help! strange screen while installing Vista

Microsoft Windows vista ultimate w/ sp1...
October 7, 2009 at 17:08:41
Specs: Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium, 2.5 GHz / 3964 MB
I'm trying to install Vista from DVD. It loads
files and when it's supposed to show me
installation menu - I get this: http://www.2shared.com/file/8289211...
/photo.html
and it doesn't go anywhere. Any idea what it
can be? I am absolutely positive that the disk
is a working installation disk. Please help!

i have asus p5w dh deluxe with intel core2 duo w/ 4g ram and evga 8800 graphic card


See More: help! strange screen while installing Vista

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#1
October 7, 2009 at 17:35:06
"I am absolutely positive that the disk
is a working installation disk".

What exact type of install DVD are you using?


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#2
October 7, 2009 at 20:43:15
this is vista ultimate edition and I've personally seen it installed
from that disk 2 times. I had one more disk with Vista that I
borrowed from a friend of mine - I get same screen. So the disk
should not be the issue.

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#3
October 8, 2009 at 05:40:44
It looks like a memory issue:

"CPU/Ram: 2.5 GHz / 3964 MB"

just put one stick of memory in and try again!


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Related Solutions

#4
October 8, 2009 at 06:30:53
can that be processor overheat?

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#5
October 8, 2009 at 09:14:57
"It looks like a screen resolution issue, would suspect graphics card conflict/faulty.."

When you boot from the DVD, the display should be fine. I suspect you have a hardware problem.

You could try a different monitor, but usually that isn't the problem.

If that doesn't help, your evga 8800 graphic card may have a poor connection, or it may be damaged.

Remove or switch off the power to the computer case.
Open up the case by removing the left side panel as seen from the front of the case.
Remove the evga 8800 graphics card.
Wipe off the contacts on the bottom of the card with a paper towel or a soft cloth - don't touch the contacts with your bare fingers after that.
Check the fan and the heatsink that cools the video chipset for "mung" - a buildup of dust and lint. If you see that, remove it, but DO NOT use a vaccuum cleaner to remove that - they produce a remendous ampunt of static electricity while running.
Try moving the fan on the card. If there is nothing wrong with it, it should move in jumps, and it should move easily. If it's difficult to move, the fan is failing, and the fan should be replaced. However, in that case, the video chipset the fan cools may already be damaged. If the graphics are distorted when you boot the computer after it has had a chance to cool to room temp, the card's video chipset is damaged and the card is not fixable. If the graphics are okay when you boot the computer after it has had a chance to cool to room temp, the card's video chipset is probably okay, and replacing the fan should cure your problem.
Install the evga 8800 card.
Make sure it's all the way down in it's slot.
Fasten it down with it's screw.
Some AGP or PCI-E X16 slots also have a clip that can be moved to hold down the inner end of the card.
.....

While you're in there, if the cpu fan/heatsink has mung (dust, lint, etc.) on it, clean it off, but DO NOT use a vaccuum cleaner to do that (they produce a tremendous amount of static electricity when running, and anything connected to them can discharge that to your components) - use canned air, or an air nozzle if you have access to an air compressor, or an artist's brush that can be used in small spaces, etc. It may be difficult to clean the top of the heatsink under the cpu fan - the most likely place to have mung on it - and the bottom side of the cpu fan blades unless you remove the fan. If you have a case fan, clean that too if it needs it.

With the cover still off, restore the AC power, start the computer and make sure the cpu fan spins - if it doesn't spin, if you're sure the power supply is working okay, don't use the computer until you have replaced it.
If it spins too slowly, and/or if it makes rattling or screeching noises, most likely to be noticed when the computer has cooled to room temp, has not been used for a while, and then is started up, the cpu fan's bearings are failing - replace it as soon as you can.

Try the computer.
........

"can that be processor overheat?"

It's extremely unlikely an overheated processor would cause your video symptoms.
If the graphics are okay when you boot the computer after it has had a chance to cool to room temp, the processor would not be too hot at that time in any case, unless it's fan were not spinning properly.
.....

A frequent mistake people are making these days is they have installed a video card their power supply hasn't got enough capacity to support.

Your power supply must have at least the minumum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD!)
You can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements.


If the power supply does not have enough capacity, the video card often works fine at first anyway, but the PS is overloaded 100% of the time the computer is running and the PS is damaged and will eventually fail completely.

