eMachine PSU took out mobo

Emachine / W2646
February 25, 2010 at 09:39:01
Specs: Windows XP Home
I have an EMachine W2646, about 4 years old. I turned on computer one morning and power supply blew taking out motherboard. I took it to a computer repair shop to make sure that was all it was. They ordered a new power supply and an Intel Desktop D865GVHZ. I installed them. I'm pretty sure I hooked it up right except for maybe the front panel LEDs/connectors. The first time I booted up, the fans were running but I was getting beeps. Every time I boot up after this, the PS fan and heatsink fans run for about 2 seconds then shut off, it doesn't boot. I cannot figure out what is wrong. I called EMachines to see if the motherboard was a compatible one with the EMachine and the dummies told me to call the computer repair shop who ordered the board for me to make sure it was compatible. LOL I have searched and searched the internet to find out maybe the front panel connectors/LEDs are proprietary and also the Power Supply might have been proprietary. Does anyone have any suggestions? And thank you in advance for your help.

See More: eMachine PSU took out mobo

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#1
February 25, 2010 at 10:12:54
You have to pay attention to the beeps. How many beeps and in what order. 3 short / 1 long etc. Disconnect everything except 1 stick of ram, the keyboard and the monitor. and of course the cpu. Connect the 20 or 24 pin mobo connector and the 4 pin plug to the mobo. See if it will post.Hook the monitor to the onboard video out.

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#2
February 25, 2010 at 11:27:02
Your probem is very common with emachines desktop computers.

If you connected BOTH the main 20 or 24 "pin" power connector, and the smaller one to a socket elsewhere on the mboard, from the power supply to the mboard, then you have connected the mboard correctly, and your problem probably is the mboard has been damaged while the original power supply was failing.

"I have searched and searched the internet to find out maybe the front panel connectors/LEDs are proprietary and also the Power Supply might have been proprietary"

Proprietary wired power supplies have NOT been used in desktop computers, except for systems with some oddball server mboards, for at least ten years, if not longer than that. They were a pain the the ass for both the brand name system builders and the users of the computer users who needed to replace a power supply. If a power supply newer than that is properitary at all, it's only the physical size of it that's oddball - e.g. some mini sized desktop computers have a smaller physical enclosure size PS, or, some power supplies for some some brand name system models (e.g. Dell ) are standard sized and standard wired, but they have diagnostic leds built into them, which are not required when you replace the power supply.

emachines desktop computers almost always use standard sized standard wired ATX power supplies. A few have standard wired but smaller physically sized power supplies.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

emachines desktop computers are well known to have el-cheapo power supplies that tend to fail more often than average, and when the power supply fails completely, they are a lot more likely than average to damage something else, often the mboard.

E.g. If the brand of the original PS is BESTEC, it's very likely that it damaged the mboard while failing in your situation.

If you're interested in trying it, if you replace the mboard, the odds are very good your system will work fine because there usually isn't anything wrong with anything else connected to the mboard.

Go here, and look up which mboard is in your W2646 model:

Update - correction to link:
http://www.e4allupgraders.info

Then click on the highlighted mboard model link to see the unofficial info about the mboard there, and who actually made the mboard. Sometimes there's a mboard manual in the Downloads on the left side of the screen. If that's there you can check your wiring connections to the mboard in that.
NOTE that that web site may have suspended allowing downloads - donate to it if you can afford to.

In most cases, the company that actually made the emachines system - Trigem in Korea - did not make the mboard - it was supplied to Trigem by a major mboard manufacturer, and merely has an emachines bios version on it.

Use the actual mboard model to search with, along with emachines, on the web, and you'll probably find a used mboard that was in an emachines system.
E.g. Intel Dxxxx Sea Breeze emachines

Make sure the ad says that the mboard has been TESTED and been found to work. It should say it has an emachines bios version.

You can use any mboard that is compatible with your cpu and ram that does not have an emachines bios version on it, as well, BUT in that case, you may NOT be able to restore the original emachines software contents of the hard drive when you use a Recovery disk or disk set for your model, because Recovery programs often check to see if the mboard has the brand name's bios version on it, and if doesn't, the Recovery program will often refuse to install the original brand name supplied software.
..........

If you have added, or have upgraded, a video card in a mboard slot....

Your power supply must have at least the minumum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD ! )
If that info is not in the ad for the video card, you can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. Some power supplies have two or more +12v ratings - in that case, add those ratings to determine the total +12v current capacity.

If you're a gamer....
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittant rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.



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#3
February 25, 2010 at 11:39:17
Ya emachines use cheap components to build their system but your lucky it lasted 4 yrs.
U should do as grasshopper said and post back the result.

Edit.. I just read tubes advice, yeah it's good advice.


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Related Solutions

#4
February 25, 2010 at 17:25:32
The 'compatibility' of the motherrboard is not likely a factor. You're just sticking a motherboard in a case. It's only coincidently an emachine case. Now, any emachine restore disks may not be compatible but you haven't gotten that far yet. For the restore disks to work you'll need the same model motherboard AND it'll need an Emachine-branded bios.

