Disable onboard VGA on L7VMM?

Emachine T1600
September 25, 2006 at 19:22:29
Specs: XP SP 2, AMD K7 Athelon 1.4ghz
hello! I need to to find out how to disable an onboard VGA adapter. I recently purchased this motherboard, a L7VMM MOTHERBOARD. AMD K7 1.4ghz T1600. I've been trying to install an AGP Video Card (ASUS 9550 128mb). The onboard video card is a ProSavage3. It should, for all I know default to the AGP, but it doesn't. Essentially, the process goes is this: I uninstall my old card (the onboard) in windows. I disable it, too. Then I shutdown, plug the AGP in, reboot, and viola, it works. I install the drivers, and everythin seems peachy. BUT when I shut down the PC, that's when the trouble starts. I come back later to boot it up again, and there's no screen. It just says "no signal." It does this for the old card, too. I've tried other monitors, same situation. After I remove the the AGP card, it works fine again.

I've tried to disable it from the motherboard and the bios.
It doesn't work----- I'm to understand that this particular motherboard has NO jumper for disabling the onboard card. The bios is also missing an option like that. There is a "Shared Video Memory" option, but I can't set it to zero.

I've tried dumping the cmos memory, I've flashed new bios (there were a number of new options available after this), read the manual, configured it to exactly "how it should be" and it still doesn't work!



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#1
September 25, 2006 at 23:18:21
When you say 'It does this for the old card, too' do you mean you've tried another add-on card with the same results or do you mean the on-board video?

If this is the only add-on card you've tried, the problem may be with the card. Most likely the bios on the card is supposed to override the on-board video. Maybe it's not doing that. It's not a windows problem since it happens before windows starts to load.

Sometimes with those video problems it helps to clear the cmos and then add the card. Also, if there's a 'reset configuration data', enable that.


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#2
September 26, 2006 at 09:36:02
Sorry for the confusion. By "the old card" I meant the onboard one. Also, I haven't tried any other graphics cards... It's not a bad idea, though.
I have cleared the cmos a number of times, to no avail. However, I will try that "clear configuration data" option.
thanks!

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#3
September 26, 2006 at 10:36:21
I tried the "reset configuration" thing, and it still doesn't work.
But I noticed on the VGA utility that my onboard video comes with that the address of the card is listed as AGP? isn't the onboard a PCI (albeit not plugged into the PCI port)?

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#4
September 26, 2006 at 10:45:37
On a mboard with onboard video, your bios will often NOT autoselect AGP when you insert an AGP card - there is a setting in the bios somewhere to initialize AGP video first (default is often PCI) or to initialize a video card in an AGP slot first(default is often onboard video, whatever label they give it). There may also be a setting to assign an IRQ to AGP, but that usually isn't there in more recent bioses - it is assigned automatically.

If you don't do that, on some mboards you will get video (VGA video) until Windows starts to load, then the screen goes black and stays that way - Windows loads anyway, unseen. On some mboards with XP on them, you will get still get video in Windows but it's SVGA video, not AGP video.

Your Display in Windows should be set to a basic mode such as PCI VGA before you install the drivers for the card.

"I've tried to disable it from the motherboard and the bios.
It doesn't work----- I'm to understand that this particular motherboard has NO jumper for disabling the onboard card. "

There is usually no setting to disable the onboard video in the bios, with the possible exception of a setting I've seen on some Intel brand name mboards like the second example in the first paragraph. I have not seen any mboard that has a jumper that disables the onboard video since mboards for 486's. Usually the onboard video is disabled automatically by the bios when you plug in a card to the primary video card slot, in this case the AGP slot (although it may not be in this case if you had plugged in a PCI video card).

You can have no video at all in a situation like yours, assuming your card is properly plugged into it's slot and you have set the bios settings as above, and the monitor is plugged into the card, not the onboard video port, if the video isn't finding the monitor as a P&P one. With some cards, the monitor must be on before you start up the computer or the video won't find the monitor properly - if you power up both at the same time, the video doen't "know" what settings to use. With those cards, if you then press Reset and boot, the video will be fine.
Despite the blinking led on the monitor, you can often press F8 repeatedly while booting, you will then get the basic VGA video all cards use in the initial stages, and you can then select Enable VGA mode from the Safe Mode menu that appears.