E.g.
The 8800GS, GT, and GTS video chipset requires a minimum 400 watt PS - 500 watt or more recommended to limit the continuous load on the PS to about 80% or less.

The 8800GTX video chipset requires a minimum 450 watt PS - 562.5 watts or more recommended to limit the continuous load on the PS to about 80% or less.
(550 watts - 81.9%)

Failing power supplies are common and can cause your symptoms.
Check your PS.
Check the current voltage readings in the mboard's bios Setup.
See response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...


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#6
October 8, 2009 at 11:07:13
Ok. I've built this comp From scratch myself about a year ago.
It worked peefectly all this time. I recently bought another pc
for my office with quad core and 4 gigs of ram. but I closed
down my office and decided to take CPU and ram from office
comp. But my mb wouldn't take quad core without bios update
and when I ran flash utility it would freeze on me all the time.
So I decided just to put new ram. but at the point When I took
out CPU hoping to replace it I occasionaly wiped off thermal
compound with my finger , and I only had like 1 drop left in
stack. So I put all I had but that probably wasn't enough.That's
the reason I asked about CPU. I've cleaned all the conections
so this is not th issue. I'll try to replace ram back and will reply
later. Thanks for everybodys input.

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#7
October 9, 2009 at 19:36:57
crap... I replaced RAM and have same issue. have no idea what
to do now... even before I replaced it XP that runs on that pc
started to freeze like 1 out 5 times. it freezes the screen - mouse
still moves and keyboard responds to numlock, but you can't
click anything and have to reboot. 4 out of 5 times it works
perfect - runs all programs, games, video etc. HELP!!!

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#8
October 9, 2009 at 20:48:13
What is the power supply max output capacity?

See the latter part of response 5.

The power supply must be at least a minimum 400 or 450 watts.

If you're frequently playing recent games, it's recommended you don't load the PS constantly to more that 80% of it's capacity, so the minimum PS capacity should be the minumum required for the graphics chipset X 1.25 = 500, or 562.5 watts

If the power supply does not have enough capacity, the video card often works fine at first anyway, but the PS is overloaded 100% of the time the computer is running and the PS is damaged and will eventually fail completely.

Have you checked the video card fan and whether you have "mung" on that fan or the cpu fan?
See response 5.

"When I took out CPU hoping to replace it I occasionaly wiped off thermal compound with my finger , and I only had like 1 drop left in stack."

It doesn't take much thermal compound, but if there isn't enough your cpu will run too hot !
If you thought it might not have been enough, why didn't you get more the first chance you got, remove the cpu heatsink, and apply more ?

It's easy to check the current temp of the CPU in the mboard's bios Setup. You can easily find out the usual average idle temp the cpu is supposed to run at on the web, and you can certainly find out what the max safe temp is for your cpu on the Intel web site.

If your cpu has been damaged from it getting too hot too often, yes, that would cause problems, but it's NOT likely to cause the video problems you see when you boot from the DVD!
.....

There's probably nothing wrong with the original ram ram if it was working fine previously. Problems with ram are extremely unlikely to cause what you're seeing when you boot from the DVD!

Ram that works in another mboard , or any ram you buy or have lying around, may not work properly, or sometimes, not at all - even if it physically fits and is the right overall type (e.g. SDram, DDR, DDR2, etc.; PCxxxx, xxx mhz) for your mboard. In the worst cases of incompatibilty your mboard WILL NOT BOOT all the way with it installed, and the mboard may not even beep - the ram has to be compatible with the mboard's main chipset, or in the case of recent mboards, compatible with the memory controller built into the cpu.

If you still have the ram that was installed when the system worked fine, try installing just that ram.

See response 5 in this for some info about ram compatibilty, and some places where you can find out what will work in your mboard for sure:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...
Correction to that:
Mushkin www.mushkin.com

Once you know which module ID strings work in your mboard, you can get them from anywhere you like that has ram with those ID strings.

If you have brand name ram, it is usually easy to look up whether it's ID string is in a list of compatible modules found by using your mboard or brand name system model number.
If the ram is generic, that may be difficult or impossible.


