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Is there a problem with my hard disk?

December 8, 2010 at 02:30:41
Specs: Windows 7, 2.793 GHz / 1006 MB

Hi,
I have an Intel Pentium 4 2.80 GHz with 1 GB RAM, Intel pro CT 100/1000 Ethernet and 80 GB (Maxtor 4R080L0 ATA Device) Hard Drive. I am using Windows 7 Ultimate (32-bit) OS.
My Problem is that i am experiencing slow boot up of Windows and slow HDD Read/Write operations. I ran a disk check and it was reporting that there are bad sectors in my C: and D: partitions, and the next day, Windows was also reporting that it detected a hard disk problem and that the disk is failing, although the PC is working fine and I can boot into Windows without any problems (but with slow speed).
As mentioned above, I have a Maxtor hard drive. What can I do to remove these bad sectors without loosing any of my data? I don't have any other ways to backup my data!
Please help. Thanks.

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#1
December 8, 2010 at 03:23:36

http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/

Download the ISO and burn a bootable CD. Boot up and select HDD diagnostics. There is one for Maxtor drives. Run the diagnostic tests. It sounds very much like your drive is failing however and you need to face the prospect of having to replace the drive.
You can get the stand-alone Maxtor tool here:
http://www.download3k.com/System-Ut...
I believe you need to run the download with a blank formatted floppy as it creates a bootdisk that you then use to run the diagnostics.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#2
December 8, 2010 at 05:45:08

I recommend you backup your personal data ASAP.

Your header indicates you may have a Gateway computer. If that is the case and you have not created a restore set I suggest you do so ASAP.

Believe what you are being warned of, your hard drive is failing. After you do the above two things then you can perform a drive fitness test.


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#3
December 23, 2010 at 01:11:26

Sorry for the late replies! But I Haven't got any way to backup my data. There's one thing I would like to ask that "Does defragmenting C: drive solves the problem?" If yes then how would that happen? and also tell me the causes, prevention and introduction of bad clusters.

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Related Solutions

#4
December 23, 2010 at 05:02:58

Don't you have a DVD writer drive in your computer?

Do you have a factory restore set of disks?

What is the make and model of your computer?


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#5
December 23, 2010 at 05:33:06

I and also tell me the causes, prevention and introduction of bad clusters

Old age. It happens to every hard disk eventually unless something else happens first.

No way to prevent it any more than you can prevent death. Everyone is going to die eventually, so are hard disks.

That is why people who know about these things always do backups. It can happen suddenly, or it can happen slowly, but it will happen.

De-fragmentation will do nothing to solve the problem at all, might even make it worse. Might just push the disk over the edge into oblivion. So until you have saved your data, forget about de-fragging

Stuart


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#6
December 24, 2010 at 06:59:12

@OtheHill: My computer's make and model are "BUYMPC D865GLC" which has an Intel 865G chipset and Pentium 4 (with HT) 2.80 GHz processor and Intel pro CT 100/1000 Ethernet connection, and my OS is Windows 7 Ultimate (32-bit). I Don't have a DVD writer, but i got a combo drive (DVD/CD-RW drive). and I don't have a factory restore set of disks either!

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#7
December 24, 2010 at 07:35:25

External hard drives are fairly cheap these days. How much data do you need to back up ?

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#8
December 24, 2010 at 09:12:26

You can back up your personal files on CDR. Will just take more of them. If you didn't get any restore CDs with your computer you may be able to make them now. First backup irreplaceable files like photos, etc.

You are currently using Windows 7. If you don't care about the original OS then don't worry about making restore CDs. If you used an upgrade version of Windows 7 then you WILL need the restore CDs.


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#9
January 1, 2011 at 10:10:50

Sorry for the late replies! I don't want to replace my hard drive and fix this one instead. I have recently ran a disk check on C: partition and it says "64 KB in bad sectors", it means there are a very few of bad clusters in my hard disk, right?

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#10
January 1, 2011 at 10:19:30

Not necessarily. Modern hard drives have spare unused clusters when they are new. As clusters become bad the drive will automatically mark them as bad and skip them while using some of the previously unused clusters.

Be the time you get the message you are getting all the unused clusters are in service. It is possible that clusters marked as bad can be repaired but not a given. You still need to backup your personal data before doing anything.

You should be saving at least two copies of your personal files all the time. One copy is gambling with your data. All hardware eventually fails. Can also be stolen, burned, flooded, etc.

You posta is not clear if you ran the drive fitness tool from the manufacturer or not. If not, I recommend that you do.


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#11
January 2, 2011 at 00:24:34

Where I can get the drive fitness test tool for maxtor drives?

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#12
January 2, 2011 at 00:54:56

See response # 1

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#13
January 2, 2011 at 05:37:23

http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.j...

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#14
January 26, 2011 at 10:11:57

As you said before in your post #2, that this is a "Gateway computer", this is not true. I bought it instead of a Dell PC because the shopkeeper was telling me that it supports various types of component expansions like RAM, Hard Disk, New Interface Connections, increase CPU clock rate etc. that's why I bought it and I use it for home use. And other thing I would like to ask that does reducing the sizes of my partitions remove all those bad sectors/clusters?

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#15
January 26, 2011 at 12:12:40

And other thing I would like to ask that does reducing the sizes of my partitions remove all those bad sectors/clusters?

That depends exactly where on the hard disk the bad clusters are otherwise they will just appear in a different partition.

If you knew exactly where on the hard disk these bad clusters are it is possible to organize the partitions so that the bad clusters are by-passed. But that requires an intimate knowledge of how partitions are created on a hard and means manually manipulating the Master Boot record.

You need a new hard disk as the problem will only get worse until one day you will not be able to boot at all.

Stuart


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#16
January 26, 2011 at 14:16:03

I have a Hitachi HDD which had bad sectors. Hitachi's drive utility has apparently repaired the bad sectors, though I'm not sure if that will last that long. So you might have the same success with your HDD.

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#17
January 26, 2011 at 14:36:38

What the repair utility has done is remap the bad sectors to the space on the hard disk reserved for that purpose. Once that space is full, no further repair is possible.

The only other way to repair bad sectors is to reformat the drive and hope the formatting utility marks the bad sectors as bad so that they are not used. This is only a stop gap as once bad sectors start appearing then you are on the downward slope to complete failure.

Stuart


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#18
January 30, 2011 at 07:00:45

Hi,
Yesterday I downloaded and ran a software named "HDD Regenerator 2011" and it detected "delays" instead of "bad clusters". So, I think that bad clusters aren't the problem with my disk, the problem is "delays". Please tell me more about delays and how to prevent and fix them?

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#19
January 30, 2011 at 07:03:07

And one more thing that my system starts and works slower than normal. And I think its because of delays, Am I right?

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#20
January 30, 2011 at 07:20:07

Delays can be caused by bad clusters as the disk repeatedly tries to re-read the bad cluster. Delays can also be cased by a worn disk spindle which causes the rotational speed to fluctuate causing more delays as data is re-read.

Either way, the disk in on its last legs and will fail very soon.

Stuart


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