IH252 25-inch Class Widescreen LCD Monitor not working

February 16, 2015 at 12:36:21
Specs: Windows 7
Hello everyone,

I have a IH252 monitor sitting around doing nothing because of a little problem I am having. I turn the monitor on, it works for a few seconds, then it just goes black. When it turns on it is really bright at the top and goes into a gradient untill it is dark near the bottom. I did some research and I took a bright Torch/light to it and couldn't see anything in the background. I opened it up and make sure everything was plugged in properly and non of the capacitor look blown. I plugged it into a VGA port and a HDMI port and the same result. I would love some help because if this is a $10 fix then I can just go back to my triple moniter setup. Thank you in advanced for anyone who helps out!!


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#1
February 16, 2015 at 12:57:12
Unless you are experienced at diagnosing and fixing a monitor there is unlikely to be much you can do except what you have done already. Most likely it is either something that has failed in screen driving circuitry or maybe even the screen itself. The problem is that it is tricky to even purchase parts other than very standard ones and buying stuff in the hope that it might fix it could well exceed you budget without a result. Keep watching here for ideas in case someone knows that particular symptom but I don't hold out too much luck.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
February 17, 2015 at 09:00:55
Google produced the link posted below. Use common sense with this issue but it appears there may be a common issue with that model.

http://www.amazon.com/Repair-I-INC-...


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#3
February 17, 2015 at 09:25:07
Well, if you read what I said then I already looked at the capacitors and they seemed fine. So buying this would be useless for me.

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Related Solutions

#4
February 18, 2015 at 11:11:25
"I already looked at the capacitors and they seemed fine"

A bad cap may swell, bulge, or leak, but that's not always the case.

http://www.electricaltechnology.org...

https://www.ifixit.com/Wiki/Trouble...


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#5
February 18, 2015 at 13:35:16
Sorry I should change that to "Checked" then. I have already done all that.

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#6
February 18, 2015 at 14:09:14
How did you check the capacitors?

Bear in mind that it's not just capacitors that can fail.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
February 18, 2015 at 14:15:44
I used a meter to check them out. I only checked the main ones though. Should I check every one with a meter? I looked at them and none were bulging either.

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#8
February 18, 2015 at 14:29:11
This is the problem I referred to originally. Unless you have a circuit diagram and can understand the workings then all you can do is haphazard testing and replacing items in the hope that you just happen to stumble on the culprit. It could be due to just about anything so it is tricky unless the fault is properly diagnosed.

For what it's worth the best way to check capacitors is with and analog multi-meter on the ohms range. By reversing the terminals you should see a kick on the meter pointer due to charging and discharging. What ohms range you use depends on the size of the capacitor (microfarads). Electrolytic capacitors can add to the confusion because you will get a steady reading in one direction and a higher resistance in the other direction - some experience helps. On the right ohms range you should still get a kick from the meter needle if they are working though.

If you use a digital meter all you get is a series of numbers rattling up and down - which are very hard to interpret. You said you checked the capacitors with a meter but exactly how did you determine they were good?

I've based the above on TV servicing which used to do in the past. Monitors are different obviously but the same broad principles still apply.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#9
February 18, 2015 at 14:33:16
Well, the thing i'm confused about is the gradient. It is nice and bright where up top, where I assume the lamp is, then it gets darker as it goes down then eventually it just goes black. Could this not indicate a bad lamp? Or am I totally wrong there. Also I just googled the normal rating for them and checked to make sure they were to standard.

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#10
February 18, 2015 at 14:39:51
If the lamp was faulty I would expect it to affect the whole of the screen.

Sounds like some sort of scanning fault but it's not a symptom I recognise (although in this area monitors and TV's differ a lot). This is something where a scope might be useful.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#11
February 18, 2015 at 14:48:26
A scope? I have basic knowledge in this area but I don't know a huge amount lol.

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#12
February 18, 2015 at 15:07:24
The way to repair anything is to first understand how it works and then, with the right tools, determine what isn't working and diagnose the fault. What I believe you are doing is called "poke and hope". Don't get me wrong, I have used the same approach when faced with electronic kit which I don't properly understand. On the odd occasion I have been lucky but mostly not.

With electronics we are well into the throw away society which is why you would be hard pressed to find anyone who repairs monitors and the like. Even if you find the culprit it could turn out to be a specialised component which you would be hard pressed to find anywhere on the internet.

All I can add is to look out for anything showing overheating or burn marks and check printed board soldering. Often the largest soldered joints give trouble first, sometimes seen by gently moving the component then watching the soldered joint below it to see if its centre is moving on it's own (detached from the surrounding solder).

Not a lot more I can add.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#13
February 18, 2015 at 15:35:49
One parting shot. Trying to find intermittent faults is one time when poking around can actually pay off. You tap around the board using some insulated object and watch the screen. If anything changes then you are probably onto it. If a bad joint is suspected, yet it is not immediately obvious, then run a small paint brush over the soldered side of the board (watching the screen for changes). This will sometimes help pin point where you should be looking - a magnifying glass then comes in useful.

Having said that, your issue seems to be a "solid" fault because at no time have you said the symptoms change or the monitor briefly works.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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