
February 27, 2011 at 13:19:08
"The only other thing I was thinking it could be is that this hybrid type cable (DVI to HDMI),"

You didn't mention you were using a HDMI to DVI gender adapter or a HDMI to DVI adapter cable with the Radeon 7500 card DVI port previously.

Only fairly recent DVI ports / video chipsets are capable of displaying while booting when you use a HDMI to DVI gender adapter or a HDMI to DVI adapter cable.
If you are using a HDMI to DVI gender adapter or a HDMI to DVI adapter cable, I'm actually very surprised the the video works in Windows with the Radeon 7500 card.

By the way, I have a Radeon 7000 card on the computer I'm typing this on - a single VGA port, also composite (female RCA jack) TV-Out video.


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#13
March 1, 2011 at 07:13:45
I haven't looked at the video card manual yet but I think we're onto something here. As I said I'm using a DVI to HDMI adapter cable, from DVI output on the card to HDMI input on the monitor. (monitor has one VGA and two HDMI) Since it's not a recent video chipset like you said, it looks like that's why I do not see the POST messages when I boot up if I'm using that kind of cable. However, when I use a VGA cable the POST messages, etc. display with no problem. This leads me to the conclusion: Even if I decide to change monitors for one with a DVI input and no hybrid cable, I still will not see the POST messages! Am I right? At this point, it could be the card (primary vs. secondary output) or the adapter cable not working with an older chipset!? A look at the manual for the video card should make things clearer.

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#14
March 1, 2011 at 08:27:40
I don't think there is any point in looking at the manual for the video card.
HDMI did not exist as far as I know when the Radeon 7500 was first released.
DVI was a new thing back then.

I would think that if you connect via a DVI cable you should have video while booting, because as I've already said, I've never, ever, heard of a DVI connected monitor not producing video while booting.
.....

Side notes...

I have two Visiontek HD AIW cards, ( Radeon HD 3650 video adapter, analog/digital TV tuner, DVR using the hard drive, VIVO (Video In, Video Out), stereo audio in / out)
It has a DVI port that supports using a DVI to HDMI gender adapter.

The Asus M3A78 Pro mboard one of them is installed on has an onboard VGA and HDMI port - the mboard comes with a HDMI to DVI gender adapter.

But - we have nothing that I could plug a HDMI cable into.
......

I took a look at the Samsung pages for your BX2231, and the manual.

I'm impressed. It comes with all the cables you need for whatever type of video connection, and the manual is good.

"Best of all, you can connect your computer to different video ports (VGA, DVI, or an additional HDMI port) and switch back and forth without having to unplug anything. To switch between inputs, press the “Source” button on the monitor."

Manual - bottom of page 30 of pdf

DVI cable note page 45 of pdf


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#15
March 1, 2011 at 17:53:48
I looked at the manual and there is nothing which says the DVI port is primary or secondary. It only mentions primary and secondary when explaining dual monitors. This is not my case; I am using a single monitor. Anyway, the bottom line is, if I want DVI video and want to see POST messages I should get a monitor that has a DVI input on it, right? That way I have the same connection on both ends of the cable and there is no conversion going on. I talked to someone in my local electronics store (something I do as a last resort) and they said the reason I don't see the POST with the DVI to HDMI cable is because the POST messages are much lower resolution than WIndows. Thinking this over as I was going home I said to myself that's ridiculous! Why so I see POST messages on my other computer which has an HDMI to HDMI connection! Here are some links I came across while researching this:

http://www.evga.com/forums/tm.aspx?...

http://arstechnica.com/civis/viewto...

It's nice to know that I'm not the only one having an issue! I looked at ATI's website hoping to find an updated driver but the info is not presented too well. I was wondering if there was a driver update for the DVI to HDMI adapter cable issue.

Also, one last thing. This monitor cycles through all three inputs when you put it on. Once it senses a connection it stays on that input. I don't think I need to switch inputs manually, should I?

Thanks for your time helping me with this issue.


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#16
March 1, 2011 at 20:12:47
"I looked at the manual and there is nothing which says the DVI port is primary or secondary."

Does the 7500 card have two monitor ports?

If yes, one is primary, the other is secondary.

