Did I fry a CPU when I re-installed it without paste.

May 28, 2012 at 13:03:39
Specs: Windows XP, 3000+ AMD Athalon
E Machines W3400 AMD Athalon 64Bit Processor ATI Graphics card.

I first troubleshooted the long continuous beeps by taking out everything including the cmos battery for it to reset.Which it did just fine. I noticed that the had drive was failing so I ran Hiren's Boot CD to diagnose it. Upon going through this I hard and notice the fan was making noise. It and the heat sink was filthy with tar and dust. The previous owner was a heavy smoker. I removed the fan and tried with compressed air and to brush some off of the heat sink. That didn't work. So I thought to thoroughly clean it was to take it off of the CPU and clean the vanes. On doing so the CPU managed to come with it. I replaced the CPU correctly or so I thought, lining up the arrows and notch in the pins. I replaced the heatsink and fan,WITHOUT pasting it. I got everything squared away and when I turned on the computer it didn't start up. The fans were running full blast without any video, which I had before. To make a long to short, did I just fry the CPU? Or is there something else I've over looked. I didn't have it on more than 20 secs total. 10 seconds at first, then when I tried to make sure the CPU was seated properly. I know this is an old computer but, it has sentimental value to the pesron that gave it to me. I was going to give it back after I had fixed it. (Her father owned and has since passed) Now I believe I've fragged it. What are my options at this point? Salvage parts? Paperweight? Thanks ahead
for the help.


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#1
May 28, 2012 at 14:22:57
Heat can't not fry A64 chip & modern chips.
On doing so the CPU managed to come with it
I believe this killed the board.
Next time start the system for few minutes before removing the heatsink.

Try to apply thermal paste like this
http://i.imgur.com/YEuIU.jpg

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.


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#2
May 28, 2012 at 14:58:12
Killed the board? There was no power running to it. How could have it done so? It was running for about 20 mins into diagnosing it with a couple of Hiren's tools. But, I will take the advice next time I run into the same situation. thanks.

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#3
May 28, 2012 at 16:12:54
"Killed the board? There was no power running to it"

Was it unplugged from the wall or killed at the power strip? If not, there was power going to it. Make sure it's unplugged, then remove the HSF & the CPU again. Check the pins to make sure none are bent or broken. If the CPU is OK, put it back together using a tiny dab of thermal paste in the center of the CPU. Like THIS!


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#4
May 28, 2012 at 16:31:51
I fail to see how you can take a heat-sink of and bring the CPU with it. The CPU is clamped into place and the clamp cannot be released until the heat-sink is removed. So by forcing it you have probably damaged the socket with renders the motherboard useless.

Stuart


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#5
May 28, 2012 at 16:43:56
I killed my first p4 board by pulling the heatsink and CPU came off with it.
This is possible in old boards because they use lever to secure CPU into the socket.

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.


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#6
May 28, 2012 at 17:13:09
You can fry a cpu easily. Many other issues exist too.

Hang up and live.


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#7
May 28, 2012 at 17:37:57
You can fry a cpu easily
CPU is a hard component to die in computer.
Nowadays only over-voltage can kill a CPU.

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.


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#8
May 28, 2012 at 19:04:49
Yes, It was completely unplugged from everything.

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#9
May 28, 2012 at 21:36:44
It doesn't matter if it was unplugged or plugged, if the heatsink came with CPU the damage is there.

Did u try to apply thermal paste?

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.


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#10
May 29, 2012 at 08:22:26
Only a person that wanted to buy a new cpu would attempt to run a cpu without proper cooling. It WILL burn out. The chip is on the top on the package and needs to have proper cooling at all times.

The advice of kuwese is contrary to every document by processor makers made in the last 20 years.

I don't know what one thinks the thing is made of. 100watts or so in a 1/64th inch spot for only a moment will heat the chip to well beyond limits.

Hang up and live.


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#11
May 29, 2012 at 08:52:23
Jefro
Overheating can't kill the chip(It used to be in athlon xp days).
If overheating occurs the first thing CPU do to protect itself is Throttling then it will shutdown itself if temp increase.
New chip are well protected from overheating.
Not long ago in CPU forum a guy killed his APU from over-volting.

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.


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#12
May 30, 2012 at 06:14:30

Well, upon recollection, I did pull the lever holding the chip in. Didn't realized it at the time. The heat sink strap is anchored on the lever mechanism. I thought by moving the lever it would be easier to get the heat sink strap off. It was, that's why the cpu came with it. The pins were not damaged though. I will try again when I have the time in a few days. Be assured I'm stopping by Radio Shack to get the thermal paste.... I may have not had the chip locked down correctly. Would this cause the same trouble?


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#13
May 30, 2012 at 11:52:29
Its not the pins you need worry about, it is the socket itself. If you have damaged the locking mechanism and the CPU cannot be locked properly in its socket then it is never going to work as the pins will not make proper contact. It only needs one pin to be not be connected properly and nothing works.

Stuart


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