Solved disk defrag, reducing hard disk noise

July 27, 2012 at 11:34:40
Specs: Windows XP, 512MB
Hi,

Just a quick question fellas, will hard disk defragment reduce noise level on the hard disk? Knowing it's a healthy drive.

Thanks in advance.

Regards.


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✔ Best Answer
July 27, 2012 at 14:15:35
With a platter drive not SSD, the noise is reduced marginally with a defrag because the drive does not have to work as hard to find data.

If your hdd is making exceptrional noise it is because it is an old drive that has been used extensively and is nearing its "use by date" or it has a fault in the mechanism. You should back up the drive periodically to an external hdd if you have data that is of importance to you. Purchase a new drive when possible and do a Files & Transfer to the new drive.

In ther meantime, do a CHKDSK /F in the cmd run box dialog to check and fix the drive of errors. If you have any bad sectors, the OS will kick up errors about Page_Fault.

Usually, though, if you do extensive programming or Video editing/compiling, those type of projects do give harsh impact on a hdd as it is using a lot of resources to do the chore so you will hear a type of grinding or whirring noise during the compilation.

Also, too many Virtual drives will also give problems to a hdd as the virtual drives do exist as part of the "Free Space" of a hdd.

As well as, if you run your PC as a server for games then that, too, will impact on the hddd and its capabilities to cope.

If the Defrag Analyse shows only 10% fragmentation then it is advisable to do a defrag even though the message syas it is not warranted. 10% is rather a large amoun lkike an 80gb hdd, it would be 8gb of fragmentations. Better to defrag a small amount (might take about 5 to 20 minutes) than waiting for 6 hours to defrag at 30% or more.

Try to ensure that your Primary drive has at least 15% Free Space to allow proficiency of the OS.



#1
July 27, 2012 at 11:41:59
hard disk defragmentation has nothing to do with the noise of the hard disk !! If your computer's hard disk is making noise, then you should check if it has gone bad by many test !!

Solving Technical queries is my passion and I just Love it !!


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#2
July 27, 2012 at 11:46:49
What sort of checks?
I've done AV.
Many cleaning.
Checking connectors, testing HDD.
Clean boot, etc.
Nothing wrong with the hard, but, it was more than 10% (as they say) fragmented, so I did a clean boot, stopped virtual memory, then ran defrag.
What else do you suggest?

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#3
July 27, 2012 at 12:17:04
Are you saying the hard drive was only 10% full, or 90% full? If too full the hard drive will need to work a little longer to find places to write to. As stated though, should not be noisy.

I have seen tool free cases with noisy drives. I attribute that to a loose fit and vibration.

How are you testing the drive? Use the fitness test designed for that drive. Enable SMART in the BIOS too.


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Related Solutions

#4
July 27, 2012 at 13:04:43
I checked the connector with multimeter, opened the case (desktop) no loose screws etc.
I meant percent file fragmentation, like 2%, 10% etc.

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#5
July 27, 2012 at 14:15:35
✔ Best Answer
With a platter drive not SSD, the noise is reduced marginally with a defrag because the drive does not have to work as hard to find data.

If your hdd is making exceptrional noise it is because it is an old drive that has been used extensively and is nearing its "use by date" or it has a fault in the mechanism. You should back up the drive periodically to an external hdd if you have data that is of importance to you. Purchase a new drive when possible and do a Files & Transfer to the new drive.

In ther meantime, do a CHKDSK /F in the cmd run box dialog to check and fix the drive of errors. If you have any bad sectors, the OS will kick up errors about Page_Fault.

Usually, though, if you do extensive programming or Video editing/compiling, those type of projects do give harsh impact on a hdd as it is using a lot of resources to do the chore so you will hear a type of grinding or whirring noise during the compilation.

Also, too many Virtual drives will also give problems to a hdd as the virtual drives do exist as part of the "Free Space" of a hdd.

As well as, if you run your PC as a server for games then that, too, will impact on the hddd and its capabilities to cope.

If the Defrag Analyse shows only 10% fragmentation then it is advisable to do a defrag even though the message syas it is not warranted. 10% is rather a large amoun lkike an 80gb hdd, it would be 8gb of fragmentations. Better to defrag a small amount (might take about 5 to 20 minutes) than waiting for 6 hours to defrag at 30% or more.

Try to ensure that your Primary drive has at least 15% Free Space to allow proficiency of the OS.


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#6
July 27, 2012 at 16:55:25
eddiesawdust

How can you possibly know the age of this hard drive. There is no use by date on a hard drive.

The proper procedure to defrag is to analyze and IF you see a screen recommending defragging then you do it.

Noise is a relative thing. We don't even know if the hard drive is the source. If there is a disk in an optical drive it will make much more noise than any hard drive.

You need to think about your responses.


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#7
July 27, 2012 at 17:24:17
Eddie,

That's what I wanted to know, it will reduce the noise (as I guessed), but not much. (with HDD)
Nothing such as PAGE_FAULT or etc (I mean faults), the drive is healthy and plenty of free space, not used as server etc.
After defrag c: -a -v, I found (can't remember) high percent fragmentation.
This is I believe is common with Windows as ext0/ext1 in Linux (I was told) work totally different from ntfs or fat/fat16/fat32 so the drive less likely to wear out in long run (saving files).

And thanks for not jumping to conclusion and read my post, thought and were patient. Thank you.

Regards.


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