EPP mode in Bios

September 17, 2009 at 05:35:17
Specs: Windows XP
I have a question for all you laptop gurus.
I have a Sony Vaio model PCG-FR700. In the bios i only have the options of Normal, Bi-directional or Ecp. I need the option of Epp. The bios is Phoenix Bios R0105K6. Any help would be most appreciated.
Cheers and thanks.

See More: EPP mode in Bios

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#1
September 17, 2009 at 05:51:42
What happens when you change to Bi-directional? Do you get additional choices then? Have you tried any of the settings to see if they work correctly.


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#2
September 17, 2009 at 06:12:05
Select ECP. ECP includes the specification for EPP.

Read this:

http://whatis.techtarget.com/defini...

Whether it will work or not depends on what you are plugging into the other end. If it is a printer or scanner ECP should work fine.

Stuart


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#3
September 17, 2009 at 08:12:10
When the parallel port is built into the mboard...
Most parallel port connected devices made since about 1990, certainly nearly all printers, scanners, and printer/scanner/etc. all-in- one devices, will either not work correctly in your operating system or not be detected as being connected to a parallel port at all, unless you set the parallel port mode mode in the bios Setup to EPP, ECP, or EPP/ECP. They won't work properly or won't be detected at all if you set the mode to Normal a.k.a. SPP, or Bi-directional, which are legacy SLOW data rate standards.
If you see EPP, that usually works fine. If you don't see EPP but you see ECP that should work as well. ECP mode requires that there be a DMA (Direct Memory Access) channel available - sometimes it isn't available. Sometimes when you select ECP mode you can choose from more than one DMA channel - if the default DMA channel results in adevice not being detected, try the other one(s).
EPP mode doesn't require anything special to be done in your operating system - the labelling for the port is the same in Device Manager as it is when the mode is set to Normal a.k.a. SPP, or Bi-directional.
2000 and above auto detect when a parallel port is set to ECP mode. In ME and below back to Win 95 you have to use Add Hardware to have the operating system install the ECP parallel port support.

Similar applies when you use a parallel port card in a slot, although you usually don't need to set the mode yourself. The card's chipset must support EPP, ECP, or EPP/ECP mode. You can often change the settings for the card in the Properties for the card in Device Manager if default settings aren't suitable.

USB to parallel port adapter cables or other USB to parallel adapters that have the circuits built in to convert from the USB to parallel port interface often do NOT work with anything other than a printer or the printer component in a all-in-one, unless the device's description tells you otherwise.


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Related Solutions

#4
September 17, 2009 at 12:07:17
Thanks for the reply's. In Bi-directional i have no other choices.
I have tried the other settings to see if they work correctly. I have tried the device on a desk top with EPP and it works fine. I am trying to use a motion controller that must use EPP
http://www.geckodrive.com/upload/G540InitialSetup.pdf
as shown in step two of the setup guide. Do some BIOS suppliers leave out EPP or is it just for power saving on a laptop?
Cheers


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#5
September 17, 2009 at 13:39:42
Make sure the parallel port is enabled in the bios Setup.

If it already is, or if it wasn't and that doesn't help...

Make sure it isn't disabled in Device Manager.

Are you sure it's working? Have you tried the motion controller swith another computer since trying it with this laptop?

Usually a device that works in EPP mode also works in ECP mode, but there are exceptions.

Laptop bioses are notorious regarding the brand name's bios version leaving out settings that the mboard's bios is otherwise capable of.

Sometimes you can buy a bios UPGRADE online for your particular model that you can flash the bios with so it supports all the features the bios and the mboard main chipset is capable of supporting, including all possible cpu types, but the disadvantage of that is you probably would not then have the option of using the Recovery disks for your model, because it's likely the program will quit when it detects the bios version is no longer the brand name's bios version - in your case Sony.

You could buy
- a PCMCIA (PC Card) to enhanced parallel port adapter,
- or an ExpressCard enhanced parallel port adapter, whichever type of slot you have,
- or a motion controller than can use ECP mode or EPP/ECP mode,
but as I said above:
" USB to parallel port adapter cables or other USB to parallel adapters that have the circuits built in to convert from the USB to parallel port interface often do NOT work with anything other than a printer or the printer component in a all-in-one, unless the device's description tells you otherwise."


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