If it isn't clear which is which, just try connecting to the other one, if they're both DVI.
Note that if one is VGA, there is no such thing as a gender adapter that adapts a VGA port on a video adapter to a DVI connection - there are not enough connections in the VGA port.

That has nothing to do with which display Windows designates primary or secondary in Display Properties (XP and below) or Display Settings (Vista and Windows 7) - Windows always designates a single monitor connection as the primary display.

"Anyway, the bottom line is, if I want DVI video and want to see POST messages I should get a monitor that has a DVI input on it, right?"

Yours doesn't have that ? It isn't all that clear in the monitor manual. It shows all three types of connection cables.Maybe they come in configurations that either have a HDMI port or a DVI port ??.

If you did get one with a DVI port, it should work fine with a simple DVI to HDMI gender adapter for connecting to other things that have a DVI output.

On the other hand, I think a DVI monitor connection is just another thing that is HYPE - superior in theory but it doesn't much difference in the real world. I personally can't see that a DVI connection is noticeably superior to a VGA connection, for the same monitor.

"...they said the reason I don't see the POST with the DVI to HDMI cable is because the POST messages are much lower resolution than WIndows. Thinking this over as I was going home I said to myself that's ridiculous!"

I certainly agree with your conclusion.

"Here are some links I came across while researching this:"

Both those links are regarding NVidia video chipset cards. Yours is ATI / AMD.

Side notes....
The second one mentions he has Radeon HD 4200 inboard video.
He thought he was getting no POST. He was probably just getting no video.
Mboards with HD 4200 onboard video usually, if not always, have Hybrid Crossfire video support.
When you plug a card with one of a few specfic ATI video chipsets into the PXCI-E X16 slot, with default bios settings regarding the video, both the onboard video and the video chipset on the card in the slot output video at the same time.
When you plug a card that DOES NOT have one of a few specfic ATI video chipsets, or ANY NVidia video chipset, into the PXCI-E X16 slot, with default bios settings, the onboard video is NOT disabled,and card in the slot prouces no video at any time. You have to change one or two settings in the bios Setup, depending on the bios version, with the monitor connected to the onboard video. You have to disable the onboard video and enable the PCI-E X 16 slots video.
(You can't disable the onboard video by changing any setting in the bios if the mboard does not have Hybrid video support - it's installing a card in the PCI-E X16 or AGP slot that makes the bios disable the onboard video, not any setting.)

Hybrid Crossfire video was originally designed work only in Windows Vista or Windows 7, but later on ATI came up with drivers that work in XP (and probably 2000).

Some NVidia main chipsets with onboard video have Hybrid SLI support - it only works with certain specific NVidia video chipset cards.

Some Intel main chipsets with onboard video have Hybrid Multi-Monitor support - same thing - I'm not sure which video specific video chipset cards it works with - however, most of their drivers have not enabled Hybrid video support yet.
.....

"I looked at ATI's website hoping to find an updated driver but the info is not presented too well.I was wondering if there was a driver update for the DVI to HDMI adapter cable issue."

"This monitor cycles through all three inputs when you put it on. Once it senses a connection it stays on that input. I don't think I need to switch inputs manually, should I?"

I don't think it mentions that in the manual.
You certainly could try pressing that button that toggles the input source when you are using the HDMI to DVI cable.

The monitor DOES NOT need any drivers from the hard drive until Windows starts to load. All monitors, modern mboard bioses, and video chipsets support basic VGA mode. So does Windows before specific video drivers have been loaded for the video chipset.
It has to be hardware problem, not a software problem.


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#17
March 3, 2011 at 19:25:12
Didn't mention that my video card DVI port is a DVI-I. Will a DVI-D to DVI-D cable work with DVI-I? Will I see the POST messages? Thanks.

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#18
March 3, 2011 at 22:24:55
Digital Visual Interface
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digita...

Excerpts:

DVI is mostly compatible with HDMI. The main difference is that DVI typically carries no audio data in its TMDS channel, although increasingly, modern PC video hardware is providing audio (e.g., cards by NVIDIA[2] and ATI[3]), allowing the PC to send audiovisual data through a DVI cable to a high definition television with an HDMI input.