Also, the front panel LED connections won't cause that problem even if they're hooked up wrong. You just need the power switch connection to be correct. If you have front panel USB connections they may or may not be the same and it's probably best to leave them disconnected if you have any question.

The only possible incompatibility is with the cpu you're using. Make sure it's compatible with the motherboard.

You're not really green until you're soylent green.


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#5
February 25, 2010 at 18:42:55
I appreciate ALL of your replies. I'm going to get back to work on it again tomorrow and I'll let you know what happens. My other problem is this ~ I heard that I might be able to keep all/most of the files on my hard drive. How would I be able to do that?

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#6
February 25, 2010 at 21:01:01
"My other problem is this ~ I heard that I might be able to keep all/most of the files on my hard drive. How would I be able to do that?"

You can install the same hard drive on another computer and boot from it, and not lose any files, however, if the mboard hardware is more than a little different from your old mboard, it is common for XP to NOT load Windows all the way !
Typically, you see the normal video while booting, then the first bit of Windows graphics, then a black screen, blinking cursor top left, and nothing further happens.
IF AND ONLY IF you have an OEM XP CD, or the equivalent Recovery disk (some brand name system Recovery CDs are actually slightly modified regular XP CDs) , then you can fix that situation, and not lose any of your personal settings and data that you have added to the Windows partition on the drive, by running a Repair installation of Windows procedure. HOWEVER, nothing can go wrong during Setup when you do that that prevents you from completing Setup, otherwise Windows itself will be trashed (the rest of the data is still there and can be copied to elsewhere), and you probably won't be able to chose to Repair your existing Windows installation again when boot from the XP CD.

I prefer to call a Repair installation of Windows procedure a Repair Setup.
How to do an XP Repair Setup, step by step:
http://www.windowsreinstall.com/win...

You will need a Windows CD of the same version as the one of your Windows installation - Home or Pro, whichever applies - and the Product Key, preferably the one that was used to install it, but it can be one for the same version as the one of your Windows installation.
In most cases you get the Product Key from the official Microsoft sticker on your computer case (in this case, you can use use the Product Key on the label on the emachines case) , or from the official Microsoft sticker that came with your Windows CD if it has not been stuck to the case, or if you can't find that or don't have that, you can use a program to find the Product Key your Windows installation is presently using, BEFORE you run the Repair Setup (Repair install) - e.g. search for: keyfinder, by Jelly Bean whatever.

NOTE that the XP CD MUST be a regular CD that is an OEM version (it says " For Distribution with a New PC only" or similar on it) or be one of the Recovery CDs for your emachines system (if it's actually a slightly modified XP CD), in order for Setup to accept the Product Key on the emachines case ! !

If the mboard on the other computer is different, you will need to load all the drivers for the mboard after Setup is finished.

.......after Setup is finished you must load the drivers for the mboard, particularly the main chipset drivers, in order for Windows to have the proper drivers for and information about your mboard hardware, including it's AGP or PCI-E, ACPI, USB 2.0 if it has it, and hard drive controller support. If you have a generic system and have the CD that came with the mboard, all the necessary drivers are on it. If you load drivers from the web, brand name system builders and mboard makers often DO NOT have the main chipset drivers listed in the downloads for your model - in that case you must go to the maker of the main chipset's web site, get the drivers, and load them.

Load the main chipset drivers first.


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#7
February 26, 2010 at 06:19:35
I appreciate all of your invaluable information. I'm going to try all of these when I get home from work.

My brand new Emachine from WalMart did not come with any restore/recovery disks.


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#8
February 26, 2010 at 07:06:59
"My brand new Emachine from WalMart did not come with any restore/recovery disks."

We hear similar from people nearly every day on this site, or, they have no idea where the disks that came with the computer are now, or they bought the computer second hand and it didn't come with disks. We hear from people who DO have the Recovery disks, or have have made them themselves, a lot less often.

When you buy an el-cheapo system such as an emachines one, you may not get any restore/recovery disks with it.
HP and Compaq and Dell systems, e.g. usually come with the disks, but people often lose track of where they put them, and when the computer was bought second hand, the disks are often not included.

The most common reasons people don't have Recovery Disks or similar, when the brand name computer didn't come with them, is they weren't paying attention, or they didn't bother to find out whether they could make them, or they knew about the program to make them but just didn't bother to make a set. All computers these days come burner drives - all it takes is a little effort and the purchase of a few burnable disks, which people often already have purchased for burning otherwise.

There is/was probably an emachines supplied program in your All Programs list somewhere with which you can make the Recovery Disks while Windows and the computer are working fine. Info about that is probably in a Owner's or Users guide or manual that is probably also in your All Programs list somewhere. (However, sometimes you're only allowed to make the set once.)
Also, for a limited amount of time, say, within 3 to 5 years after the model first came out, you can order a Recovery Disk set (they call it Recovery Media) from the emachines web site, probably for a lot less including shipping than it costs to buy an OEM XP Home CD, the cheapest way to buy XP.