When you get to the Desktop, go to Display - Settings - Advanced - Monitor - Properties - Driver - Update Driver - Install from a list or specific location - Don't Search - choose Plug and Play Monitor, or if you have the drivers for your monitor handy, Have Disk - point it to the location of the drivers, pick your model.

Then reboot normally - your video should be fine.

Take a look in Device Manager - Display Adapters. There should be no listing of your onboard video, with the possible exception of it being there but it is disabled because you disabled it before you installed the AGP card.
If there is a listing for your onboard video there that is not disabled, that means the mboard and the bios did not auto disable the onboard video when you installed the AGP card - Disable it (Un-installing it will not work - it will come back next boot).
If there is a listing there for your onboard video there that is already disabled, usually you can Uninstall that entry and it and the onboard video will not appear there thereafter.


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#5
September 26, 2006 at 12:22:58
To add to what T&W said, the on-board video is usually AGP, not PCI.

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#6
September 26, 2006 at 13:56:19
Let me re-explain:
With the onboard savage3 installed and running, everything is fine. I check device manager, and then right-click to disable it/uninstall it (i've tried both). It asks to restart. I do. Then, the machine re-boots into xp, finds the vga card, yada yada and asks me to help it find drivers. I say no thanks, shut the computer down. I install the AGP card. I reboot. This time, everything works. The screen comes up, XP loads, it asks for the drivers for the AGP card, etc. Everything installs fine. the card works fine.
I restart the machine. I enter BIOS, set it to initial-on AGP (not PCI), I enable PnP. I save and exit. Everything works fine, XP loads. then I shut down the machine. I turn it on again, but now NEITHER the AGP or the onboard WORK!!! the monitor comes up with "no signal." I shut it down, unplug the AGP Card, lo and behold: the original onboard vga works. I'm back at square one. It seems like the mobo lets the AGP take over, just once. I don't know... I've seen a lot of posts saying to set the BIOS Shared Video Memory to 0, but there is no option for zero, just 32, 16, 8, or 4mb.
I'm sure my cmos battery works, I've read the manual for the mobo, I know I've set the BIOS correctly.
Oh, and the onboard uses the AGP bus, not the PCI.
thanks for your help so far everyone! I hope this new explaination makes some difference.

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#7
September 26, 2006 at 15:28:59
Check in cmos for a VGA IRQ. Sometimes they'll be an IRQ jumper on the card also. That's the only thing I can think of, other than an inherent problem with the card.

I did a brief google search and found several complaints about the ATI/ASUS 9550, although none exactly as yours. The solution seems to be to get an Nvidia card.


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#8
September 26, 2006 at 16:12:38
"I've seen a lot of posts saying to set the BIOS Shared Video Memory to 0, but there is no option for zero, just 32, 16, 8, or 4mb."

If the onboard video is disabled correctly, those settings are ignored by the bios.

Did you do all of stuff I suggested in response 4??


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#9
September 26, 2006 at 16:46:45
yes, I see what you suggested. And yes, the display is fine. don't get me wrong, I've played oblivion with this card, it works great. the problem is when I reboot--i can tell by listening that the motherboard doesn't complete POST. It hovers between the two video cards. It does nothing. Then I unplug it, and it defaults back to the onboard vga.
My original vga is NOT listed in device manager (when i boot up with the AGP). Everything looks okay, the ATI utility works, the card WORKS.
My BIOS already is set by default to AGP.
I've installed the onboard video card and the AGP card drivers 100 times over...
I tried the F8 thing... to no avail.
PS I've tried other monitors, so it's no the monitor.
Thanks so far everybody!

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#10
September 26, 2006 at 17:57:40
"I tried the F8 thing... to no avail."

Okay then.
Try this. Unplug the computer, open up the case. If there is any card in the PCI slot next to the AGP slot, move it somewhere else. That slot is forced to share the IRQ of the video slot on most mboards, and the PCI card in that slot and the video can conflict with each other.


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#11
September 26, 2006 at 21:14:26
I actually did that. Originally there was a card in the PCI slot next to the AGP card. I moved it further away, thinking that might be the problem. I have the same problem.
But I'll try and remove it and change the IRQ addressing in the BIOS.

thanks!