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#9
October 9, 2009 at 21:57:21
i specifically made sure power supply can handle video card,
but below is a copy of the full order from a year ago for
details. regarding CPU - i actually went to a store the same
day I posted this thread, got and applied more compound so
my CPU temp is now 40-45 at max (using program called
speedfan). I did check video card - both connection and fans -
they are fine. But do you think this window at start up and
freezes are connected anyhow?
just ran memtest - nothing found. tried with another monitor - same thing.

also here is snapshot of my speedfan temperatures http://www.2shared.com/file/8334269...

x Antec Performance One P180B Black 0.8mm cold rolled
steel for durability through the majority of chassis 1.0mm cold
rolled steel around the 4 x HDD area ATX Mid Tower
Computer Case - Retail
1 x ASUS P5W DH DELUXE/WIFI-AP LGA 775 Intel 975X
ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail
1 x EVGA 768-P2-N831-AR GeForce 8800 GTX 768MB 384-
bit GDDR3 PCI Express x16 HDCP Ready SLI Supported
Video Card - Retail
1 x Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 Conroe 2.4GHz LGA 775 65W
Dual-Core Processor Model BX80557E6600 - Retail
1 x Western Digital Raptor X WD1500AHFD 150GB 10000
RPM SATA 1.5Gb/s 3.5" Hard Drive - OEM
1 x SeaSonic S12-600 600W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Certified
CrossFire Ready Active PFC Power Supply - Retail
1 x G.SKILL 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2
800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model F2-
6400PHU2-2GBHZ - Retail


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#10
October 10, 2009 at 09:21:49
"i actually went to a store the same
day I posted this thread, got and applied more compound so
my CPU temp is now 40-45 at max (using program called
speedfan)"

That temp range is fine. Did you check it before you got the additional thermal compound? The cpu could certainly have been damaged if it got too hot too often, BUT, as I've already said, it's extremely unlikely that would cause your video problem when you boot the Windows DVD.

You don't need to use SpeedFan. There is an Asus supplied program on the CD that came with the mboard - Probe - that you can install in Windows - it's more likely to be more accurate than SpeedFan is.
If you don't have the CD, it's probably available on the Asus web site in the software downloads for your model.

"I did check video card - both connection and fans -
they are fine."

OK, good to know.

"But do you think this window at start up and
freezes are connected anyhow? "

Software problems can cause freezes that have nothing to do with whether you have hardware problems.
Your video problem when you boot from the Windows DVD cannot have anything to do with what data is on the hard drive.
If you get freezes when you have booted from the Windows DVD, that can't be caused by anything except a hardware problem.

Regarding the freezes, you should test the hard drive to rule out the possibility of the hard drive is starting to fault.

Check your hard drive with the manufacturer's diagnostics.
See the latter part of response 1 in this:
http://www.computing.net/windows95/...

(thanks to Dan Penny for this link:)
Hard Drive Diagnostics Tools and Utilities
http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm...

If you don't have a floppy drive, you can get a CD image diagnostic utility from most hard drive manufacturer's web sites, but obviously you would need to make a burned CD, preferably a CD-R for best compatibilty, on another computer if you need to.

If the hard drive itself tests okay, any data problems found can be fixed, one way or another.
.......

"just ran memtest - nothing found."

OK, good to know.

" tried with another monitor - same thing."

It's rare for the monitor to be the problem.


" EVGA 768-P2-N831-AR GeForce 8800 GTX "

The 8800GTX video chipset requires a minimum 450 watt PS - 562.5 watts or more recommended to limit the continuous load on the PS to about 80% or less.

"SeaSonic S12-600 600W"

That 600w capacity exceeds both minimums.

It has a 3 year warranty - that's good.
However, a relatively higher number of faulty units than average noted in Customer reviews:
http://www.newegg.com/product/produ...

Check your PS by checking the current voltages in the bios Setup.
See response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

If they're within 10% of the nominal amount, the chances are very good there's nothing wrong with the PS, but you can never tell for sure until you try another known good PS.
......

Regarding the video problem when you boot the Windows DVD...
Going by the info you have supplied so far, if there's nothing wrong with the PS, I suspect your EVGA 768-P2-N831-AR GeForce 8800 GTX is damaged.
.....

Regarding the Regarding the video problem when you boot the Windows DVD, AND the freezes....

One unlikely but possible thing...

Examine the mboard to see if you have bad capacitors, and/or other findable signs of mboard damage .

This was the original bad capacitor problem - has some example pictures.
History of why the exploding capacitors and which mboard makers were affected:
http://members.datafast.net.au/~dft...

What to look for, mboard symptoms, example pictures:
http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Home page that site
- what the problem is caused by
- he says there are STILL bad capacitors on more recent mboards.
http://www.badcaps.net/

Pictures of blown capacitors, other components, power supplies, Athlon cpu's, etc.:
http://www.halfdone.com/Personal/Jo...
......