A friend of mine bought a new emachines desktop computer about 5 years ago, and he was surprised to find that via messages that he had a limited amount of time to make the Recovery Disk set, or similar, otherwise he would no longer be allowed to use Windows - so he made a set as soon as he could. I think that was a very good idea of emachines to do that, since people often neglect to make the set, but it seems that's no longer the case - some people probably objected to be forced to have to do that.
..........

There's probably nothing wrong with the data on your hard drive.


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#9
March 1, 2010 at 09:37:01

I'm doing these steps one by one.
Grasshopper: I disconnected everything and took 1 of the 2 sticks of RAM out. This is my first time hooking up a motherboard so I didn't know whether I should connect the hard drive or not, so I didn't. The computer turned on and both fans were spinning. So I put the other stick of RAM in there and same thing, computer stayed on and both fans were running. Then I gave the hard drive power and connected it to the Mobo and problem as when I started: fans spin for 1 or 2 seconds, giving me a short beep and fans stop spinning.
I'm not sure what you meant by connecting the monitor to the onboard video out.

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#10
March 1, 2010 at 14:37:25
"I didn't know whether I should connect the hard drive or not, so I didn't."

You can't boot from the hard if it's not connected, but you don't need to connect it to determine whether the mboard is booting OK. You should see text on the screen while booting if there's nothing wrong. You may get an error message, but you should see text in any case.

The fans and hard drive spinning doesn't necessarily indicate there's nothing wrong with the power supply and/or the mboard.

Did the computer shop use the same ram you were using on the original mboard, or did they supply you with other ram ??

It is easy to test for whether it's only the ram that is your problem.
If you have installed ram that was not installed and working fine in this mboard previously, it may not be compatible with your mboard. It is easy to test for incompatible ram that has caused your mboard to fail to boot.

Make sure you have a speaker or speakers or the equivalent connected to the mboard so you can hear mboard beeps (see your mboard manual if you need to).
Remove the AC power to the case/power supply.
Remove all the ram.
Restore AC power.
Try to boot.
If nothing else is wrong, you will get no video but you will hear a pattern of beeps that indicate no ram is installed, or a ram problem.
E.g. for an Award bios or a bios based on one, that's often a beep of about a half second, silence for a half second, a beep of about a half second, silence for a half second, continuously.
.....

"fans spin for 1 or 2 seconds, giving me a short beep "

The fans should spin all the time the computer is running, if there's nothing wrong, but some power supplies have a temp controlled fan or two of them, and they may spin slower when the computer interior is cooler, and a cpu fan may spin slower when the computer interior is cooler.

There must be a 3 wire female connector from a 3 wire fan, it's supposed to be the cpu fan, connected to the 3 pin header for a cpu fan on the mboard, otherwise the mboard will often shut off automatically when no rpm is detected from the cpu fan header, within a very short time, to prevent the cpu (processor) from burning out.

One short beep is normal.
No beeps or a long beep or any other pattern of beeps is not normal, if the ram installed is compatible and is not damaged and has a good connectoin in it's slot(s) , and the video adapter is fine.
........

"I'm not sure what you meant by connecting the monitor to the onboard video out"

Your D865GVHZ has onboard video, and no AGP slot, but it has 3 PCI slots.

If you have a PCI video card in a PCI slot (a PCI slot is usually white or creme colored, there may be more than one) usually the onboard video port on that mboard WILL STILL produce video when there is a PCI video card in a slot.

If you suspect you might have a problem with a PCI video card that's in a slot, and you have a mboard that has onboard video, then you can try removing the video card that's in a slot, and connecting your monitor to the port for the onboard video.
.........

If you bought the W2646 in North America, you had one of 4 possible mboards.
All were made by Trigem, or were not made by them but are exclusive to Trigem, the same Korean company that actually made the emachines system.
Unofficial mboards info:
http://www.e4allupgraders.info/dir1...

Manuals for three of the four mboards are available at the end of the Downloads on the left side of the screen. If theone for yours is there, you can check your wiring connections to the mboard, etc., in that.
NOTE that that web site may have suspended allowing downloads - donate to it if you can afford to.

All of them:
Chipset: Intel 82845GL / 82801DB / 82802AB
Processor Socket Type: mPGA478
Processor Family: Pentium 4 (Northwood, Willamette)
Maximum Processor Core Frequency: >=2.2 GHz Northwood; 2.0G Hz Willamette
Processor Front Side Bus Frequency: 400/533 MHz
.......

Retail mboards made by Intel are often also OEM supplied to brand name system builders and in that case the Intel made mboard almost always has the brand name's bios version on it rather than an Intel version.

Does the D865GVHZ have an Intel bios version, or another brand name bios version??