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#12
September 26, 2006 at 22:52:13
"I've flashed new bios (there were a number of new options available after this),..."

IMPORTANT - After you flash the bios, you should always enter the bios Setup, and load Bios Defaults (of any kind) - save settings, reboot. You MUST do this in order for the bios update to be fully accepted by the mboard bios chip. Otherwise your user settings are a mixture of older and newer bios versions.
.....

"I tried the F8 thing... to no avail."

It is important to press it repeatedly, not hold down the key, starting just after the ram is counted, orif you can't see anything shortly after the boot starts - did you do that?
Try doing that with the AGP card out to get the gist of it, if you need to.

I've installed a couple of ATI cards lately that have done the same thing because they didn't (and Windows doesn't) recognize the monitor they were connected to as plug and play monitors - monitor just blinks it's led - but that F8, Enable VGA mode procedure allowed me to fix the problem.
.....

I looked at your manual - you should leave bios settings set to defaults, except

You could try turning off PNP OS Installed (No) in the bios if it is on (Yes), or visa versa. (PNP/PCI Configurations)

In the bios - Integrated Peripherals - Init Display First - what choices does it give you there? Only PCI slot or Integrated?
An AGP slot is not a PCI slot.
What did you set that to?
...

If you are not using one or both Com ports, you could disable one or both to free up the IRQ's they use for other devices. If you aren't using a PS/2 mouse, or you are but you could use a USB or serial mouse instead, turn off the PS/2 mouse support in the bios to free up IRQ 12 for other devices.
....



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#13
September 27, 2006 at 08:25:23
I've just noticed something. You haven't specifically mentioned un-installing the drivers for the onboard video. If you haven't done that, the drivers for the onboard and ATI video may be conflicting with each other.
Boot up with just the onboard video, the ATI card removed.
Look in Add and Remove Programs to see if there are any listing for the onboard video -Pro Savage, or S3 video, or whatever - drivers or anything related to the onboard video. If you see that / those, un-install them.

If you did find entries there to remove, try physically installing the ATI card again with the monitor connected to it, boot, and see what happens.
If no change, even if you try the F8 procedure, if you did find entries there to remove in Add and Remove, there are other things I can suggest.



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#14
September 27, 2006 at 13:56:16
Okay. So i've uninstalled the onboard drivers multiple times---to no avail. that was the first thing I did, in fact.
the f8 thing doesn't work (I can't access the boot menu). What you have to understand is that the CPU isn't even running when the AGP card is in. What I mean is: I can get the computer running on the AGP card, but once I shut down, and boot up again, the motherboard just hangs, caught between the two. So there is no opportunity to try pressing F8, because the motherboard isn't even running POST yet. See what I mean? i can tell whether the mobo is running by the sounds it makes--when I unplug the agp card everything sounds fine, i can here it make that whirring sound, like engines powering up. with the AGP card in, it simply turns on the CPU fan, and does nothing else. I can tell--- you don't hear the HD disks spinning, not nothing. So the MOBO is hanging. could this be a power problem?

I tried removing all the PCI cards, the PS/2 mouse and keyboard, same deal.


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#15
September 27, 2006 at 15:21:37
So some more ideas---
I can get it to restart now, each time. But it's no where near fixed. What I do is, I pull the Powerchord out from the back of the chassis. Then I plug it back in, and it boots up (most of the time).
What does that mean? Could this be a power problem, or not?
Also, I was thinking of changing the IRQ of the AGP Card to a lower number. Would that make any difference?

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#16
September 27, 2006 at 16:28:36
The symptoms are most like an IRQ confict - something is trying to use the same IRQ as the AGP and the two or more devices are clashing.
When you load the drivers from the CD for the AGP card, they are not actually all loaded until the next boot, and that is when your computer video quits.

If you were trying to force the AGP to use a certain IRQ up till now, don't do that - the P&P in the bios or the operating system usually does a much better job of picking which IRQ to use than you could.
If you were letting the bios auto choose the IRQ for the AGP, like I said above, you could try turning off PNP OS Installed (No) in the bios if it is on (Yes), or visa versa. (PNP/PCI Configurations).
Only if that or the other suggestions in my last few posts don't work, and you now want to force it to use an IRQ, you could try that, but there's no way to predict whether that IRQ is available to the AGP slot, and it's a crap shoot.

