How do I select memory?

December 28, 2008 at 18:46:06
Specs: Windows Vista, Intel i7, 3GB DDR3

There seem to be many different types,speeds and voltages of memory---and I don't know how to select it properly.
This is for a gaming computer and I'd like to add more memory. It came with 3GB of DDR3 (1066Mhz). How do I choose the right brand and type of memory? I have read that some brands are more reliable than others. I believe that this system requires the use of 3 ,or multiples of 3, memory sticks for optimal performance. Is it better to add 3 additional single memory sticks, or to substitute 3, 2GB memory sticks, or do both configurations give exactly the same results? Thanks, in advance.

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#1
December 28, 2008 at 19:03:10

Unless you're running a 64-bit operating system, it's pointless to add any more memory.

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#2
December 28, 2008 at 19:24:54

Yes, it is Vista 64-bit. Sorry I didn't post that earlier.

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#3
December 29, 2008 at 06:14:27

I not really up on the i7, X58 boards & triple channel RAM but the 1st thing you'd need to know is how many RAM slots you have...3 or 6? If it's 3, you'd obviously have to replace what you have. If it's 6, you could just add 3 more sticks. Just make sure to match the specs of the RAM you already have.

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Related Solutions

#4
December 29, 2008 at 08:37:44

Thanks for being helpful.
There are 6 RAM slots.
What I don't know, is how to determine what the "specs" are for my current RAM and which of those parameters must be precisely matched.
I know that I need DDR3 RAM, but there are apparently different types of DDR3 RAM .
As I stated earlier, I don't understand the significance of the various memory specs.
Comparing these examples, which are all 240 pin SDRAM DDR3, what are the differences between them and which differences are significant?
OCZ Reaper HPC 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866 (PC3 15000) Cas Latency: 9
Timing: 9-9-9-28
TO
CORSAIR XMS3 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Cas Latency: 9
Timing: 9-9-9-24
TO
CORSAIR XMS3 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Cas Latency: 9
Timing: 9-9-9-24

I am guessing that the numbers immediating following DDR3 (1333,1600,1866) are the Mhz, but should they be the same as what the computer already has?
Thanks.


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#5
December 29, 2008 at 11:12:27

Hi there, have you checked any that is already installed in your PC, I took mine out and it had a sticker on saying what it was, you need to match up the PC**** (whatever yours is) up with the ones you are buying and ensure the MHz ratings also match.

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#6
December 29, 2008 at 14:59:50

Thanks for being helpful.
There are 6 RAM slots.
What I don't know, is how to determine what the "specs" are for my current RAM and which of those parameters must be precisely matched.
I know that I need DDR3 RAM, but there are apparently different types of DDR3 RAM .
As I stated earlier, I don't understand the significance of the various memory specs.
Comparing these examples, which are all 240 pin SDRAM DDR3, what are the differences between them and which differences are significant?
OCZ Reaper HPC 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866 (PC3 15000) Cas Latency: 9
Timing: 9-9-9-28
TO
CORSAIR XMS3 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Cas Latency: 9
Timing: 9-9-9-24
TO
CORSAIR XMS3 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1333 (PC3 10666) Cas Latency: 9
Timing: 9-9-9-24

I am guessing that the numbers immediating following DDR3 (1333,1600,1866) are the Mhz, but should they be the same as what the computer already has?
Thanks.


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#7
March 15, 2009 at 20:40:50

SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Cas Latency: 9
SDRAM = Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory
DDR3 = Double Data Rate, 3rd generation
1600 = data rate of each signal on the memory bus, 1600 Megabits per sec (Mbps). The clock rate is 800 MHz. The data rate is double the clock rate.
PC3 = Printed Circuit generation 3. i.e. the entire memory stick.
12800 = Data Rate of the entire memory stick. 12.8 GigaBytes per sec (GB/s)
Cas Latency 9 = number of memory bus clocks it takes for the memory stick to respond to a read request. Each clock of an 800 MHz clock is 1.25 ns. 9 clocks = 11.25 ns.
Regards

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