If you had video, the bios string that's displayed while booting will indicate whether it has an Intel bios version or a brand name bios version.

the bios string is usually a long string of numbers/letters at the bottom of the first black screen as you boot your computer - it often begins with a date - usually you can press the Pause key to read it and copy it down.
Press any key but Pause to continue booting.

Newer Phoenix bios strings, based most often on those for Intel mboards, are often like so: xxxxxxxx.xxx.xxxxxxxxx and have no date at the beginning of them.

An Intel bios version:

The first TWO sections of the BIOS Version indicate the BIOS ID code (in the example: SGP4510H.86A).
If the number in the middle of the string is NOT 86A, it's another brand name bios version.

The key you press to get into an Intel bios version's Setup is F2; it may NOT be F2 for a another brand name bios version.
......

I'm assuming it has an Intel bios version.

The D865GVHZ has a newer main chipset than your original mboard.

The ram and the cpu you were using on the original mboard may or may not work properly with the D865GVHZ.

Cpu support list for the D865GVHZ
http://www.cpu-upgrade.com/mb-Intel...

The cpu you are using must be in the list, and preferably NOT one of the ones marked with yellow.
The highlighted blue numbers on the left are the Intel part number, and if you click on the highlighted blue numbers, you can find the Sxxxx model and what type of cpu it is - e.g.
Northwood, or Willamette.

The Sxxxx model, or the Intel part number, that's on the top of the cpu you're using, must be on the list.
See the notes at the top of the list for which bios version the mboard must have, or higher, to recognize the cpu properly.

You can't tell which specific bios version the mboard has unless you can get video, unless the mboard was new and the bios version is stated on a label on it's box, which usually isn't there anyway.

If the cpu you installed is not supported by all bios versions, then if the present bios version is not high enough, your mboard may not boot all the way. In that case, you, or the computer shop, must install a cpu the mboard already recognizes fine, and flash the bios to the latest non-beta bios update version available on the Intel web site.
......

It is also possible, if you are using the cpu that was in the original mboard, that the original BESTEC PS may have damaged the cpu as well as the original mboard while failing.



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#11
March 1, 2010 at 15:01:54
Tubesandwires:

My motherboard blew as I said in my original question, the computer shop replaced it with the Intel Desktop.

The fans NOT spinning when I was turning it on is a problem. I noticed today when I had the hard drive unhooked that the PSU and the heatsink fan started to spin.

I'm going to try the IDE cables that came with the new motherboard. The problem is the motherboard came with an SATA cable that I cant use and one of the IDE cables is not long enough to reach to the CD drive.



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#12
March 1, 2010 at 15:31:18
OK, I got your Topic mixed up with another one. I modifed Response 10 to suit.

"I noticed today when I had the hard drive unhooked that the PSU and the heatsink fan started to spin."

The mboard should boot fine and you should get video when the hard drive isn't connected, as I said in response 10.



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#13
March 2, 2010 at 09:30:57
Ok....by accident I noticed a bios jumper block on the board. There are 3 pins and it had no jumper on it. I went to the manual and it said:
Jumper setting 1 and 2 - normal (default) - The BIOS uses the current configuration and passwords for
booting.
Jumper setting 2 and 3 - configure - After the Power-On Self-Test (POST) runs, the BIOS displays
the Maintenance Menu. Use this menu to clear passwords.
No jumper setting - recovery mode - The BIOS recovers data from a recovery diskette in the event
of a failed BIOS update.

So I grabbed a jumper off the old board and put it on jumpers 2-3 and the computer turned on with the fans running while the IDE cables were connected to the drives. For the first time since it died I saw words on the monitor regarding the BIOS but now here's the problem - my keyboard doesn't work! I cannot press any key to continue. Also the mouse will not work.

Thanks again for all advice!


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#14
March 2, 2010 at 19:25:33
Is this a used mboard or a new one?

The bios string is a long string of numbers/letters, usually it's at the bottom of the first black screen as you boot your computer -

Newer Phoenix bios strings, based most often on those for Intel mboards, are often like so: xxxxxxxx.xxx.xxxxxxxxx and have no date at the beginning of them.

"An Intel bios version:

The first TWO sections of the BIOS Version indicate the BIOS ID code (in the example: SGP4510H.86A.xxxxxxx)"

Is the second part 86A, or something else ??

If it's 86A, quote the first string, the part before 86A !
.......

"So I grabbed a jumper off the old board.....

It should have already had a jumper on pins 1-2 ! !
Was there no jumper there ? ?

"....and put it on jumpers 2-3 "

Setting that to 2-3 is a temporary setting, useful only for clearing bios passwords according the the manual.
As I vaguely recall, it's also used with at least some Intel mboards to set the default cpu settings for a cpu after the cpu type has been changed.

Remove the AC power to the computer, place the jumper on 1-2.

(If won't boot again, you probably need to update the bios version.)

"....my keyboard doesn't work! I cannot press any key to continue. Also the mouse will not work."

