Solved I want to connect front usb to motherboard, and I don,t know

April 11, 2012 at 05:11:13
Specs: xp, 2,66 / 512 ram

how to connect front usb to motherboard . in which pin?
HP Compaq d 530

See More: I want to connect front usb to motherboard, and I don,t know

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✔ Best Answer
April 11, 2012 at 12:31:42

As I said above....
" .....usually the brand name system builder has NO info about what pin on the USB header(s) on the mboard are for what."
They seem to assume that anyone who buys a brand name system isn't going to need to know that.

Do you still have the original case, or can you still contact whoever has the case now ?

If yes, find out what the Product Number for the model is and tell us what that is !
See response 2 !

If you can't do that....

We MIGHT be able to find out who actually made the mboard (HP didn't), and find a similar mboard made by the same mboard manufacturer that we CAN find the info about the USB header(s) on the mboard for, if you can provide this info:

Look for a stuck on paper or plastic label on the surface of the mboard that has the HP part number for the mboard. It often has a bar code on it as well.
It MAY have HP's name for the mboard as well

Quote the number on it, and HP's name for the mboard if it's there.
e.g. 9 digits like so - xxxxxx-1xx

Otherwise, see the generic info about USB headers and one piece wiring connectors from the case for the USB ports in response 2, and the following.

Unfortunately, the way the pins on the USB header on the mboard are wired up to the mboard, and the way the wiring connectors from the case that are not individual wires, individual connectors are wired up, was never standardized.
However, more recent mboards often use one of only a few ways the USB headers can be wired up to the mboard,

Your generic case may have, for the front USB ports wiriing (the ones lower down on the front on a tower case)...

- a one piece connector for two USB ports, double row, 9 or 10 pin holes

This is a common wiring pattern but it may NOT be what your generic case has...
For each row, the +5v wire insulation is usually a color other than black on one end, often red or orange, the 4th wire (Ground for the +5v) and the 5fth wire if it has one are usually black. The two wires in between the +5v wire and the 4th wire are for data.
The two rows may have both +5v wires on the same end, more common, or on opposite ends, not so common.

Note that if the wires on the one piece connector are not in the right position for the pins on the header's uses, they can usually be easily extracted without damaging the connector or the metal ends on the wires and placed in other positions -- ask me how.

- two connectors,
- 4 wires, 4 pin holes X 2
- 4 wires, 5 pin holes X 2
- or - 5 wires, 5 pin holes on one connector; 4 wires, 4 pin holes on the other one
- or - 5 wires, 5 pin holes X 2

This is a common wiring pattern but it may NOT be what your generic case has...
The +5v wire insulation is usually a color other than black on one end, often red or orange, the 4th wire (Ground for the +5v) and the 5fth wire if it has one are usually black
The two wires in between the +5v wire and the 4th wire are for data

Note that if the wires on the one piece connector are not in the right position for the pins on the header's uses, they can usually be easily extracted without damaging the connector or the metal ends on the wires and placed in other positions, if you're careful about how you do that -- ask me how.


- individual wires, individual connectors -
- 4 of them for each USB port
- or - 5 of them for one port; 4 of them for the other
- or - 5 of them for each USB port
- they often have characters printed on the connectors
E.g. 5v_1, D+_1, D-_1, GND_1, another GND_1 or OC_1 if there's a fifth wire
Same thing for the second port
5v_2 etc
They may have V, VC, or VCC instead of 5v

Some generic cases have a label stuck to the inside of the case that tells you which wire is for what for the front USB port wiring.


.....

If there is a 5th wire or a fifth pin for a USB port, it's either for a second Ground (for the outer metal shell of the USB port), or for Over Current.
Whatever the use for the 5th pin is on the USB header on the mbord is, the use for the fifth wire from the case connector to the USB port MUST be the same. If those two things are for opposite uses, you may get an ERROR message regarding over current when the computer is booted that's generated by the mboard's bios even when there is nothing plugged into the mis-wired USB port,

The USB ports need only 4 wires connected to them to work, for +5v, Data +, Data -, and Ground for the +5v (the fourth wire in most cases).
If you get an error message like that, you need to NOT connect the fifth wire from the case to the fifth pin on the USB header, one way or another.
E.g. if you have 5 wires, 5 pin holes on one connector; 4 wires, 4 pin holes on the other one, and 9 pins on the USB header, install the 5 wire connector on the 4 pin side so the fifth wire is not connected, the 4 wire connector on the 5 pin side so it doesn't connect to the fifth pin



#1
April 11, 2012 at 06:33:24

You should be looking for a connector like this.

I was unable to find the motherboard you are using, so I don`t know the exact location of the USB connectors, but they should be near the edge of the MB and somewhere around the front panel connectors - (front LEDs and power button).

Google is your friend

www.google.com

-----------------------

Keyboard not present,press F1 to continue...


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#2
April 11, 2012 at 07:54:19

You have not provided enough information.

There is no such model as d 530

If it's d530, there are these two series of models...

HP Compaq d530 Small Form Factor Desktop PC
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsuppor...

and

HP Compaq d530 Ultra-slim Desktop Desktop PC
http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsuppor...


....and there may be more than one possible mboard for those.

If you are trying to connect the original mboard to the original case......


Go here:
http://partsurfer.hp.com/search.aspx
Scroll down a bit.
Look for the similar label on the outside of your computer.
The specific model number - that's at the end of the first line.
Quote the Product number - that's on the third line.