Read over my last few posts first.


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#17
September 27, 2006 at 16:32:37
By the way, with most ATI chipset cards it is NOT a good idea to let Windows load drivers for the card while booting the first time the card is detected after it is installed. You Cancel that, or the two instances if there are two, and load the drivers using the install from the CD.

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#18
September 27, 2006 at 18:00:20
Yeah I never let xp load the drivers. I always install from cd (or whathaveyou).
I have already tried turning PnP off, it doesn't do anything....
i think i'll try everything over. I'll start from scratch and post my findings.
i've also been posting here, if you're interested: http://www.computerforum.com/59270-...

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#19
September 27, 2006 at 19:31:45
Most power supplies are now capable of suppling a small charge to the motherboard even when off. Pulling the plug disrupts that. That's obviously related to the card working OK after pulling the plug. I don't know what the fix for that would be.

I still think a non-ATI card is the way to go.


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#20
September 27, 2006 at 21:17:08
According to what you've said, the onboard video does not show up in Device Manager the first time you boot with the ATI chipped Asus AGP card, so there's every indication the the onboard video IS disabled when you plug in the ATI card. Your problem probably lies elsewhere.
...

I have installed a dozen or more ATI cards or clone cards with ATI chipsets in many different mboards. I had only one I installed myself that was difficult to install (ATI's Xpert 98), and it was because it wasn't intended to be installed on a mboard with onboard video, and it's only hard to install in Win 98SE and below - it installs fine in XP. The only other one I had problems with was one someone else's who had tried to update the drivers and applications in the wrong order.
A few of them did the blinking monitor led thing, but I was able to do the F8 - Enable Vga mode thing, or similar with older Op systems, with all of those.

I'm still curious about this:
"In the bios - Integrated Peripherals - Init Display First - what choices does it give you there? Only PCI slot or Integrated?
An AGP slot is not a PCI slot.
What did you set that to?"


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#21
September 28, 2006 at 09:45:32
It gives me the option to set it to "initialize with" AGP or PCI. It changes nothing.
Well, today I decided I'll RMA this thing and order an Nvidia, see how that goes. I'll post if it works out.
thanks for your help so far.


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#22
September 28, 2006 at 11:08:15
It should be set to AGP of course.
There is probably nothing wrong with the Asus video card. Sometimes some mboards do not get along with some video cards.

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#23
September 29, 2006 at 16:45:53
Try replacing the CMOS battery.

Larry

Today seems like a good day to chew through the restraints.


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#24
October 7, 2006 at 21:07:07
For one, I did remove the cmos battery, and replace it, about a million times.
this is what i did to fix it:
I went out and bought an Nvidia card. It works great-- no problems at all.

So for future solution-seekers, just return the damn card and buy a new one!
assuming you have the exact same problem as me, of course.


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#25
October 7, 2006 at 21:20:48
Thanks for posting back. Sometimes PC peripherals just aren't compatible.

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#26
November 2, 2006 at 12:43:41
I was able to disable my onboard video, and use my PCI TV Tuner card.

Your model seems like a Gigabyte, same as mine. The secret for me was that I discovered the hidden bios menu called Advanced Chipset features. You get this by hitting Ctrl F1 upon getting into the Bios. This adds a couple of menu options. Select Advanced Chipset features. When getting into that, I tried disabling and degrading anything that had to do with AGP. The key one for me was to disable a VGA shared resourses or whatever near the bottom. After a year and a half (not continuously attempting every evening, but looked at recently as my regular TV is in the repair shop), I got it to work!


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#27
November 2, 2006 at 17:57:20
His model L7VMM is an ECS mboard, not a Gigabyte. He was trying to get an AGP card to work, not a PCI one. "I discovered the hidden bios menu called Advanced Chipset features." In most bioses those are not hidden.
However, your info may be useful for a particular Gigabyte mboard bios, if you stated which model you have, or for a group of Gigabyte mboards.

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