Usually a mouse DOES NOT work in the bios Setup. Read the directions for what keyboard key does what at the bottom of each screen in Setup.

A simple adapter that plugs into the connector on the end of a cord to adapt to another type of port connection will NOT work if the keyboard or mouse is NOT a "combo" device.
See Response 1
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

If you're using a PS/2 keyboard, it must plug into the purple PS/2 port. A PS/2 keyboard should always work.

If you're using a PS/2 mouse, it must plug into a the green PS/2 port. A PS/2 mouse should always work.

A USB keyboard should work, but in order to get into the bios Setup, USB Legacy devices or similar must be enabled in the bios.

Your manual says, in Setup

Advanced - USB Configuration

High speed USB - Enabled (default)
Legacy USB Support - Enabled (default)

If Legacy USB Support is disabled, you can only get into the bios Setup with a PS/2 keyboard.
Removing the mboard battery, with the AC power to the PS removed, replacing the battery, will set the bios to defaults, and a USB keyboard should be able to get into the bios.
.......

A USB mouse will NOT work while booting into Windows the first time, if a USB mouse was not connected the previous boot. You see the cursor for it, but it won't move.
- If you have to Logon to Windows while booting, use the Tab key on the keyboard to toggle the active selection - dashes or dots are around the active selection, or it it will be highlighted.
Press Enter if there is no password for the user.
or - if there is a Password, type it, then press Enter.
A short time after Windows loads the desktop it will load the USB mouse drivers, and the mouse will work in Windows and while booting into Windows after that (as long as you don't boot with it not plugged in - then you may have to use the Tab key again the next time you plug it in while booting into Windows).
- if you don't need to Logon, a short time after Windows loads the desktop it will load the USB mouse drivers, and the mouse will work in Windows and while booting into Windowsafter that.

Similar applies to a wireless mouse or keyboard - usually it will NOT work while booting into Windows the first time, if it's transmitter/receiver wasn't plugged in previously. READ the installation DIRECTIONS for it ! !
.........

If the hard drive that already has Windows on it won't boot all the way into Windows , see Response 6 !


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#15
March 3, 2010 at 06:03:46
Tubesandwires:

This board is a brand new one.
The BIOS string is: BF86510A.86.0075.P24.0503071605

The motherboard came with no jumpers on the BIOS pins. So I should switch it from 2-3 to 1-2 ?

I'm using a PS2 keyboard. When I booted it up with jumpers on 2-3, it said "USB Legacy Enabled". Should it work after I switch the jumpers or do you think I'm having another problem? Do you think taking the battery out and putting it back in will fix it?

Thanks again!!!


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#16
March 3, 2010 at 12:03:48
"This board is a brand new one.
The BIOS string is: BF86510A.86.0075.P24.0503071605"

Probably should be

BF86510A.86A.0075.P24.0503071605

In that case, it definately has an Intel bios version - second one down here:
http://downloadmirror.intel.com/101...

In that case the Intel cpu support list info applies, and you can use Intel bios updates,

but ....

- NEVER flash the bios unless you find specific info in bios update release notes that it will cure a problem your having (e.g. if the same specific bios update worked fine with the same cpu previously, flashing the bios will NOT cure your problem) , or unless you MUST flash the bios to have it support recognizing a newer cpu that's listed in the cpu support list because your present bios version isn't high enough.
- if you DO flash the bios, use the newest non-beta (beta = has not been fully tested; final or no label = it has been fully tested) bios version - usually the latest bios version includes all the fixes and cpu support enhancements that were in previous bios updates.

"The motherboard came with no jumpers on the BIOS pins. "

As I said above...
"It should have already had a jumper on pins 1-2 ! !"

Either someone at the factory forgot to install it - unlikely - or the someone at the computer repair place had removed it ???

"So I should switch it from 2-3 to 1-2 ? "

Yes !

"I'm using a PS2 keyboard."

It must be plugged into the purple PS/2 port.
Also see the PS/2 keyboard related info, and the part about using a simple adapter, in Response 14.

NOTE that I've seen that some keyboards have a extra button that toggles the Fx keys on / off (x = a number, any of 1 to 12) - if the Fx keys have been toggled off, they don't work while booting, AND I've seen one keyboard where you have to press that button while booting to active the Fx keys in any case. If the has the button, it also has an led that indicates whether the Fx keys are enabled (lit) or not (not lit).

If you had it plugged into the green port, a PS/2 mouse in the purple port, that doesn't harm them,
however.....
- PS/2 device connections (and most video cable connections, and serial port connections) are NOT "hot pluggable" - DO NOT unplug or plug them in when the computer is running, or there's a small possibilty the device or the (PS/2) port circuits could be damaged.
- if you DO plug them in or unplug them when the computer is running, the PS/2 (or serial port connected) device usually will NOT work until you have rebooted anyway !