With that info we MIGHT be able to find out who actually made the mboard (HP didn't) and find you a similar mboard made by the same mboard manufacturer that we CAN find the info about the USB header(s) on the mboard for.
.....

If you are trying to connect the original mboard to the original case, in most cases the original brand name system case has a one piece connector for the wiring of the front USB ports that can only be plugged into a USB header on the mboard that has it's pins in the right places, one way.
There may be an external tab on the connector that needs to line up with a slot in the plastic shroud around the header, and/or there may be one blocked pin hole in the connector, that prevents you from plugging it in in the the wrong direction.
There may be printing on the mboard surface near the header - e.g. USB
(use good lighting and something to magnify what you see if you need to)

The USB header may have
- a double row of pins, 4 pins on each side
- a double row of pins, 4 pins on one side, a pin missing on that side, 5 pins on the other side
- if it's an older mboard, several other headers, arrangement of pins are possible.

If you are trying to connect the mboard to a generic case, usually the brand name system builder has NO info about what pin on the USB header(s) on the mboard are for what.


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#3
April 11, 2012 at 09:51:01

HP Compaq d530 Small Form Factor Desktop PC. It is not the original pc casing, it,s no name. I am interested in a view a diagram of mboard, but I don,t find something.
Thank you, anyway !

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Related Solutions

#4
April 11, 2012 at 12:31:42
✔ Best Answer

As I said above....
" .....usually the brand name system builder has NO info about what pin on the USB header(s) on the mboard are for what."
They seem to assume that anyone who buys a brand name system isn't going to need to know that.

Do you still have the original case, or can you still contact whoever has the case now ?

If yes, find out what the Product Number for the model is and tell us what that is !
See response 2 !

If you can't do that....

We MIGHT be able to find out who actually made the mboard (HP didn't), and find a similar mboard made by the same mboard manufacturer that we CAN find the info about the USB header(s) on the mboard for, if you can provide this info:

Look for a stuck on paper or plastic label on the surface of the mboard that has the HP part number for the mboard. It often has a bar code on it as well.
It MAY have HP's name for the mboard as well

Quote the number on it, and HP's name for the mboard if it's there.
e.g. 9 digits like so - xxxxxx-1xx

Otherwise, see the generic info about USB headers and one piece wiring connectors from the case for the USB ports in response 2, and the following.

Unfortunately, the way the pins on the USB header on the mboard are wired up to the mboard, and the way the wiring connectors from the case that are not individual wires, individual connectors are wired up, was never standardized.
However, more recent mboards often use one of only a few ways the USB headers can be wired up to the mboard,

Your generic case may have, for the front USB ports wiriing (the ones lower down on the front on a tower case)...

- a one piece connector for two USB ports, double row, 9 or 10 pin holes

This is a common wiring pattern but it may NOT be what your generic case has...
For each row, the +5v wire insulation is usually a color other than black on one end, often red or orange, the 4th wire (Ground for the +5v) and the 5fth wire if it has one are usually black. The two wires in between the +5v wire and the 4th wire are for data.
The two rows may have both +5v wires on the same end, more common, or on opposite ends, not so common.

Note that if the wires on the one piece connector are not in the right position for the pins on the header's uses, they can usually be easily extracted without damaging the connector or the metal ends on the wires and placed in other positions -- ask me how.

- two connectors,
- 4 wires, 4 pin holes X 2
- 4 wires, 5 pin holes X 2
- or - 5 wires, 5 pin holes on one connector; 4 wires, 4 pin holes on the other one
- or - 5 wires, 5 pin holes X 2

This is a common wiring pattern but it may NOT be what your generic case has...
The +5v wire insulation is usually a color other than black on one end, often red or orange, the 4th wire (Ground for the +5v) and the 5fth wire if it has one are usually black
The two wires in between the +5v wire and the 4th wire are for data

Note that if the wires on the one piece connector are not in the right position for the pins on the header's uses, they can usually be easily extracted without damaging the connector or the metal ends on the wires and placed in other positions, if you're careful about how you do that -- ask me how.


- individual wires, individual connectors -
- 4 of them for each USB port
- or - 5 of them for one port; 4 of them for the other
- or - 5 of them for each USB port
- they often have characters printed on the connectors
E.g. 5v_1, D+_1, D-_1, GND_1, another GND_1 or OC_1 if there's a fifth wire
Same thing for the second port
5v_2 etc
They may have V, VC, or VCC instead of 5v

Some generic cases have a label stuck to the inside of the case that tells you which wire is for what for the front USB port wiring.


.....

If there is a 5th wire or a fifth pin for a USB port, it's either for a second Ground (for the outer metal shell of the USB port), or for Over Current.
Whatever the use for the 5th pin is on the USB header on the mbord is, the use for the fifth wire from the case connector to the USB port MUST be the same. If those two things are for opposite uses, you may get an ERROR message regarding over current when the computer is booted that's generated by the mboard's bios even when there is nothing plugged into the mis-wired USB port,

The USB ports need only 4 wires connected to them to work, for +5v, Data +, Data -, and Ground for the +5v (the fourth wire in most cases).
If you get an error message like that, you need to NOT connect the fifth wire from the case to the fifth pin on the USB header, one way or another.
E.g. if you have 5 wires, 5 pin holes on one connector; 4 wires, 4 pin holes on the other one, and 9 pins on the USB header, install the 5 wire connector on the 4 pin side so the fifth wire is not connected, the 4 wire connector on the 5 pin side so it doesn't connect to the fifth pin


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