does hdd always spin

Hewlett-packard Hp/compaq 104660-001 har...
August 11, 2010 at 01:34:59
Specs: Windows XP
should the hdd keep spinning even if no programes being excuted?

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#1
August 11, 2010 at 01:51:26
Yes it does, from the moment the computer boots to the moment it switches of.

Hard disk spins at 7500 rpm and sometimes more. If they were to be stopped when not in use it would slow thing down considerably. Every time you tried to access the hard disk there would be a distinct delay as the disk got up to speed and stabilised not to mention wear and tear.

A disk that is spinning at a constant rate for long periods will last a lot longer than one that is continually being run down and run up to speed again.

Stuart


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#2
August 11, 2010 at 04:43:22
The exception to the above is if you have placed the computer in one of the power saving modes that allows the hard drive to stop.

The typical hard drive is rated to have an average failure time of at least 100,000hrs. That is over 11 years. Some drive series have an average failure time of over a million hours.

Unfortunately this means that some may fail right away while others will seem to run forever.

Failure can mean different things. Data corruption that is correctable wouldn't be considered a failure.

Back up your data.


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#3
August 11, 2010 at 07:10:48
"The exception to the above is if you have placed the computer in one of the power saving modes that allows the hard drive to stop."

You can set settings in Control Panel - Power such that the hard drive shuts off - stops spinning - after xx minutes of inactivity. If you do nothing that requires accessing the hard drive for a while and exceed that time, the hard drive stops spinning and you're then running Windows entirely from the ram. When you then do something that requires accessing the hard drive, there is a short delay while the hard drive spins up again.


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Related Solutions

#4
August 11, 2010 at 07:28:38
IMO, solid state drives are a waste of money. A 64GB SSD costs about $100+/-, a 1TB "conventional" HDD costs about $60.

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#5
August 11, 2010 at 07:45:58
I agree with jam on SSDs. The only advantage is faster times, which is not that important to me. These devices will prove to fail, just as flash drives do. The type of memory in SSDs has a finite number of cycles before failure.


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