Solved fix slow file transfer to flash drive

February 15, 2012 at 05:22:06
Specs: Windows 7
I have a Sandisk cruzer 2GB flash drive and only recently have i noticed that the file transfer to/from the drive is really slow. usually it takes only a minute or so to copy a 1-2GB file, but as I am writing this in the background it is taking over 8 minutes to copy only a 126MB folder (the folder does contain over 1000 files, but that shouldn't matter right?). Deleting and/or copying files from the flash drive takes a long time also. It has only been like this for a week or so, and I didn't do any major updates to my computer that may have changed this. There may have been an auto update from Windows sometime between when it was OK and now, but not 100% sure. Any suggestions on how to get my transfer speed back to what it used to be?

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✔ Best Answer
April 28, 2012 at 05:06:23
You might need to set the write cache mode. Open Windows Explorer and find the flash drive in the left pane. Right-click on it, then choose "Properties". Then click the "Hardware" tab, and click the "Properties" button there.

At the bottom of this screen, click the "Change Settings" button. Click the "Policies" tab. Now click the "Better Performance" radio button and click "OK".

This enables write caching on the thumb drive, but you MUST use Windows "Safely Remove Hardware" option (click the icon on the taskbar) whenever you take the thumb drive out or else you might lose data.

Mark



#1
February 15, 2012 at 05:32:46
Are you connecting the flash drive to a USB hub? That can drop transfer speeds to USB 1.1.

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#2
February 15, 2012 at 07:04:00
No. I am using the same slot on the side of the laptop that I have always used. I would figure that if i was doing something different and then noticed the problem, obviously what ever I was doing different would be the problem, but nothing has changed in my setup (at least to my knowledge)

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#3
February 15, 2012 at 08:23:07
Verify in computer or disk management that the drive is still reading the full capacity which should be about 2GB x .931 = 1.86GB. Then look at the link below.

http://usbspeed.nirsoft.net/


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Related Solutions

#4
February 15, 2012 at 08:27:04
"the folder does contain over 1000 files, but that shouldn't matter right?"

It probably takes more time to copy more files than it does to copy fewer, but that alone doesn't account for the difference you're seeing, if it's the same flash drive.
....

USB 2.0 has a maximum theoretical bandwidth of 480 MBit/s = 60 MBytes/s (8 bits per byte), or 48 MBytes/s (10 bits per byte; 8 for data, 2 for "overhead" - all SATA hard drives use 10 bits per byte when transferring data) but you never get that in the real world.
You're fortunate if you get 3x MBytes/s.
.....

"The System always reserves some USB bandwidth for it's use. For Windows look here:

Device Manager (devmgmt.msc)
Universal Serial Bus Controllers, untree this (click the plus sign)
Select any of the "Blah blah blah USB Universal Host Controller / USB2 Enhanced Host Controller"
Right Click > Properties
Advanced Tab (at the top)

Most..." operating "...systems today reserve 10% of the bandwidth "
.....

NOTE - the "Enhanced" Host Controllers listed there are the USB 2.0 (or USB 3.0) host controllers. If you don't see any "Enhanced" Host Controllers there, the built in support Windows has for USB 2.0 (or USB 3.0 ?) has NOT been installed in Windows.

If you have installed Windows from scratch, after Setup has finished, it has only USB 1.1 support installed in Windows.
The USB 2.0 (or USB 3.0) support is NOT installed in Windows until AFTER you have loaded the main chipset drivers for your mboard.
.....

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...

Excerpt:

Though USB 2.0 supports data transfer rates of slightly better than 30 MB/sec, modern Flash memory chips can't yet match those speeds.
.....

The max data transfer rate of a flash drive varies greatly depending on which circuitry (chip or chips) it has. The faster the circuitry can run at, the better result you'll get.
Older flash drive models have lower data transfer rates.

E.g. A comparison of recent and fairly recent flash drive models
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...

.....

The data transfer rate you get also depends on what else the operating system is doing at the time. You can't compare data transfer rates unless that's the same.
.....

If the hard drive partition Windows itself was installed on is too full, that will slow down everything in Windows. That partition should have about 10% free space or more.

There are many other reasons for Windows running slower than it once did, and if it's runnig slower that will affect max data transfer speeds.


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#5
February 15, 2012 at 11:47:46
The number of files and the depth of the directory tree does make a difference.

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#6
April 28, 2012 at 05:06:23
✔ Best Answer
You might need to set the write cache mode. Open Windows Explorer and find the flash drive in the left pane. Right-click on it, then choose "Properties". Then click the "Hardware" tab, and click the "Properties" button there.

At the bottom of this screen, click the "Change Settings" button. Click the "Policies" tab. Now click the "Better Performance" radio button and click "OK".

This enables write caching on the thumb drive, but you MUST use Windows "Safely Remove Hardware" option (click the icon on the taskbar) whenever you take the thumb drive out or else you might lose data.

Mark


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