Solved How to boost/extend wi-fi signal strength?

Dell - inspiron 17.3" laptop - 4gb memor...
August 4, 2014 at 14:17:45
Specs: Windows 8.1, AMD A8/4.0Gb
Frequently, I can not access Netflix on my smart HDTV. At those times, the signal strength, as measured by the TV, is below the the Netflix requirement. In a previous posting, I asked what was the best solution; a wifi range extender was suggested.

I went to my local electronic store and described the situation. One sales person said I needed a wifi range extender while another said I needed a wifi booster. As I was confused, I left the store without a purchase.

Which of these would be best for my situation?

Thank you.
Brian W


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✔ Best Answer
August 5, 2014 at 22:40:48
I use a Netgear WN2000RPT Universal WiFi Range Extender and it works great. Got it on ebay for US $26.99 and free shipping. A great unit for what you are looking for....

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#1
August 4, 2014 at 14:46:24
It's the same device only different terminology. They both do the same thing. Is it possible to move your router closer to the tv? I would try that first.

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#2
August 4, 2014 at 15:00:43
Does your wireless router have an external antenna?

If it does maybe you can try a home made solution?

I was recently talking to a workmate about how he extends his wireless signal. Although I'm sceptical he swears by it.

The closest thing I could see on YouTube that he was describing is linked below:

http://youtu.be/aUYGb2JtQYA

One thing I don't think the fella mentions is that the inside curve needs to be directed towards the target device.


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#3
August 4, 2014 at 15:12:19
You might also consider using the homeplug system.

The modules plug into mains sockets. One connects to the router by a standard cat-5/ethernet cable. Then plug another module into an outlet that is conveniently close to your Netflix box/tv. Connect that module to your Netflix box/tv with another cat-5 cable.

The house mains wiring is the wired network system - and current modules are anything from 200-500Mbps transmission rate. 85Mbps works fine for me and occasional "on demand" programmes I may watch that way. So 200Mbps will be fine.

If in the UK or Europe the brand I would suggest is Devolo; they were the first as I recall and have an excellent range and product record. There are other brands too; tp-link (we seem to get a few CFH here about those on occasion); Netgear seem ok; I think D-link have some too.

They also have modules that plug into the mains socket and radiate wifi connection; the module being connecting to the main router via the mains wiring, and then acting as the remote wifi access point ( much as a wifi extender will do). This approach would replicate your current wifi connection but with an increased signal strength and stability.

The beauty of this approach is the immediacy of the connection; the flexibility of it - simply plug an appropriate module where you need a wired or wifi connection and it's there.


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Related Solutions

#4
August 4, 2014 at 15:17:50
Grasshopper,

Thank you for your response. Unfortunately, I can not move the router closer to the tv.

Brian W


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#5
August 4, 2014 at 15:20:06
Btk1w1,

Thank you for your response. The router that I am using, Belkin N750 DB, does not have an antenna so the method you suggested would not work.

Brian W


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#6
August 4, 2014 at 15:24:32
trvlr,

Thank you for your response. I have two routers; the one I am currently using is a Belkin N750 DB Wireless Dual-Band N+ Router (Model :F9K1103) which I use for its wireless capability and a Linksys Etherfast Cable/DSL Router (Model BEFSR41).

Is there a way that I could use both of these routers at the same time to increase/extend the wifi signal strength?

Thank you.
Brian W


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#7
August 4, 2014 at 16:13:15
I'm not sure if we discussed this in your previous post Brian, but have you considered lengthening the Ethernet cable that runs from your ISP supplied modem to your wireless router (I'm assuming that this is the setup you have)?

You can run an Ethernet cable between the two up to 100 metres (?) in length before you start getting signal degradation.

If you aren't opposed to running a cable for example, from the modems location to a more central (or closer to the tv) location in the house, to the wireless router, you will achieve signal strength where you need it most without suffering loss of speed or reliability. If you are able you can even run the cabling under the floor of your house and bring it close to where you need the wireless router.

There won't be any need to reconfigure any of your hardware. You will of course have to terminate the wireless router close to a power point wherever you decide to place it.

message edited by btk1w1


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#8
August 5, 2014 at 08:10:04
btk1w1,

Thank you for your response. Due to the layout of my house, it is not practical to run cable so that the modem is closer to the TV.

Would cabling two routers together increase the signal strength or is the signal strength a function of the modem?

Thank you.
Brian W


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#9
August 5, 2014 at 12:42:26
Wifi signal degrades over distance; and also is affected by whatever is in the path between the "transmitter and the "receiver".

While accepting that mobile (cell) phones and internet wifi are on higher frequencies than radio/tv... That "degradation" is what actually allows for the multitude of local radio and tv stations in most western countries (combined with suitable polarity of the transmitted signal in the case of fm/tv). Although if one pushes out a very powerful signal one may extend the range quite a bit...; but it will in the end degrade, and also fall foul of the fact that the earth is (allegedly) round... If the radiated signal simply went on for ever with no loss... (and if the earth isn't as alleged "round") then it wouldn't be possible to have stations in adjacent towns/cities/countries on the same frequencies... It would be a complete jumbled up mess...

Without getting into it all too deeply, it also depends on the frequencies being transmitted; "Long Wave" (as was called) - 300-3000kHz travels further than Medium Wave (as was called) aka am band in America - 526.50-1606.5kHz; and Short Wave travels much less well; but will bounce well off the upper atmosphere and thus 'skip" around the globe to be picked up variously - and at specific times in specific locations... VLF (Very Low Frequency travels very well under water...); and you can likely deduce where that can be and is used...; and by whom. And in N. America there is an extended am band too...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longwave

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medium...

Possibly some wifi modems/routers are better than others in terms of signal strength; although there are accepted minimum standards nowadays for the kit...

A cable (cat-5) connection between the router and "receiver (network card etc.) is pretty solid up to 100 metres. However as you approach the 100 metre end it will likely degrade a little. The maximum you can run with cat-5/5E (and even cat-6 if you really want to be safe) is 100 metres; then you have to include a hub/switch or (or a repeater/amp) to boost it again for another 100 metres; and that can only be done 3 times if my memory serves correctly.

To connect two routers wirelessly means they must be both be able to use that method. And I seem to recall that CurtR went through that routine recently? For it to work you will need a stable signal incoming from the source/main router to the repeater router. It doesn't have to be 100% signal strength incoming but certainly a decent level (and stable)...


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#10
August 5, 2014 at 22:40:48
✔ Best Answer
I use a Netgear WN2000RPT Universal WiFi Range Extender and it works great. Got it on ebay for US $26.99 and free shipping. A great unit for what you are looking for....

HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions


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