" When I booted it up with jumpers on 2-3, it said "USB Legacy Enabled". "

That indicates the bios is set to the default regarding that - a USB keyboard will work to get into the Bios Setup and will work in Setup (if the USB controller is enabled in the bios as well - it is by default) .

"Should it work after I switch the jumpers or do you think I'm having another problem? "

I would think it should work when the jumper is on 2-3, but I don't know. I do have at least one older system here that has an Intel mboard (with a Packard Bell bios version on it) but's not ready to run at the moment.

You should jumper 1-2.

"Do you think taking the battery out and putting it back in will fix it? "

You could try that, but try the jumper on 1-2 first.
.......

If you do remove the battery

"Removing the mboard battery, with the AC power to the PS removed, replacing the battery, will set the bios to defaults..."

Wait, say, 5 minutes, before you replace the battery.

The first time you boot after that you will get a "Cmos Checksum Error...." or similar message. You will either be prompted to enter the bios Setup or you will automatically go there. Enter the bios Setup, and set the current date and time, save settings, reboot.
.........

You use the F2 key to get into the Intel bios Setup.

Press F2 repeatedly while booting the computer, don't hold down the key, starting right after the mboad beeps once, or right after the monitor led changes from it's "standby" color to the color it is when you have video.

NOTE that I've seen that some keyboards have a extra button that toggles the Fx keys on / off (x = a number, any of 1 to 12) - if the Fx keys have been toggled off, they don't work while booting, AND I've seen one keyboard where you have to press that button while booting to active the Fx keys in any case. If the has the button, it also has an led that indicates whether the Fx keys are enabled (lit) or not (not lit).



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#17
March 3, 2010 at 16:39:00
Tubesandwires:

I wish I was as smart as you.

I put the jumper on 1-2. I turned the computer on and the same original problem was going on, the PSU and heatsink spin for a second then computer shuts down. I completely disconnected the CDrom and floppy drive, all I had hooked up was the IDE to the hard drive and the power to the hard drive. Same thing, shut down. I removed the power from the hard drive but left the IDE in and the computer went to the same BIOS screen as before. I haven't fixed the keyboard yet. Bleh. This is a huge learning process for me.


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#18
March 4, 2010 at 12:18:29
Was the box or bag the mboard was in still sealed up when you got it - you had to cut or remove tape or some seal to get inside the box or to remove the mboard from the bag ? ? Or was it sealed but the computer shop guy opened it up in your presence ??

Your Response 9:
"The computer turned on and both fans were spinning. So I put the other stick of RAM in there and same thing, computer stayed on and both fans were running. Then I gave the hard drive power and connected it to the Mobo and problem as when I started: fans spin for 1 or 2 seconds, giving me a short beep and fans stop spinning."

Your Response 11:
"I noticed today when I had the hard drive unhooked that the PSU and the heatsink fan started to spin. "

It sounds like the ram is not causing the problem directly.
- If you connected only the power and not the data cable to the hard drive, the hard drive's board is probably fried - shorted !
- If you hooked up the data cable too, if the problem does not happen when only the power cable is connected to the drive, the data cable is damaged (that wouln't likely cause your symptoms unless wires were shorted) , or the board on the drive is damaged (much more likely). Even if it's possible the data connector for the drive could be backwards on one end (it might not be possible) , the hard drive won't boot if that's wrong, but that probably would not cause your symptoms, unless the drive's board was fried.

I said Response 12:

""I noticed today when I had the hard drive unhooked that the PSU and the heatsink fan started to spin.""

"The mboard should boot fine and you should get video when the hard drive isn't connected, as I said in response 10."

You said last Response:
" I completely disconnected the CDrom and floppy drive, all I had hooked up was the IDE to the hard drive and the power to the hard drive. Same thing, shut down. I removed the power from the hard drive but left the IDE in and the computer went to the same BIOS screen as before.

Sure sounds like the power connections on the hard drive's board are fried !

The CD drive and floppy drive probably are not the problem, however, I've seen that they can get damaged while a power supply is failing, more often than a hard drive does, if the PS shorts or the voltages go way too high before the PS dies.

For the time being, don't connect the floppy drive, CD drive, or or the hard drive, or their data cables, or power connectors, to the mboard / power supply.
Try the jumper set to 1-2, and 2-3. Install at least 1 ram module. There must be a 3 wire female connector from a 3 wire fan, it's supposed to be the cpu fan, connected to the 3 pin header for a cpu fan on the mboard.
Tell us what happens.

Assuming connecting the defective hard drive has not already damaged the mboard, the PS/2 keyboard should work in the bios.
You MAY need to jumper to 2-3, Save bios settings, before jumpering 1-2 will produce a good result.
Are you certain it's plugged into the purple PS/2 port?
Try the subject PS/2 keyboard with another computer to make sure it still works.
Do you have or can you borrow another PS/2 or USB keyboard?
If the PS/2 circuits are damaged, the USB circuits may work fine.

If neither a PS/2 or USB keyboard will work, that have the connector built onto the end of their cord, with those other things disconnected, the mboard may be damaged, or the power supply may be damaged.