My note - SO - the problem is probably NOT due to this:

"Only fairly recent DVI ports / video chipsets are capable of displaying while booting when you use a HDMI to DVI gender adapter or a HDMI to DVI adapter cable."

DVI connectors - 6 types
(diagrams there)

The DVI connector on a device is therefore given one of three names, depending on which signals it implements:

* DVI-D (digital only)
* DVI-A (analog only)
* DVI-I (integrated - digital and analog)

My notes
- DVI-I ports on a video adaper work with a DVI to VGA adapter to produce a display on a VGA monitor. DVI-I ports are the type used on every video CARD I've come across.
- DVI-D ports - used on some mboards with ONBOARD video - DO NOT work with a DVI to VGA adapter to produce a display on a VGA monitor.

"Didn't mention that my video card DVI port is a DVI-I. Will a DVI-D to DVI-D cable work with DVI-I? Will I see the POST messages? Thanks."

Assuming you always get video while booting with a DVI connection which is probably the case, Yes. See next

The long flat pin on a DVI-I connector is wider than the same pin on a DVI-D connector, so it is not possible to connect a male DVI-I to a female DVI-D by removing the 4 analog pins. It is possible, however, to connect a male DVI-D cable to a female DVI-I connector. Many flat panel LCD monitors have only the DVI-D connection so that a DVI-D male to DVI-D male cable will suffice when connecting the monitor to a computer's DVI-I female connector.

While DVI is pin-compatible with HDMI, the DVI specification does not specifically support audio, while the HDMI specification does. This might create an audio hardware limitation for people who want to connect their desktop computer (which typically uses DVI) to an LCD or plasma monitor (which may only have HDMI inputs).
.........

"monitor has one VGA and two HDMI"

Apparently according to the manual for your model, there ARE configurations of your model that have a DVI port.



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#19
March 4, 2011 at 09:28:41
"It is possible, however, to connect a male DVI-D cable to a female DVI-I connector. Many flat panel LCD monitors have only the DVI-D connection so that a DVI-D male to DVI-D male cable will suffice when connecting the monitor to a computer's DVI-I female connector."

This is the info I am looking for. I am going to start looking for a monitor with DVI and VGA inputs and a glossy non-glare screen. I like the non-glare coating because it makes the colors more deep and vibrant. Thanks for your input and advice!


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#20
March 4, 2011 at 10:28:15
Thanks for the thanks.

When I was looking at LCD monitors and combo LCD TV / monitors about five and four years ago I found that

- they are no longer making the screens with the softer more easily damaged surface.They're all easy to clean without damaging them.

- the LCD combo TV / monitors (all modern LCD and Plasma TVs have monitor input ports) in smaller screen sizes work with a computer in monitor mode almost as well as a computer monitor and they cost only a little more for the same screen size for the smaller sizes. I bought a 19" Samsung model for a disabled friend about 4 years ago, who I frequently visited and helped with her computers since then, and was impressed with the result of using it in monitor mode.

If you like the idea of a large monitor, there are some Plasma combo TV / monitors in the smaller screen sizes, e.g. Samsung 32", that are relatively cheap recently (for a display of that size) and the appearance of moving video in video and games is vastly superior to that of any LCD display (600hz refresh rate rather 60, 120, or max 240Hz for an LCD display) and in theory a plasma display has a much longer useful life than any conventional LCD display that uses backlights (CCFLs - Cold Cathode Florescent Lamps - they burn out eventually).

LCD LED displays in theory have a much longer useful life than any conventional LCD display too - they use white leds behind the liquid crystal display for the source of light - I don't recall every seeing an led that has burnt out when it had a stable voltage applied to it - but they cost more, they may only be available for TVs, and they still have the inferior refresh rates vs. plasma displays..


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#21
March 5, 2011 at 19:23:27
LG and HP make 23' monitors with the non-glare coating. The LED technology in computer monitors is new; HP, Samsung and LG starting putting them out late last year. They consume about half the energy that the CCFL backlights do.

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#22
March 6, 2011 at 07:18:25
HP (and Dell, and most other brand name system named) monitors are re-branded monitors made by some major monitor manufacturer.
LG has probably been making monitors longer than most brands.
LG = Lucky Goldstar, formerly known as Goldstar.

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