Regarding the freezes....

Is /are your optical (CD or DVD) drive(s) working fine? They can cause strange problem while they're failing.

If the mouse is USB, I have one Logitech "combo" USB/PS/2 mouse that conflicts with some other USB devices when connected via USB, and that can cause freezes while booting.
Try a different mouse.


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#11
October 10, 2009 at 22:22:52
checked hard drive - passed all tests. checked voltage - ok.
i tried to boot vista from external hard drive to check on DVD. same issue.

on graphic card - don't you think that if there was an issue I'd have it on more constant bases? I mean it runs direct x diagnostics just fine, any game runs flawlessly, movies etc. and the only time it fails - is to display user menu for vista at start up?


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#12
October 10, 2009 at 23:33:15
I'll also try to examine MB as you mentioned, but i doubt i'll find anything. I'll also try to physically disconnect DVD and try to remove one stick of RAM or smth.. that's probaly not going anywhere and i'm out of any ideas...

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#13
October 11, 2009 at 07:10:39
"checked hard drive - passed all tests. checked voltage - ok. "

Good, and good.

"on graphic card ...any game runs flawlessly, movies etc. and the only time it fails - is to display user menu for vista at start up?"

So the display is only weird when you boot using the DVD ?

OR - are you trying to run Vista Setup from the DVD from Vista?

"I'll also try to physically disconnect DVD..."

That doesn't make any sense if the display is only weird when you boot using the DVD.

"...try to remove one stick of RAM or smth..."

That makes no sense at all since your have tested the ram and it tests fine.
......

The only other thing I can think of, if the display is only weird when you boot using the DVD, is you have a problem with the DVD drive.

Try using a laser lens cleaning CD in the drive. If you don't have one, you can get one at most places that sell CDs or DVDs, or even some "dollar" stores have them for a buck or two.

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittant, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.


Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.
.........

If that doesn't help, you probably need to replace the DVD drive.


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#14
October 11, 2009 at 07:21:54
one more thing i just remember that i want to mention. I had a
problem with DVD at the very beginning. I couldn't make it
work for couple hours. There are couple data ports on the MB
and it appears that DVD would only work from the furthest one
with a longer spare data cable. I later read forums and at least
couple more people had same issue indicating that it was
some P5W defect. But at that time I had everything working
so I didn't bother returning anything.
I don't know when it started but now it detects hard drives in a
strange way it actually detects primary drive as a third
primary drive and then detects DVD separately and you have
to "press any button to continue". I didn't move jumpers or
change anything. Bios setup for detection is "auto".


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#15
October 11, 2009 at 07:29:45
I read your post #13 after I wrote and posted 14. Yes I only have
that issue when i boot from DVD. If I run DVD in XP - no
problems, but I want to format the drive so I have to boot from it.
Just tried to change data cable - it doesn't detect - exactly like a
year ago. There is only one port it would work from.
But as I mentioned before - I got the same issue when I booted
from Seagate hard drive through USB.

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#16
October 12, 2009 at 13:32:03
"I had a
problem with DVD at the very beginning. I couldn't make it
work for couple hours. There are couple data ports on the MB
and it appears that DVD would only work from the furthest one
with a longer spare data cable. I later read forums and at least
couple more people had same issue indicating that it was
some P5W defect."

You haven't said whether your DVD drive is IDE or SATA.

If it's SATA it should work with any SATA header, but
- on some mboards you can only boot a bootable disk in the DVD drive when it's connected to a "Master" SATA header. In that case, the mboard manual tells you which SATA headers you can connect a DVD drive to if you want to be able to boot a CD from it (or if you want to boot an operating system from a SATA hard drive ), and the two types of SATA headers ("master" and "slave") are often two different colors.

Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.
.......

If it's IDE
- new drives are usually set to cable select or master by default.
- the jumper or no jumper setting on the back of the drive may need to be changed, if you connect the drive to a data cable that has another drive on the same data cable.
Both drives have to be set to cable select, or one drive has to be set to master, the other to slave.
You don't mix cable select and master/slave settings for two drives on the same data cable.
In some cases, you have to change the jumper settings for both drives - e.g. some hard drives have two ways they can be set to master - e.g. master, single, for when it's by itself on the datacable, or master, with slave, if another drive on the same data cable is set to slave. If you don't use the later setting when there are two drives on the data cable and the other drive is set to slave, the drive set to slave probably won't be detected by the mboard properly.