Failing or damaged PSs often still partially work.
The only way to rule out the power supply fpr sure is to try it with another known working computer.

If you can get a keyboard to work in the bios (both USB ports and PS/2 ports require the PS is putting out +5v) check the current voltage readings in the bios for +3.3v, +5v, and +12v - they should be within 10% of the nominal value. If any are not within 10%, damaged mboards can produce false readings in the bios. If you can connect the PS to a known working computer, check the current voltages in the working computer's bios. If any are still not within 10%, the PS is damaged.
.......

If that doesn't help...look here:

Desktop Boards
Troubleshooting system boot issues
http://www.intel.com/support/mother...
.............

You may have a ram problem

Don't connect the floppy drive, CD drive, the or hard drive, or their data cables, or power connectors, to the mboard / power supply.
Try the jumper set to 1-2

Make sure you have a speaker or speakers or the equivalent connected to the mboard so you can hear mboard beeps (see your mboard manual if you need to).
Remove the AC power to the case/power supply.
Remove all the ram.
Restore AC power.
Try to boot.
If nothing else is wrong, you will get no video but you will hear a pattern of beeps that indicate no ram is installed, or a ram problem.
E.g. for an Award bios or a bios based on one, that's often a beep of about a half second, silence for a half second, a beep of about a half second, silence for a half second, continuously.

if you hear no beeps,
- don't connect the floppy drive, CD drive, the or hard drive, or their data cables, or power connectors, to the mboard / power supply.
Try the jumper set to 2-3.
Try the above again.
.....


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#19
March 10, 2010 at 08:36:56
Sorry about the delay ~ I've been taking a few days off away from the motherboard that's driving me nuts. :)

I called the computer repair shop that originally ordered the new motherboard for me. I told them I was having problems getting it to boot up. They told me that they had tested the board when it came in and it booted up no problems with their keyboard. For some reason I thought I had taken the motherboard out of the antistatic package myself....this explains why the jumper was missing off of the bios settings on the board. I asked them about that and they mentioned they take it off because of the clock?

So I'm taking the computer back to them today. They originally told me the ONLY problem with the compuer was the motherboard was fried. They said they'll look at it and let me know what the problem is and I'll post it and let you know. :)


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#20
March 10, 2010 at 10:47:35
Okay.
Tell them it appears the hard drive is fried.

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#21
March 11, 2010 at 09:24:09
The computer repair shop told me that because of the way that I hooked it up, I fried the hard drive myself. I was working in a static free environment. How could I have fried it? They also told me when they originally diagnosed the computer, that they never tested the hard drive, only the motherboard. But I wanted to save what was on the hard drive, that is why I purchased a power supply and a new motherboard. So the way I attempted to hook it up with the IDE cable fried it?

Could it have been possible that when the PSU blew, taking out the motherboard, that it took out the hard drive also?


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#22
March 11, 2010 at 11:08:47
So - did they determine whether the mboard is now damaged ?
- does their keyboard work with it?
- does your keyboard work with it?

"The computer repair shop told me that because of the way that I hooked it up, I fried the hard drive myself."

That's extremely unlikely. The only way you could fry the hard drive yourself is......

- if you connected the 4 wire molex power connector to the drive upside down - that's extremely unlikely because the connector and the power socket are designed such that the connector will go into the socket only one way - installing it upside down can be done but would require you would have to use considerable force to plug in the connector.

- you plugged the IDE cable connector onto the pins on the IDE header on the drive or on the mboard such that it wasn't on all the pins - that's not possible if the IDE header has a plastic shroud around it that confines where the connector can be installed. Plugging in the IDE connector backwards on one IDE header connection results in the IDE drive not working, and you may get a delay while booting, or the boot may stall forever, or other oddball symptoms, but that does no harm to the hard drive. Same goes for connecting a floppy drive data cable connector backwards (in that case the floppy led is on all the time the computer is running, as well as the floppy drive doesn't work).

- you plugged in or unplugged the power connector to the hard drive while the power supply had live AC power to it - even more unlikely - I once fried a power supply when I did that, but I have never damaged a hard drive by doing that.

- the data cable is damaged such that two or more wires are shorted together - I have never damaged a hard drive when any data cable was damaged - the hard drive just doesn't work in that case.

- you have a 40 pin header on an old sound card that's for an ancient proprietary Panasonic CD drive, and you plugged an IDE hard drive into that header - I've done that by accident - the IDE drive wouldn't spin up, but it did no harm to the IDE drive. That might fry the IDE drive if it was plugged into the Panasonic sound card cdrom header for a longer time, but it's likely you don't have such an old sound card, and all the ones I know of are ISA cards, and your mboard has no ISA slots.

"So the way I attempted to hook it up with the IDE cable fried it?"

That's NOT possible, unless
- there no is no plastic shroud around the pins on the mboard IDE header that confines where the connector can plug in,
- the data cable is damaged such that two or more wires are shorted together .

