Solved Difference between desktop and tower

September 15, 2010 at 10:30:03
Specs: Windows 7, 2.792 GHz / 1022 MB
I wanted to ask what is the main difference between a desktop and tower-casing? Are desktops usually slow? Means like when copying data to Flash Disks and in games what do you recommend? I need a brief explanation please

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#1
September 15, 2010 at 10:47:43
✔ Best Answer
Inside, nothing at all. Desktop is just a computer that sits on the desktop as opposed to a laptop. A tower is simply a case that stands upright on the desk as opposed to a one that lies flat in the desk. Towers are almost universal these days because the have a smaller foot print than the original PC design.

What goes inside them is what matters, not the size or design of the case that contains the hardware,

Stuart


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#2
September 15, 2010 at 11:15:00
Desktop are faster than notebook/netbook and they are cheaper.

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#3
September 15, 2010 at 11:22:40
Thank you both of you! but that's what i am talking about that if we compare gx280 tower case and gx 260 desktop what will be the difference? Is it that if we use same hardware in both of them , the desktop will be slower? I am not talking of laptops or notebooks , just PCs!

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Related Solutions

#4
September 15, 2010 at 11:35:51
Secondly will the desktop PC or tower PC will be better for a bit of games?

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#5
September 15, 2010 at 11:36:17
Tower computers are usually faster than desktops. The big "sleeping tower" desktop cases of yesteryear are gone, and most recent desktop systems are SFF/slim "office computers" with slower CPUs and graphics chips. However, the slower CPU shouldn't affect USB performance to your flash drive.

If you want an upgradable high-performance gaming computer, you'd put an ATX motherboard into a big ass tower case.

HTPC | Pentium M @ 2.82GHz, 2MB L2) | 4GB | 1.0TB | Radeon HD5750
Blu-Ray | Win 7 Pro | HDMI out to Onkyo TX-SR707 AV receiver


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#6
September 15, 2010 at 11:44:26
Is it that if we use same hardware in both of them , the desktop will be slower?

If you use the same hardware they will be identical. The design, shape or anything else to do with the case has no bearing whatsoever on the performance of the computer except that a bigger case will be easier to keep cool.

Desktop or tower are meaningless words invented by salesmen that have nothing to do with the hardware

you'd put an ATX motherboard into a big ass tower case.

What happens if you put the same motherboard in a case made of cardboard? It is going to be any slower?

Stuart


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#7
September 15, 2010 at 13:27:36
I desktop case lies on it's side, like a VCR. For example:

http://www.dansdata.com/images/llpc...

A tower case stands upright, like so:

http://www.lambda-tek.com/component...


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#8
September 15, 2010 at 13:41:11
Finally, aside from the mechanical desktop & tower cases you have got a THIRD kind of desktop and that is Windows Desktop. Welcome to the world of the never ending confusing computer terminology.

i_Xp/Vista/W7User


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#9
September 15, 2010 at 13:41:14
Originally a tower case was a large to old multiple 5,25 drives. Some were about 3 feet tall and weighed close to a hundred pounds, They were usually placed on the floor next to the desk. Today towers are mini and micro versions.

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#10
September 15, 2010 at 14:26:24
"What happens if you put the same motherboard in a case made of cardboard?"

You'd get five minutes of spectacular gaming performance before your house burns down. :)

As I said in my first post, I haven't seen a sleeping tower in years; most desktop cases today only hold mATX boards & some of them are limited to half-height video cards. None of them have good cooling.

HTPC | Pentium M @ 2.82GHz, 2MB L2) | 4GB | 1.0TB | Radeon HD5750
Blu-Ray | Win 7 Pro | HDMI out to Onkyo TX-SR707 AV receiver


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#11
September 15, 2010 at 14:43:44
"What happens if you put the same motherboard in a case made of cardboard?"

You'd get five minutes of spectacular gaming performance before your house burns down. :)

If it got so hot that it would ignite that cardboard then you would have some really serious problems. The computer would fail long before the cardboard got hot enough to ignite.

http://www.tis-gdv.de/tis_e/ware/pa...

The fire point is 258°C, the ignition temperature 427°C

Just to give you a comparison, the solder that holds the electronics circuits together melts at around 180C. Long after most CPU has fried themselves into oblivion.

Stuart


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#12
September 15, 2010 at 18:28:11
thanks alot all of you! I am having problems with my dell gx280 and need to change from dell but don't know which brand now to buy! but i can't go expensive right now because i have to arrange money for a laptop in a year! if you can recommend something cheap that will suit my needs having same specs as gx280! my system has 80 gb hd, 1gb ram and 2.8ghz processor! I don't want a gamer pc right now because i have to go abroad in a year and then i wil buy a laptop so what will you recommend me! I have an ATI radeon x300 with me for putting into my new pc!

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