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how to convert serial data to vga output

June 2, 2012 at 12:42:06
Specs: Windows 7

I am working as an Engineer at Bowling ally.There is a CRT monitors to display the score and some picture.The input to monitor is 9pin port and I want to replace this monitors with LCD or LED monitors. But these monitors 15 pin VGA port. how can I do this ....Please Help Please

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#1
June 2, 2012 at 13:49:09

Is this equipment back from the 80's? I don't think those are serial ports, I think those are old EGA video. To the best of my knowledge, serial was never used for video output but EGA video used a 9 pin connector that looked like a serial port. Can you post pictures of the ports?

PS, LCD & LED are the same thing, the LED just means its using LEDs for backilghts behind the LCD instead of cold cathode tube flourescent light.


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#2
June 2, 2012 at 14:55:16

As THX 1138 mentions, you need to determine exactly what type of video is coming to the monitors. There was 9-pin multi-sync VGA back in the earlier days, and adapters are available to handle the monitors to a 15-pin VGA Port (Note: these wouldn't work with EGA):

http://www.amazon.com/CABLES-HD15F-...

You appear to have 9-pin output, which could (as mentioned) be EGA, which would limit you to using EGA monitors. Finding those new would be difficult at best, but there apparently is a company (I have no ties to) which apparently produces them (or did):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kf2P...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#3
June 2, 2012 at 15:06:06

A 9 pin d-sub serial port is nearly always MALE - visible pins in the port.

A 9 "pin" d-sub video port is nearly always FEMALE - pin holes in the port - the opposite gender to what the connector on the end of the monitor's cable has.

9 "pin" d-sub video ports were used for
- a MDA or HGA mono display - (black and white, or amber, or green)
- a CGA display - 4 colors including white, or mono, 3 shades of grey and white
- an EGA display - 16 colors including white, or mono, 15 shades of grey and white
- the earliest VGA displays - color, 256 colors including white, or mono, 255 shades of grey and white

If the existing CRT monitors have MORE THAN 16 colors including white, or MORE THAN 15 shades of grey and white, then the display adapter is probably an early VGA adapter. You can buy a gender adapter to convert the port to be used with a 15 pin VGA monitor. (e.g. 9 pin d-sub male to 15 "pin" d-sub female.)

If they don't, if it's possible to change the display adapter's card, you need to change it to one that supports VGA video that has one or more 15 "pin" female port(s), that has the right type of contact arrangement on the bottom of the card - likely ISA, or a lot less likely, PCI.


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#4
June 7, 2012 at 10:36:46

I was checked the signal type after your coments and thank you for your coment. actualy ,this serial port is used as just a conector. only four wire is connected to the port.they are named as R,G,B ,E and V . so I think this signal type is RGB signals.So I want to replace this CRT monitors by LCD monitors . please tel me the methods please

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#5
June 7, 2012 at 14:17:29

If the present CRT monitors have....

"- a MDA or HGA mono display - (black and white, or amber, or green)"
or
"- a CGA display - 4 colors including white, or mono, 3 shades of grey and white"
or
"- an EGA display - 16 colors including white, or mono, 15 shades of grey and white"


... then you cannot connect the physical 9 "pin" d-sub probably female video port directly to a monitor that has a 15 pin d-sub connector, and get a display, no matter how many pins it has on the physical 9 "pin" d-sub port, even if you use a 9 pin (probably male) d-sub to 15 pin (female) d-sub gender adapter.

As I said above...

"....if it's possible to change the display adapter's card, you need to change it to one that supports VGA video that has one or more 15 "pin" female port(s), that has the right type of contact arrangement on the bottom of the card - likely ISA, or a lot less likely, PCI "

If it's not possible to change the display adapter's card, as in, a physical card that can be removed, then you cannot connect an LCD monitor to the 9 "pin" d-sub port any way I know of. You can only use a CRT monitor that is a type that is compatible with the type of video adapter.

LCD monitors that are MDA, HGA, CGA, or EGA compatible have never existed as far as I know.

MDA, HGA, CGA, and EGA display adapters all have a digital output.

VGA display adapter ports all have an analog output.

Newer video adapters on a removable card that have a DVI port are all wired up to support the DVI-I standard - they support both DVI (digital) output and VGA (analog)output - if the card does not have a 15 "pin" d-sub female port, or if it does but you want to connect two VGA monitors, a standard DVI-I to VGA gender adapter plugged into the DVI port outputs VGA video. The digital output is not compatible with the MDA, HGA, CGA, or EGA monitors.



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