"Could it have been possible that when the PSU blew, taking out the motherboard, that it took out the hard drive also?"

For a, probably, BESTEC power supply in an emachines computer, that's the most likely thing.

"...they never tested the hard drive,..."

Then they have no idea whether the hard drive was already fried, and no justification to say you fried the drive yourself.


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#23
March 11, 2010 at 14:21:56
I think these guys are trying to scam me. First he mentioned something about the IDE cables and it would cost me $75. He didn't say anything about my hard drive being blown at that point. I finally asked him if my hard drive was fried and he said "you could say that". So I really still don't know if my hard drive is salvageable or not. How could I tell if anything is left on my hard drive? I really don't trust these guys anymore. I'm going to try to get my money back from the motherboard that they might have given to me used being that it was opened and had jumpers missing and who knows what else.
Thank you TubesAndWires for all of your time and wisdom.

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#24
March 11, 2010 at 15:58:33
So - did they determine whether the mboard is now damaged ?

- does their keyboard work with it?
- does your keyboard work with it?

As I said in Response 18....

"" You said last Response:
I completely disconnected the CDrom and floppy drive, all I had hooked up was the IDE to the hard drive and the power to the hard drive. Same thing, shut down. I removed the power from the hard drive but left the IDE in and the computer went to the same BIOS screen as before.""

"Sure sounds like the power connections on the hard drive's board are fried ! "

If the mboard is okay you could get another hard drive and
- if you have or if you can borrow or can make a copy of an OEM XP CD of the same version as was on the hard drive, Home, or Pro, as far as Microsoft is concerned it's perfectly legal for you to use that OEM CD to install XP on your hard drive, and you use the Product Key that's on the official Microsoft label that's on the outside of the emachines case along with the CD.

An OEM XP CD has " For distribution with a new PC Only" or similar printed on the CD's surface.

NOTE that if the new hard drive is larger than 137gb manufacturer's size, the XP CD MUST have SP1 or later updates included on it in order for Setup and Windows to be able to recognize the full size of the drive. XP CDs with SP2 or SP3 updates included have SP2 or SP3 printed on the CD. All the original XP CDs I've seen that have SP1 updates included DO NOT have SP1 printed on the CD, but you can search on the web using the volume label of the CD - the label you see for the CD in My Computer or Windows Explorer - to determine whether it has SP1 updates or no SP updates.

If the CD has no SP updates, if the hard drive is larger than 137gb, you MUST make yourself a "silpstreamed" CD that has had the SP3 updates integrated into the original contents of the original CD, along with the original Product Key, to install XP on the drive.

- If you don't have or can't get that OEM CD, thecheapest solution is you could buy yourself an OEM XP Home SP3 CD off the web, or some local places that build new systems and repair computers have it.

Setup defaults to making only one partition on a hard drive.
The problem with that is if you ever need to re-load Windows from scratch, you lose everything on the partition Windows was installed on, and when you have only partition on the hard drive, that's everything on the drive - unless you copy the data you don't want to lose to elsewhere BEFORE you install Windows from scratch (most people don't bother, and lose all their data) .
If you're installing XP from a regular CD, it's recommended you make at least TWO partitions on the drive.
How to make more than one partition on a hard drive, when you're installing Windows on a blank hard drive, or when you are deleting the existing partition(s) on a hard drive before you run Setup .....
See Response 3:
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...


- since you did not buy the same mboard as the one that fried, you probably can't use the Restore or Recovery CDs for your emachines model to re-load it's orginal software installation - the first CD will probably check to see if the mboard has an emachines bios version, and when it finds doesn't, the program will quit.
.......

Whenever you load Windows from a regular Windows CD (or DVD) from scratch, after Setup is finished you must load the drivers for the mboard, particularly the main chipset drivers, in order for Windows to have the proper drivers for and information about your mboard hardware, including it's AGP or PCI-E, ACPI, USB 2.0 if it has it, and hard drive controller support. If you have a generic system and have the CD that came with the mboard, all the necessary drivers are on it. If you load drivers from the web, brand name system builders and mboard makers often DO NOT have the main chipset drivers listed in the downloads for your model - in that case you must go to the maker of the main chipset's web site, get the drivers, and load them.

Load the main chipset drivers first.
.......

In your case, get the drivers from the Intel web site for your mboard model.

If the internet doesn't work when Setup has finished, you will need to get at least the network adapter drivers for your model on another computer, and install them on your computer.


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#25
March 11, 2010 at 16:38:14
the machine I on currently is what is left of my neighbors t2080,
which I believe is older than the posters. Just went down to the
basement do dig up the restore cd which I never used but, still
have (the neighbor gave it to me). Put it in the cd drive to look
what is on it. The largest file on it approximately 645mb is
t2080.GHO, I don't believe this is a OEM and the posters isn't
likely one either. If that is the only OS you have, than you don't
have one.

larry


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