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittant, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.
.........

"....people had same issue indicating that it was
some P5W defect"

That's extremely unlikely. It's a lot more likely they had the setting on a drive wrong, or there was a problem with the data cable they were using.
........

"I don't know when it started but now it detects hard drives in a strange way it actually detects primary drive as a third
primary drive ....."

Vista sees itself, as in, the partition Vista's Windows is installed on and the partition Vista is booting from., as being installed on C:, no matter which hard drive partition you install it on, on a system. Therefore, Vista's C isn't necessarily the first partition on the first hard drive detected by the bios.

That doesn't always apply to XP and 2000.

The bios BOTH
- detects drives in the order in which they are connected to IDE or IDE data cables or SATA headers.
- determines which hard drive or optical drive it tries to boot from first
....

It detects drives in the order in which they are connected to IDE or SATA headers.

There is a Primary IDE and a Secondary IDE header on most mboards, although recent ones may have only the one Primary IDE header, and some older mboards have as many as 4 IDE headers, if they have a second separate IDE or SATA/IDE controller.
Normally your hard drive you boot your operating system from is connected to the Primary IDE header and set to or seen as master. If you get the Primary and Secondary IDE headers mixed up and connect your hard drive you boot your operating system from to the Secndary IDE header, if it's set to or seen as master, it will be master on the Secondary IDE in the bios.
If both drives on a data cable are set to cable select, the one on the end connector is seen as master, the one on the middle connector is slave.
If two drives on the same data cable are set to master and slave, it doesn't matter which of the two data cable connectors the drives are connected to - the one set to or seen as master is seen as master in the bios.

The SATA headers are numbered. The first one is the default location you would connect a SATA hard drive to, and the first SATA connection in the bios.
.....

It determines which hard drive or optical drive it tries to boot from first
- it boots the operating system from the first hard drive listed in the boot order list in the bios, or if you have more than one hard drive, from the first hard drive model in a list near the boot order list. If the firsrt hard drive listed is not bootable, it does not try other hard drives, if you have more than one, to see if it is / they are bootable.
- some bioses default to booting from the first IDE hard drive detected. Some bioses default to booting from the first SATA hard drive detected. Some bioses default to booting from the first IDE or SATA drive detected regardless of whether it's a hard drive or an optical drive. When you add or remove a drive, the default boot order may change automatically.
You may need to change settings in the bios in order for it to boot from the drive you want it to boot from.
- many bioses will only boot from a bootable disk when it's in one certain CD or DVD drive when you have more than one connected. In that case, if you want to be able to boot from a bootable disk in another drive, you have to go into the bios and find the list of CD or DVD drives, and make the drive model you want to boot from the first one in the list.
....

"Yes I only have that issue when i boot from DVD. If I run DVD in XP - no problems"

If you run the DVD in another DVD drive in XP on another computer, of course you're not going to have any problems.

Try connecting the subject DVD drive to the XP computer, and trying to boot from the DVD in that. If the video is still botched, then it's got to be the DVD drive that's defective, or that needs it's laser lens to be cleaned, or there's a problem with the data cable you're using.
.....

"Just tried to change data cable - it doesn't detect - exactly like a
year ago. There is only one port it would work from.

You probably did not have the jumper or no jumper setting right, or you had a problem with the data cable you were using, or a setting in the bios was incorrect.

and then detects DVD separately and you have
to "press any button to continue".


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#17
October 13, 2009 at 11:09:35
thanks for you input. Here is some update
went to a friend of mine. we replaced video card - got same
issue, replaced dvd drive (tried both sata and ide and new
cables for both) - same issue. Replaced hard drive - same
issue. All above equipment was taken from working PC.

After numerous attempts I finally was able to install new
windows after changing priority in BIOS to PCI/PCI express.
Have no idea why it worked. Still gave me that strange screen
but this time it also displayed installation menu. On the very
first boot up of newly installed windows it game me blue
screen indicating problem with nvidia driver. Booted ok after
restart. Every other time it still doesn't boot. Not even BIOS
boots up - just black screen with no action. After all these
tests it's gotta be either CPU (since we didn't test it) or bad
PCI express slot (I have 2 slots but the card is too big to fit
into the second due to wiring) or something with MB. My
friend took it to hs workplace to test MB, power supply, CPU,
may be try another slot etc. So issue partially resolved.


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