Solved Help with upgrading fried CPU/motherboard

July 14, 2013 at 05:26:52
Specs: Windows Vista
Home built desktop 2008, CPU fan packed in last week.Replaced fan everything else works but motherboard/cpu.. I now wish to upgrade my motherboard/cpu. The remaining hardware is in good working order so have more to spend on motherboard/cpu (maybe new graphics card also.. Power unit Antec 500w, Hard drive WD caviar blue 500GB sata/16mb cache (+ 1TB usb external hd).. Patriot DDR2 800mhz- four x 2ghz.. Graphics card, PNY Ge-Force GT220 DDR2 .. My pc is used mainly for home entertainment also for my work with 3d engineering design softwares..I can install the parts myself (having an engineering background).. My issue is choosing compatible components..Any help would be wonderful..Many thanks Dominic.. ps: Old motherboard/cpu was Gigabyte GA-M56S-SE Sata2 Dual channel DDR2.. Amd Am2 64 4850e Dual core 2500ghz

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✔ Best Answer
July 14, 2013 at 13:05:20
"In doing so i saw the layer on top of the processor was melted"

Exactly, that was the old thermal material. It is supposed to be "melted" like that (probably a wax based pad). The old stuff should have been completely removed & then replaced with a small dab of paste as show in my other response. See the following explanation:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therma...

My guess is nothing is fried - you simply didn't reapply thermal material. It may seem odd that it will prevent a system from booting, but it will. It is absolutely necessary & MUST be applied properly. Radio Shack sells "heat sink grease" for about $4.

http://www.radioshack.com/product/i...

Apply as per these instructions: http://www.arcticsilver.com/PDF/app...



#1
July 14, 2013 at 06:59:54
Can you tell us how you determined the CPU & board have failed? All modern CPUs have built-in thermal protection so it's almost impossible to overheat one to death. Did you replace just the CPU cooling fan or did you replace the entire heatsink/fan unit? If you simply replaced the fan, did you remove the heatsink to do it? Properly applying thermal paste between the CPU & heatsink is critical, if you did it incorrectly (too much, none at all, or re-used old paste), it could prevent the system from booting & make it appear to be dead. The center dot method should be used on all AMD CPUs:

http://www.techpowerup.com/articles...


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#2
July 14, 2013 at 07:29:39
And if the system won't start up, how do you know the other hardware is OK?


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#3
July 14, 2013 at 12:26:33
Hi thanks for reply.. I replaced the fan and heatsink.. In doing so i saw the layer on top of the processor was melted.. No sign of identification, serial number or anything visable.. Turned it on and everything lit up/started spinning(fans,hard drive, dvdrw opened-closed and spun disc) but nothing else.. No boot.. Was planning new pc or upgrade later in year but this has forced my hand.. Have approx £300($450) for cpu/motherboard plus more if graphics card needs upgrade.. Planned to move to windows7 or 8 too..

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Related Solutions

#4
July 14, 2013 at 13:05:20
✔ Best Answer
"In doing so i saw the layer on top of the processor was melted"

Exactly, that was the old thermal material. It is supposed to be "melted" like that (probably a wax based pad). The old stuff should have been completely removed & then replaced with a small dab of paste as show in my other response. See the following explanation:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therma...

My guess is nothing is fried - you simply didn't reapply thermal material. It may seem odd that it will prevent a system from booting, but it will. It is absolutely necessary & MUST be applied properly. Radio Shack sells "heat sink grease" for about $4.

http://www.radioshack.com/product/i...

Apply as per these instructions: http://www.arcticsilver.com/PDF/app...


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#5
July 14, 2013 at 13:43:33
I will try this and see what happens.. Many thanks

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#6
July 16, 2013 at 12:30:46
Silicon can't melt at the temperatures present in the computer. As riider has stated, most likely a thermal pad, which you must completely remove.

Stick with this thread. You have already asked about newer hardware here.


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