Solved Imminent secondary Hard Drive Failure Causing

October 25, 2011 at 13:24:37
Specs: Windows XP Home SP3, 2.19GHz, 2.25 GB RAM
Issue:
Secondary hard drive on a desktop computer reported "cyclic redundancy data error". Chkdsk was run, took too long for satisfactory completion, and thusly canceled. On bootup, the machine reports imminent hard drive failure on secondary hard drive. Various tests run and observation indicate no errors or file corruption.

Blue screen when running seemingly normal operation. Programs running: The Sims 3 Pets.

"PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA
*** STOP: 0x00000050 (0xA3B5CF64,0x00000000,0x80537834,0x00000000)
Hitachi HDT721010SLA360 ST60A31B"

CheckDisk run again to be sure, took a time frame of days in order to finish. Desktop still reports imminent hard drive failure requiring input to continue start up. Entire computer experiences slowdown now, particularly when accessing the secondary hard drive. No physical damage to secondary hard drive. No physical damage to secondary hard drive.

The secondary hard drive is not the one with the OS installed on it and is solely used for data storage.

System specifications:
Hardware: Compaq Presario SR1750NX Desktop PC
OS: Windows XP Home SP3
CPU: AMD Athlon 64 3500+
Memory: 2.19GHz, 2.25 GB RAM
Mainboard: ASUSTek Computer INC. Amberine M 1.03
Graphics: ATI Radeon HD 3400 Series RV620
Secondary Hard Drive: Hitachi HDT721010SLA360 ST60A31B
Space: 931GB NTFS


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✔ Best Answer
October 25, 2011 at 15:01:26
"cyclic redundancy data error"

that seems pretty clear to me.



#1
October 25, 2011 at 13:48:30
The message is warning you that disk failure is imminent. These errors cannot be repaired by chkdsk or any other utility. You need to backup all important data on that drive ASAP as you may not have much time. Then you can replace the drive.

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#2
October 25, 2011 at 13:58:55
I can't replace the drive. That costs money. There's no reason or clear evidence aside from slow-down that there is anything wrong with the drive. There can be no physical damage to the drive as nobody uses percussive maintenance on this machine. Would you rather suggest I reformat the hard drive instead?

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#3
October 25, 2011 at 14:04:39
It sounds like you are getting SMART messages telling you the drive is about to fail. Nothing you can do about that. If you can't afford to replace it you'll have to do without it. Whatever, get any important data off it right now.

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Related Solutions

#4
October 25, 2011 at 14:14:18
The SMART tests in the bios indicated there were no errors. I'm not going to give up and take the sucker's way out.

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#5
October 25, 2011 at 14:26:38
OK. Format the drive and see what happens. But make sure you keep good backups of any data you put on it.

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#6
October 25, 2011 at 14:49:03
Thankfully all the data can be easily replaced. Thank you! :)

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#7
October 25, 2011 at 15:01:26
✔ Best Answer
"cyclic redundancy data error"

that seems pretty clear to me.


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#8
October 25, 2011 at 18:35:02
If the "imminent hard drive failure" comes before the OS starts loading then it would seem to be a physical problem with the hard drive that a format wouldn't cure.

If you're worried about replacement cost, could it still be under warranty? Or you may be able to find something compatible on ebay.

Oh yeah, check that the drive data cable is in good condition and tightly connected on both ends.


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#9
October 25, 2011 at 19:05:34
But the hard drive has been fine for years up until this point without having its cables fiddled let alone touched with in months.

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#10
October 25, 2011 at 20:29:34
It is unfortunate, but hard drives can, and often do, fail without warning or apparent cause. In this case there is considerable reason to believe that the drive has physical errors that cannot be repaired. You can try to do a format but I wouldn't hold out much hope.

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#11
October 25, 2011 at 23:32:55
I agree that a format isn't going to fix the drive. the message is a classic SMART one, and the drive is going to fail. But, if the OP thinks a format will fix it there's only one way to find out.

Drives fail; some people don't understand that.


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#12
October 25, 2011 at 23:55:24
Well you're free to buy me a new TB drive as you have no problem with just throwing things away when electronically they may be defective but physically there is no permanent issue.

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#13
October 26, 2011 at 01:04:28
I'm not going to argue with you any further, but if you think there is nothing wrong with the drive then why do you suppose it is reporting errors to you?

Buy your own replacement hardware, and please don't come back in a few days asking how you can recover files from a dead hard disk.


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#14
October 26, 2011 at 01:38:32
I thought you said you weren't going to argue? Anyways, staying with the matter on hand, an update:


CheckDisk run again to be sure, took a time frame of days in order to finish. Desktop still reports imminent hard drive failure requiring input to continue start up. Entire computer experiences slowdown. Reformatting the secondary hard drive fixed the speed issues, however another Blue screen occurred when attempting shut down, despite this repair.

*** STOP: 0x0000008E (0xC0000005,0x00B54D80,0xBA50BB7C,0x00000000)

The false positive "imminent hard drive failure" message on bootup still persists. No physical damage to secondary hard drive. The secondary hard drive is not the one with the OS installed on it and is solely used for data storage.

Remember, this is an issue with a drive overestimating a cyclic redundancy data error then believing it is now corrupted. With only mere data being altered, a simple format should have fixed this issue, yet it hasn't. ChkDsk should have fixed this issue, but it hasn't either.


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#15
October 26, 2011 at 19:38:51
Vibration and heat and its proximity to any abrasive surface can affect the drive cable condition and connection. You don't necessarily have to open the case and fiddle around inside to cause a problem with the cable.

Most drive manufacturers provide a diagnostic to check drive fitness. That should tell you with certainty the drive's condition. Check the support page for your model.

And if it's bad, it's bad. Positive vibes or not giving up or the fact you can't afford a new one can't change that.

Did you check to see if it was still under warranty?


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