Solved Lab-top is still a correct term

May 18, 2013 at 04:59:15
Specs: Androit
It was originally a lab-top, where scientists would move portable computers from Lab station (work area) to lab station. The term has become a bit archaic, but I use it.

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✔ Best Answer
May 23, 2013 at 03:47:50
The first Lab-top, laptops was mid 70's.

Since the first IBM compatible PC didn't come out till 1981, it would be difficult to find a lap top in the 1970s. The term lap top wasn't coined until 1983.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laptop

The very first portable computer was the IBN 5100, But look at the price! $8,975 minimum and weighing in at 24kgs it was certainly no lap top and probably needed a mains power supply.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_5100

The very first consumer portable computer, that is one that could be carried around and set up anywhere and didn't cost a small fortune, was the Osborne 1, also 1981.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osborne_1

It was so heavy the last place you would think of putting it was on your lap. The term lap tap didn't emerge much later until portable computers became light enough to sit on your lap.

In the 1970s anything that didn't need a whole room to itself was so basic that they were considered little more than expensive toys, like the Commodore Pet and Tandy TRS-80, both late 1970s.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRS-80
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commod...

Just to give you an indication of how easy it is for the uninitiated to get confused, I used to think that the RS in RS232 stood for Radio Shack. I found out different when I discovered that the IBM PC also had an RS 232 Interface.

What you would have had in the 1970s is a dumb terminal sitting on a bench top connected to a mainframe or mini computer elsewhere with a team of computer operators to look after it. Here is an example of computer technology from the Mid 1970s:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altair...

This was the first computer aimed at the consumer which some guy called Bill Gates wrote a BASIC Interpreter while he was still in collage. I doubt very much if it was ever used as a serious research tool in a laboratory. At that time any decent computer would have cost many thousands of dollars.

So now who is showing their ignorance. None of the links I posted mention lab-top, let alone lap-top. I know this because I was around in the 1970s and cut my teeth on a TRS-80. The fact that the only reference that can be found for lab-top is in the urban dictionary is a pretty good indication that it was never a recognised term with the computer field.

Lab-top is a term I have only come across recently, years rather than decades. Besides being grammatically unsound, it was probably coined by people who have never seen the inside of a laboratory in their life.

It almost certainly came about by people making the same mistake as Justin Bieber did with the "sixteenth" chapel.

Stuart



#1
May 18, 2013 at 05:57:18
http://www.urbandictionary.com/defi...

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#2
May 18, 2013 at 05:57:50
"Lab-top is still a correct term"

Is not, was not, never will be....

http://www.urbandictionary.com/defi...

http://www.urbandictionary.com/defi...

EDIT: guapo beat me by 32 secs


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#3
May 18, 2013 at 07:22:02
Since lab is an abbreviation for laboratory; a building where scientific researches is done, I can see the word being applied to a type of computer, unless the scientists did their work on the roof of the laboratory.

Bench-top or or table-top perhaps, but not lab-top. By the time scientists got round to using portable computers the term lap-top would have been well established

Stuart


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Related Solutions

#4
May 18, 2013 at 11:12:48
Perhaps its time.

http://geekdictionary.computing.net...

:-),

:: mike


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#5
May 18, 2013 at 13:38:48
I too have never heard of 'labtop' being a legitimate term for a portable computer. If it ever was it never was widely used that way. Seems more likely that 'labtop' is a corruption of 'laptop'.

But then again, thanks to Justin Bieber we now know that Michelangelo actually painted the 'sixteenth' chapel so I guess I could be wrong. This is all too confusing. I think I'll get a pop from the icebox and sit on the davenport and listen to my transistor radio.

DAVEINCAPS - Made with REAL high fructose corn syrup.


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#6
May 18, 2013 at 15:59:05
I will never say labtop, for any reason. The rest of you can say whatever you want.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#7
May 19, 2013 at 12:46:03
I used to say labtop, when i was a kid but nowadays i rarely hear anyone saying that its definitely laptop and always will be Laptop i mean the browser already has the previous labtop i wrote underlined in red, and has laptop as a correct word.

computers are a second home
NVIDIA GeForce


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#8
May 19, 2013 at 18:33:54
I'm done w/ this thread. Bye.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


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#9
May 23, 2013 at 01:31:30
Not a credible source.

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#10
May 23, 2013 at 01:37:32
They are called lab stations.The first Lab-top, laptops was mid 70's. They were first used in labs. Why don't you broaden your research instead of embracing ignorance like the two who got their info from urban dictionary?

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#11
May 23, 2013 at 03:47:50
✔ Best Answer
The first Lab-top, laptops was mid 70's.

Since the first IBM compatible PC didn't come out till 1981, it would be difficult to find a lap top in the 1970s. The term lap top wasn't coined until 1983.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laptop

The very first portable computer was the IBN 5100, But look at the price! $8,975 minimum and weighing in at 24kgs it was certainly no lap top and probably needed a mains power supply.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_5100

The very first consumer portable computer, that is one that could be carried around and set up anywhere and didn't cost a small fortune, was the Osborne 1, also 1981.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osborne_1

It was so heavy the last place you would think of putting it was on your lap. The term lap tap didn't emerge much later until portable computers became light enough to sit on your lap.

In the 1970s anything that didn't need a whole room to itself was so basic that they were considered little more than expensive toys, like the Commodore Pet and Tandy TRS-80, both late 1970s.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRS-80
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commod...

Just to give you an indication of how easy it is for the uninitiated to get confused, I used to think that the RS in RS232 stood for Radio Shack. I found out different when I discovered that the IBM PC also had an RS 232 Interface.

What you would have had in the 1970s is a dumb terminal sitting on a bench top connected to a mainframe or mini computer elsewhere with a team of computer operators to look after it. Here is an example of computer technology from the Mid 1970s:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altair...

This was the first computer aimed at the consumer which some guy called Bill Gates wrote a BASIC Interpreter while he was still in collage. I doubt very much if it was ever used as a serious research tool in a laboratory. At that time any decent computer would have cost many thousands of dollars.

So now who is showing their ignorance. None of the links I posted mention lab-top, let alone lap-top. I know this because I was around in the 1970s and cut my teeth on a TRS-80. The fact that the only reference that can be found for lab-top is in the urban dictionary is a pretty good indication that it was never a recognised term with the computer field.

Lab-top is a term I have only come across recently, years rather than decades. Besides being grammatically unsound, it was probably coined by people who have never seen the inside of a laboratory in their life.

It almost certainly came about by people making the same mistake as Justin Bieber did with the "sixteenth" chapel.

Stuart


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