Solved How to recover data from a dead hard drive

Asus P5kpl-vm desktop board
February 4, 2011 at 12:11:47
Specs: Windows 7 Ultimate x64, C2D2.8GHZ/4GB
The computer do not detect the Seagate ST32122A IDE (PATA) 2.11 GB hard drive where I had stored some very important data a few years back, it was working fine when removed from the system but it remained inactive for more than three years, before removing it the drive was scanned and defragmented,

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#1
February 4, 2011 at 16:01:46
Hook it up as an external hdd, using an external sata/ide cable, and if your computer recognises it you'd be able to retrieve data.

I have the same problem but with older drives; some worked using this method, some didn't.

Hang on to it, you never know what they might come up with in the future.


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#2
February 4, 2011 at 18:30:32
✔ Best Answer
Hard drives do not go bad from just sitting un-used.
You probably have it jumpered wrong, or you connected the data cable to it backwards, or you have a problem with it's data cable.

Was it connected by itself to a data cable, or was there another drive on the same data cable ?

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittent, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.

80 wire data cables must have the proper end connector connected to the mboard IDE header - usually that's blue, but in any case it's the one farther from the middle connector on a 3 connector data cable.


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#3
February 4, 2011 at 19:44:29
Any chance of connecting it to the computer it was originally on?

The mantra of the aging hippie--"Power to the government, right on"


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#4
February 6, 2011 at 06:46:35
I have checked the cable and also the Jumper (Its in slave but I tried all three jumper slots) and also connected it to an External IDE Enclosure and to the System via usb but Windows says that device is not recognized but if I connect a DVD drive using the same enclosure it works fine. I am using Windows 7 but also tried on XP. The system the drive was orignally on worked on XP.

I have no chance of connecting it the system it was on. Its been a few years and I have thrown away the system. It was a P3 450Mhz with 10GB HDD and this 1 and 96MB RAM.

Any further help please.

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#5
February 6, 2011 at 07:20:07
The hard drive probably must be jumpered master when it's in the external enclosure.

Are you SURE the drive is spinning when you connect power to it and the computer is running ?

"ST32122A IDE (PATA) 2.11 GB"

Cylinders 1023
Heads 64
Sectors per track 63

Installation guide
http://www.seagate.com/support/disc...

Shows which pins for master - doesn't mention cable select

See page 14 - you may need to enter the drive's parameters manually
4092 - 16 - 63

Some newer bioses may not detect an old drive unless you do that.


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#6
February 7, 2011 at 10:42:05
The drive is jumpered in slave and how and I read the manual and tried entering the protocols but the drive is not recognized. It does spin when powered on.

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#7
February 7, 2011 at 11:54:30
The hard drive probably must be jumpered master when it's in the external enclosure.

If the drive is by itself on a data cable, jumper the drive Master, or jumper it Cable Select and have it on the END connector of a 3 connector data cable. Some bioses won't recognize the drive at all if you don't do that.

If there is another hard drive on the same data cable, some hard drives - e.g. many Western Digital models - have two ways they can be jumpered as Master - Master, single, or similar, for when the drive is on the cable by itself, or Master, with Slave or similar, for when the drive is on the data cable with another drive set to Slave.
That MUST be correct for the situation.

Don't mix Cable Select and Master / Slave jumpering for two drives on the same data cable. Some combos work, some DO NOT allow both drives to be recognized.

That drive does not have to be connected to an 80 wire data cable if no drive connected to the same data cable requires it be connected to an 80 wire one, but 80 wire data cables must have the proper end connector connected to the mboard IDE header - usually that's blue, but in any case it's the one farther from the middle connector on a 3 connector data cable.


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#8
February 8, 2011 at 01:33:46
Hey. It worked. Thanks Tubesandwires.

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#9
February 8, 2011 at 06:32:35
Success !
Thanks for the thanks.

What was it that was not right ?


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#10
February 9, 2011 at 09:01:03
That tiny jumper thing was the issue. I had a issue like this before and it just popped into my head so I tried another jumper I had in another hard drive and it worked the first time.

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#11
February 9, 2011 at 10:57:19
It appears that it uses standard sized jumpers - for pins spaced 1/10" apart.
Some older hard drives, and new SATA II hard drives, have even smaller jumpers.
If the jumper has been used at least several times, sometimes the metal inside can fall out while handling it, or can get fatigued and loose

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